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Old 05-23-2007, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Omaha, NE
1,119 posts, read 3,814,892 times
Reputation: 405

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Every night must have fallen on all 36 murders that happen in the entire 450,000 sized city last year (way way below the national average for metro cities)
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Old 05-23-2007, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Omaha, NE
1,119 posts, read 3,814,892 times
Reputation: 405
Default .....

To be honest, I lived in Lincoln for awhile and it wasn't all that bad...
I like Omaha because it's becoming big time, but lincoln is no complete slouch... it has progressive minds starting to roll.. The thing that holds anyone back in the two big cities would have to be the fear that some of the legislatures have in losing their positions if they do something radical for the state, they're not terrible, but they sure can be alot more bold...
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Old 05-24-2007, 05:53 AM
 
Location: New Mexico to Nebraska
25 posts, read 79,550 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattDen View Post
I was wondering why Omaha is so much more moderate politically then Lincoln.

It seems like Lincoln is alot like the rural areas in Nebraska. Very, very conservative on social issues. I would venture to guess that Lincolnites are the most socially conservative people in the country, especially the 20 and 30
somethings. Actually conservative isnt even the word for Lincoln's social political beliefs, its more extremeist and fringe then conservative.

The average Lincolnite politically loves high local taxes (they love tax increases). The average Lincolnite is vehemently anti-gay, anti-choice on abortion rights. They also believe in marriage is solely for the purpose of pro-creation and people have a duty to have many, many babies. Another example of the fiscal leftism/social extreme conservative way of Lincoln is the high-schools here subsidise women who have lots of babies before they graduate with child care because they feel like a women might as well start her reproductive duties early. Just a strange, strange place politically probubly even more unique then some of the beliefs people hold in rural Utah

Whats ironic about Lincoln politics is that the average Lincolnite is very, very socially conservative but they have no problem with very poor people have many babies. In fact Lincoln encourages very poor people who are struggling to have babies, very ironic political structure with Lincoln being so fiscally far to the left and so socially conservative.

Omaha on the other hand is very moderate politically. People tend to be moderate socially and fiscally in Omaha. Omaha for the most part is a normal midwestern place politically.

Omahans seem to have logical mainstream political beliefs, while Lincolnites have extreme fringe political beliefs on both fiscal and social issues unlike anywhere else in the country.

Lincoln tries to be a very, very far-left city on fiscal issues while being rabidly socially conservative and it doesnt seem to be working out very well and causes lots of problems. Huge deficits, massive school spending while the city infrastructure rots, people having babies in massive numbers they arent able to take care of so the foster care rate is very high.
This post is COMPLETELY bizarre. First of all, the University of Nebraska is located where? LINCOLN.

Dude, I'm so liberal I'm almost a communist, seriously, and this post is so far off the mark it's unreal. There are socially progressive people EVERYWHERE just as there are conservatives EVERYWHERE.

And part of being liberal: TOLERANCE. This includes tolerance for other people's beliefs. Unless someone else's beliefs has a direct impact on me or my family, it makes no difference to me. What I'm saying is, my next door neighbor can be homophobic, pro-life, and love Jerry Falwell. Unless they're protesting the fact that I have gay friends and am pro-choice, WHO GIVES A FIG.

And HOW are compiling your data? Are you a professional sociologist? I mean seriously.

AS A LIBERAL I DENOUNCE THIS GUY and please don't judge the rest of us liberals by this guy's comments.
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Old 05-24-2007, 12:13 PM
 
21 posts, read 69,145 times
Reputation: 19
aaaaaaahhhhhh because MattDen moved to Omaha?
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Old 06-26-2007, 03:43 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,092 times
Reputation: 10
Default Facts are important here

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattDen View Post
Imagining what??


I dont doubt they have many families with 2 and 3 kids but they seem to have alot of very large households here also especially in the areas just adjacent to the university except to the area to the south.

Anyway, I looked it up and the facts and enrollment say Lincoln has 33,000 students at LPS and the population is 240,000 people

Minneapolis public schools has 36,000 students for 370,000 people.

Obviously, since Lincoln has a much larger pecentage of students going to public schools then alot of other cities then I am not imagining that Lincoln has alot of very large families.

MattDen, you rely a lot on what you've seen versus real data. This reply is a little late, but I didn't see anyone comment on your incorrect data. The fact is that while Minneapolis public schools only have 36,000 students for the 370k, Saint Paul has the second highest students per capita in the U.S. in it's own public schools. Boston ranks higher.

That said, the true measure is not the number of kids in school, but the actual number/percent of children overall:

Lincoln percent of population aged 0-19: 27.4%
Minneapolis 0-19: 25.67
St. Paul 0-19: 32.26
U.S 0-19: 27.4%

Lincoln's positively average according to U.S. 2000 stats.


