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Old 11-12-2013, 01:15 PM
 
84 posts, read 100,506 times
Reputation: 45

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mostie View Post
Um, no. Take that person's quotes seriously- she, or he, is spot-on. They are NOT "exceptionally friendly people". In fact, the majority of them seem to be rude, angry, and forever glaring.
Such is not the case. Quite the contrary.
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Old 02-16-2014, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Central Nebraska
553 posts, read 476,700 times
Reputation: 559
313 Tuxedo, I am REALLY late to the party, but you want to know why Nebraskans either live in town or live on a farm and you see almost no strips of houses along rural roads as is common back East. It has nothing to do with whether or not you can get water: If you want water you're welcome to dig a well and put in a septic tank. As I understand it, this all has to do with protecting the family farm. Farming is the backbone of Nebraska's economy and rural housing developments are a threat to farming. In the first place, every small acreage takes a little bit of ag land out of production--forever. In the second place, all these city folks living on an acre or two out in the country expect rural roads to be exactly like city streets. They DEMAND snow removal within hours, not days and in general are a real headache on limited county resources and to meet their demands would tax the farmers out of business. Finally, a hostile attitude toward agriculture can set in. Out in Maryland a few years ago a farmer started to take his tractor to another field a few miles down the road. A police officer stopped him and demanded he clean the mud off his tractor wheels and clean the mud they left on the road. So Nebraska has passed laws that make it very difficult to buy anything less than a quarter section (quarter square mile, 160 acres) and at $5,000 an acre for a minimum of 160 acres that's a mighty expenssive house out in the country. Also, ag land has a lower property tax rate than non-ag land--so if you don't farm that land you'll be paying taxes out the wazoo for it. There are a few acreages that had already been sold and these have been grandfathered in, but it's almost impossible to create new ones. It all has to do with protecting the state's biggest industry.
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Old 02-16-2014, 08:42 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,742,753 times
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^Not just back East. Rural subdivisions are absolutely wrecking agriculture in Colorado, literally rendering whole Colorado counties essentially non-viable for agriculture in the last 30 years. Rural subdivisions--"ranchettes"--are a cancer. They should be outlawed everywhere there is prime ag land--ag land is too precious to waste (permanently) because of them.
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Old 02-17-2014, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Central Nebraska
553 posts, read 476,700 times
Reputation: 559
I am sure Original Poster SmithPartyof5 has long ago made their selection, but for what it's worth I'd like to address her post: Having lived in Pennsylvania and Maryland and travelled through Upstate New York I can say that Eastern Nebraska most nearly resembles what you're accustomed to. Forests are found along the rivers. If you can accept a forest only a couple hundred feet wide the Platte River can seem to be a forest.

I think you would find Aurora is close to the ideal you're looking for. (No, I have never lived in Aurora.) Aurora has a Class B school. Class B refers to size, not academic standing: The 16 largest schools are Class A, the next 32 Class B, the next 64 Class C, and the remaining 120 are Class D. With 100 students in a graduating class Aurora is large enough to afford the kind of equipment, facilities, and class variety you're looking for--but still small enough your children will not be numbers lost in a crowd. Aurora was the first community around here to have Internet and seems to be on the leading edge of technology. The guy who invented Twitter was from Aurora, and one of the animators for Dinsey also came from Aurora. A fellow by the name of Edgerton came from an earlier generation in Aurora and invented the strobe light and a lot of other things. The Hastings Museum has a planetarium for the Space-minded and a Big
Screen that shows a lot of educational films. I believe you will be impressed by the Edgerton Center there in Aurora. There's a large park in north centeral Aurora and a nature trail leads from there around the eastern edge of town. I've never been there, but a local TV station reported a few years ago that the largest buffalo herd in the world is on a farm near Marquette north of Aurora. If you don't mind draging yourself over there at 4:00 on a cold March morning there is a blind near Alda where you can shivver and then watch an enormous flock of sandhill cranes wake up, make a lot of noise, and then take to the air--a very impressive sight. Cranes make a kind of "agggow!" sound and tourists from all over the world come here in March to see them and a few hundred thousand other migratory birds. (The rivers north of the Platte are still froze.)

