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Old 09-02-2011, 05:16 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN (North Minneapolis area)
2,032 posts, read 4,321,871 times
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Are there any people who live on roads like 83 or 7?
Im on google maps checking out Nebraska because, well I'm just bored. Does anyone live off either of those two roads? It doesn't look like theres anything on 7 between Brewster and Ainsworth and it looks equally as dead on 83 between Valentine and Thedford.

Rural living intrigues me, and I'm just wondering do people live off of those two roads or any other very rural roads like that with just about no towns?

I'm a big city kinda guy, but I'd at least would love to spend like a month in some uber rural area. It'd be a blast!
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Old 09-02-2011, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,178 posts, read 9,426,227 times
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LOL Of course they do!!
If you go to Google Earth, you'll see lots of gravel roads leading off of 83. Most ranchers have hundreds of acres along 83, but unlike city people, they don't build their houses right along the roads. They build them where there is easily accessible water, where their great-grandfather had his place long before 83 was built or paved, where there are already barns and a cleared homestead. "Looks dead"? Uh-unh - it is teaming with life; everything from quail, deer, turkeys, and antelope to ranchers and cowboys driving their trailers full of horses to the middle of one pasture, to mount up and herd hundreds of cattle from one pasture to the next, the herd dogs barking at their heels. In the winter you can see flatbed pickups with huge rolled hay bales, driving across the snowy hills and pitching hay to the surrounding and following cattle.

I live right on the edge of a small (145 pop) town on State Highway 20, but most of my friends live in ranch houses that are near the river, down twisting gravel roads that are so narrow they look like someone's driveway. The most wonderful thing about living off the beaten and paved track is the silence. No cars, no trucks, just owls hooting, coyotes baying, cattle mooing. Come to think of it, it isn't all that silent! heehee

Last edited by SCGranny; 09-02-2011 at 06:36 AM..
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Old 09-02-2011, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN (North Minneapolis area)
2,032 posts, read 4,321,871 times
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Thank you!
And when I said it look's dead, I didn't mean for that to be a negative term, my bad. I apologize
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Old 09-03-2011, 02:52 AM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,178 posts, read 9,426,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radical_Car View Post
Thank you!
And when I said it look's dead, I didn't mean for that to be a negative term, my bad. I apologize
Yer fine! I didn't take it that way!
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Old 09-07-2011, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Savannah, GA
99 posts, read 157,583 times
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It's funny that I found this thread. Nebraska and other midwestern states have always intrigued me because of their sparse population. I have looked at the Nebraska map and there wide open spaces between towns. Makes me wonder what goes on out yonder. (Again, this is not a negative post at all. I would love to visit sometime.)
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Old 09-07-2011, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,178 posts, read 9,426,227 times
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What do you want to know?

There's more cows than there are people in my county, as well as most of the counties around. Drive down the interstates and everything is flat; you have to get off the interstates and drive down the state roads to see anything - and even then you won't see much. In the Sandhills (the remnants of a prehistoric ocean that blew away and piled up here) the landscape is ofen described as like being on a ship in a massive rolling ocean of green (spring) brown (most summers) or white. Crest a hill and you'll spot a tiny town with Old West buildings and a few new ones; crest another and you'll see a town with stoplights, colleges, and lots of little shops. Crest the next and you'll suddenly be lookiing straight down into a deep-sided tumbling creek or river, surrounded by maples, hawthorns, cottonwoods, and cedars. You'll see lines of cedars marching sideways across the hills; they are used as wind and snowbreaks to help keep the roads clear. Expect to drive 150-200 miles before you see a WalMart or a 4 lane road.

If you go off the paved road into little gravel roads that look like private driveways, you'll really see something then. Old houses, new houses; big fancy barns or small pole barns, windmills endlessly pumping water into giant steel troughs surrounded by cattle. Come around a bend and an old one-lane iron bridge is suddenly before you, spanning a river down which locals float on tubes. Look up or down that river and you'll see where the wildlife come to drink; huge flocks of Canadian Geese overwinter here and on the still, still lakes scattered around like surprising jeweled and watery gifts that fell out of a bag - here, there, and over there. There are people fishing all year round, even when the ice is frozen thick enough to drive a 4WD truck on, pulling in bass, trout, and crappie, yellowtail and even pike and catfish. Look far enough and you'll see tumbling waterfalls down huge stretches of rock and sandy bluffs. All around, folks are out haying, harvesting, or a-horseback, roping and herding and caring for huge herds of mostly ornery but sweet-flavoured grassfed cattle. You'll see 20-30 antelope laying on the side of a hill in the shade, or as many large deer, poking their heads up out of the grass as if to say, "YOU? What are YOU doing here?" Red tailed hawks and bald eagles are not shy about plunging to earth near or even on the roads, claws extended, taking out rodents and rabbits with zest and vigor. Huge flocks of turkeys bustle across the road, intent on fowl business, ignoring vehicles and anything else in their determined shuffle.

There are two things you'll notice about the Great Plains if you are here at least a week... the wind almost never stops, and the silence is unbroken except for the occasional mooing herd, or wildlife going about their life-or-death business in the wild high grasses. In the winter, the snow comes in all shapes and sizes, from the soft landscape-burying drifts that dreamily, silently, almost effortlessly, pile up and up and up, to the screaming blizzards that block roads and barns, and people inside their houses for days. Like as not after a good snowstorm, you'll see some sneaky lil devils of the bovine variety climbing up snowbanks over 5-and-6-foot high, barbwire fences that have been buried by drifting snow.

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Old 09-08-2011, 06:48 AM
 
Location: Savannah, GA
99 posts, read 157,583 times
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Sounds like heaven. I haven't been to Nebraska but I've been to Kansas (I-70 E to W) and West Texas. I did like W. Texas. It's just a large expanse with dirt roads shooting off from the main road. These dirt roads seem to go on for miles and my interest usually gets the best of me. I wonder what goes on down those roads.

^^^Your post is what I kind of expected. Just a serene peacefulness abounds.
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Old 09-08-2011, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN (North Minneapolis area)
2,032 posts, read 4,321,871 times
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Yeah, I'd like to visit too. Eastern Montana all the way down to Texas all the way to Eastern Oregon. I usually say I don't care for country, but to be honest the most rural I've been to is Southwest Minnesota.
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