There are a lot of factors involved with this that taking simply one biased cut of data cannot show. One fact that sits out there is the average value of the homes in Lincoln are higher than Omaha's. I had lived in Lincoln for 27 years and Omaha now for 4. I like both towns, the feel is surely different, but Lincoln is not what you think it is. Maybe you didn't travel far enough around it? Lower crime rates in Lincoln, higher property values doesn't fit with your particular view of the city.
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Old 06-26-2007, 05:32 PM
 
14,271 posts, read 15,102,020 times
Reputation: 8318
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattDen View Post
I was wondering why Omaha is so much more moderate politically then Lincoln.

It seems like Lincoln is alot like the rural areas in Nebraska. Very, very conservative on social issues. I would venture to guess that Lincolnites are the most socially conservative people in the country, especially the 20 and 30
somethings. Actually conservative isnt even the word for Lincoln's social political beliefs, its more extremeist and fringe then conservative.

The average Lincolnite politically loves high local taxes (they love tax increases). The average Lincolnite is vehemently anti-gay, anti-choice on abortion rights. They also believe in marriage is solely for the purpose of pro-creation and people have a duty to have many, many babies. Another example of the fiscal leftism/social extreme conservative way of Lincoln is the high-schools here subsidise women who have lots of babies before they graduate with child care because they feel like a women might as well start her reproductive duties early. Just a strange, strange place politically probubly even more unique then some of the beliefs people hold in rural Utah

Whats ironic about Lincoln politics is that the average Lincolnite is very, very socially conservative but they have no problem with very poor people have many babies. In fact Lincoln encourages very poor people who are struggling to have babies, very ironic political structure with Lincoln being so fiscally far to the left and so socially conservative.

Omaha on the other hand is very moderate politically. People tend to be moderate socially and fiscally in Omaha. Omaha for the most part is a normal midwestern place politically.

Omahans seem to have logical mainstream political beliefs, while Lincolnites have extreme fringe political beliefs on both fiscal and social issues unlike anywhere else in the country.

Lincoln tries to be a very, very far-left city on fiscal issues while being rabidly socially conservative and it doesnt seem to be working out very well and causes lots of problems. Huge deficits, massive school spending while the city infrastructure rots, people having babies in massive numbers they arent able to take care of so the foster care rate is very high.
It's posts like this and others that help me keep internet forums in their proper perspective. Just like internet polls. Sheesh!
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Old 08-29-2007, 01:56 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,036 times
Reputation: 10
Default Illogical

MattDen,

I must take exception to the conclusions you seem to have drawn from Census numbers. Plains10 is correct that the Census information does not take into account in-migration. Just looking at the number of babies in an area and assuming an abnormally high birth rate is erroneous logic.

I have lived in Lexington about a year and find that what accounts for the high numbers of children has more to do with Lexington's growing reputation as an attractive place for young families to move. According to my research, this fast growth is far outstripping the Census's estimates, which further skews the adult / child ratio because the adult population is severely underestimated.

I suspect most cities would prefer to be on the upward curve of growth rather than a downward curve of decay, to where your assumptions about birth numbers may be leading you.

Thanks,
CityDude
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Old 08-30-2007, 11:34 AM
 
482 posts, read 2,038,321 times
Reputation: 196
CityDude

MattDen is no longer with us. He was kicked off of this forum.
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Old 08-30-2007, 01:10 PM
 
Location: IN
20,795 posts, read 35,862,220 times
Reputation: 13235
Quote:
Originally Posted by CityDude View Post
MattDen,

I must take exception to the conclusions you seem to have drawn from Census numbers. Plains10 is correct that the Census information does not take into account in-migration. Just looking at the number of babies in an area and assuming an abnormally high birth rate is erroneous logic.

I have lived in Lexington about a year and find that what accounts for the high numbers of children has more to do with Lexington's growing reputation as an attractive place for young families to move. According to my research, this fast growth is far outstripping the Census's estimates, which further skews the adult / child ratio because the adult population is severely underestimated.

I suspect most cities would prefer to be on the upward curve of growth rather than a downward curve of decay, to where your assumptions about birth numbers may be leading you.

Thanks,
CityDude
What is contributing to the rapid gain in the population of Lexington? If I remember correctly I thought their was a lot of commercial agriculture and industry there along with a high percentage of Hispanics compared with the rest of Nebraska? The tri-cities area is growing, but most of the growth in population in the future for Nebraska will be concentrated in the Omaha and Lincoln metro areas.
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Old 12-01-2007, 03:14 AM
 
8 posts, read 20,872 times
Reputation: 10
Default progressive?

Omaha is growing by leaps and bounds compaired to the rest of the area, 150 miles. Progressive? maybe in the social sciences. My company is looking to expand. It seems that Omaha is not interested in expansion of the airport. They were contacted through various channels..feelers with no responce. doubling air traffic to DAL, ATL, CHI, CIN, DEN, & SLC. and becoming a mini hub, flights from north platte, lincon, sioux city, Sioux Falls, Demoine, Cedar Rapids, Quad cities, joplin, KC, Witcha falls, Pierre, Colimbia, Spring field, Minot, and Fargo. Think of the income tax revs and moneys made and spent in the locial economy. I bet Lincoln would have loved that opp.
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