Most of your day-to-day needs are carried by small stores in Aurora. If you want to do some REAL shopping Grand Island is only 20 miles away with most of the big-box stores on the west edge of town in the Webb Road-Hwy 281 Corridor. Wal-Mart South is the first thing you come to from Aurora, has everything the Wall Supercenter North has and only half the traffic. Grand Island has a population of 50,000 and has pretty much everything you're looking for while still retaining a small-town atmosphere. There are dozens of restaurants--Valentino's and Uncle Ed's are always rated pretty high--but there are two Japanese restaurants, a dozen Chinese places, a couple dozen for pizza--and more Mexican food places than you can shake a stick at, as well as the usual burger and sandwitch shops. Runza began in Nebraska.

For Culture Lincoln is 80 miles away by interstate and besides having 300,000 people it also has the university of Nebraska and a couple of smaller colleges and has the cultural ammenities college professors like to have around.

When it comes to buying land, it can be difficult finding anything less than 160 acres. This has to do with family farms being nibbled out of existence a few acres at a time. Farming is the backbone of Nebraska's economy and laws have been enacted to protect and promote farming. With falling ag prices the price of farm land is expected to plummet this year so you can probably pick up a quarter-section (one-quarter of a square mile) at a reasonable price--but you better farm it or your property taxes will get bumped up into the much-higher non-ag bracket which on that much land will skin you alive. You don't have to have a corn-cattle operation, though. You might want to look into unconventional crops like ginsing, chickory (a coffee substitute), rye, ect. I have thought about greenhouse farming. Suppose you had a greenhouse 140 feet long and 40 feet wide with 24 120 foot long rows on three waist-high fishtanks. The middle fishtank might have a 4-foot wide gap in it for a bee hive. A tomato plant every 8 inches and two tomatoes (two tomatoes weigh about one pound) per plant per week and you sell them to the store at half retail price and figue half of that is expenses and one man could probably handle three such greenhouses and you can figure out your income. For heating I would suggest drilling a thousand feet down. Let the water from one end of a fish tank drop in a pipe a thousand feet down where the Earth's heat will warm it for free. It would rise through the loop of pipe to about the level of the fish tank and at the other end where you can pump it the rest of the way back into the tank very cheaply.
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Old 03-30-2014, 12:45 PM
 
107 posts, read 99,645 times
Reputation: 64
Your gonna find clickesh folks in most small towns any where U go. I grew up near one and couldn't wait to join the military and get away. I goes it with the territory. I was born and spent my first four years in western Nebr. Used to have family there. Was raised in Missouri, married to a hispanic Texan and lived in West Texas four years, and have lived in eastern Oklahoma for 40 years. A true Midwesterner you might say.
There may be an aire of true to what the last poster mentioned about Nebr. but it's worth looking at and it's not all bad. Like any small town you need to "establish yourself" and that may take some time. But the winter weather can be murderously cold in the windswept plains of Nebr.
Having lived in various parts of the Midwest, as explained above, I've generally find Okies and Texans to be friendly people. I just retired from a major airline company as I worked at their large maintenance base in Tulsa. We occasionally had new hires or transfers from the Northeast. They were always amazed at how friendly the people are here. Texas is similar with some significant reasons to move there. People are flocking there for a good reason. Read a recent Time magazine article entitled "The United States of Texas" for more detail. It's a very business friendly state. Just don't go there with an "attitude" and you'll be fine. Because both states are used to large numbers of people moving in, they are not clickesh even in smaller towns. THe cost of living and buying a home compared to what your used to will surprise you.
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Old 03-30-2014, 01:02 PM
 
1,054 posts, read 1,824,590 times
Reputation: 699
Quote:
Originally Posted by Filthy McNasty View Post
Such is not the case. Quite the contrary.
She moved away a few years ago and has had this disturbing obsession with omaha ever since. It is an obsession as she just can't stop looking back. She has this crazy victim mentality that allows her to self-justify her constant and persistent posting with an impending disaster mentality of her life here. She feels justified to continually obsess about us as a place and people. It is sad, disturbing and borderline personality in my opinion.
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Old 04-05-2014, 10:36 PM
 
107 posts, read 99,645 times
Reputation: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxworthy5 View Post
Your gonna find clickesh folks in most small towns any where U go. I grew up near one and couldn't wait to join the military and get away. I goes it with the territory. I was born and spent my first four years in western Nebr. Used to have family there. Was raised in Missouri, married to a hispanic Texan and lived in West Texas four years, and have lived in eastern Oklahoma for 40 years. A true Midwesterner you might say.
There may be an aire of true to what the last poster mentioned about Nebr. but it's worth looking at and it's not all bad. Like any small town you need to "establish yourself" and that may take some time. But the winter weather can be murderously cold in the windswept plains of Nebr.
Having lived in various parts of the Midwest, as explained above, I've generally find Okies and Texans to be friendly people. I just retired from a major airline company as I worked at their large maintenance base in Tulsa. We occasionally had new hires or transfers from the Northeast. They were always amazed at how friendly the people are here. Texas is similar with some significant reasons to move there. People are flocking there for a good reason. Read a recent Time magazine article entitled "The United States of Texas" for more detail. It's a very business friendly state. Just don't go there with an "attitude" and you'll be fine. Because both states are used to large numbers of people moving in, they are not clickesh even in smaller towns. THe cost of living and buying a home compared to what your used to will surprise you.
And if that's not enough to convince you go to; Moderator cut: link removed, linking to competitor sites is not allowed If you don't want the hassle of a big city then move into a smaller suburb. And remember, this is only one of four major cites in Texas. I still claim to be a husker but in your case I think Tex has got everything you want, just my opinion.

Last edited by Yac; 04-08-2014 at 07:28 AM..
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Old 04-09-2014, 08:55 AM
 
2 posts, read 2,730 times
Reputation: 11
kearney nebraska is a very nice town with lots to offer we have good schools and shops and friendly people. we have a park with a beautiful rock garden.
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Old 04-18-2014, 11:58 AM
 
6 posts, read 19,317 times
Reputation: 17
Default Good Folks

I can't provide recommendations as to where any of the posters asking for help should live but I did want to convey my thoughts for the Nebraskans that I know best and granted it is a small sample size but understand that I don't live in Nebraska...never have...no family there. I do go to the Sandhills every year for about a month. When I was 30 years old, I had the need to reroute a western road trip across Hyw 20 in northern nebraska. I'd never seen the Sandhills, didn't even know that was what they were called at the time, except the road signs kept using the word. I'd never seen anything so beautiful in all my life. I wrote the Sandhill Cattle Association a note indicating I would like to visit a working ranch for several weeks and received a call from a ranching family in the Bassett, NE area. I"ve been going for nearly 10 years and they are, without a doubt, some of the nicest people on earth. As with any area, you must have sincere respect for the way people live. In the sandhills, if you don't have respect for grass, water, cows, and calves...you won't be warmly welcomed. You also can't be allergic to work...these folks are some of hardest working folks I know with long days of haying, calving, and fencing.

As a southerner, I found the people in the Sandhills to be "southern-like" which isn't that surprising since the area was settled, in large part, by Texans that drove cattle north for the grazing months. When I was invited over for "supper", I knew these were my kind of people.

Some people go to exotic beaches, European villas, etc.....I go to the Sandhills and listen to the wind, bawling calves, and coyotes....it seems to put life back in order for me.
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Old 04-20-2014, 03:06 AM
 
Location: Midtown Omaha
605 posts, read 1,057,146 times
Reputation: 122
Tell you about Nebraska? I'll tell you about Nebraska: I think people need to be a bit more real about the choices Nebraska's Unicameral made this session. Nebraska is becoming a Bottom 10 state, not just because LGBT issues were voted down, but also rejected were Medicaid Expansion, Minimum Wage increase, and Second parent adoption to name a few. And Nebraska's largest city was recently named the most dangerous city for our nation's African Americans. Nebraska is the third worst state for taxpayers according to WalletHub. Republicans in control have done nothing to expand our revenue base to help ease the tax burden on the middle and lower class, but they claim to be about less taxes. What a lie. Nebraska is making itself unlivable. It is time the nation hear more about it than ever. Sure Omaha and Nebraska will make some top list somewhere, but do the criteria even mention the negative? Do the criteria even matter to minorities? NOPE! Of course not, even the progressive elite likes to brush the bad stuff under the rug. The top lists only apply to the straight, white, affluent Christian demographic, everyone else can suck it in this state. Just another reason to leave this state in droves. Let the GOP rule here. Its their kingdom. They poisoned it. #NoNebraska
https://www.facebook.com/NoNebraska
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