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Old 12-03-2012, 08:08 PM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties
6,390 posts, read 7,637,612 times
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Your statement did not indicate knowledge of the name of the range on the East shore, if you had known, you would not have made the statement. I will add one range, the Verdi Range, all are on the California border, there are no bears in any range in the interior of Nevada, only in the ranges which connect to the Sierra.

A very lost bear was seen some years ago in Nixon.
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Old 12-03-2012, 08:20 PM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,302 posts, read 12,189,151 times
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You can just call a wildlife biologist from the site provided for hunting licenses, and ask where the largest concentrations of them are, and if they have any tips for night vision cameras. They have to catch cougars every now and then to tag them, so they'll know plenty about how to do it.

Other than that, I'd say to find a deer herd and ascertain which direction it's drifting in. Set the cameras to the rear of the herd, eventually at least one cougar should trail them.
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Old 12-04-2012, 01:32 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
12,686 posts, read 31,835,783 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by .highnlite View Post
Your statement did not indicate knowledge of the name of the range on the East shore, if you had known, you would not have made the statement. I will add one range, the Verdi Range, all are on the California border, there are no bears in any range in the interior of Nevada, only in the ranges which connect to the Sierra.

A very lost bear was seen some years ago in Nixon.
No, I knew the Carson Range and just didn't want get picky about it and look to see if the Sweetwater was where I thought it was. I believe you know that both are partly in California and Nevada, and the bears don't care. At least I think the Carson is in both states; I know the Sweetwater is. But my point is Nevada bears are only in the Sierras, but their range is on both sides of the border.

I used to live in Reno, have been a Nevada resident for 48 years, and have spent a lot of time at Tahoe as well as most other parts of the state except I've never been to the Sheldon Wildlife Range. I've never seen a bear in the Sierras even on four day back packing trips, but they make the news quite often, even in the south, when they wonder into people territory. I was also against the proposed hunt, but don't remember if it went off as planned or was canceled.

I recognize that you know a lot about our state too. Probably more than me in the north. Of course, if the only way you feel you can be right is to make me wrong, then have at it.

About mountain lions ...I think they are better off left alone, and the O/P would be better off leaving them alone.
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Old 12-05-2012, 12:32 AM
 
139 posts, read 324,734 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by .highnlite View Post
You won't see a bear in Nevada, except in and sometimes adjacent to the Carson and Sweetwater Ranges.
loads of bears in Tahoe . there was one recently in Reno .
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Old 12-07-2012, 08:51 PM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties
6,390 posts, read 7,637,612 times
Reputation: 2622
Quote:
But my point is Nevada bears are only in the Sierras, but their range is on both sides of the border.
It is impossible for a Nevada bear to be a Nevada bear and be in the Sierra, at no point is any part of the Sierra Nevada in Nevada.

Whether a bear range crosses the border, or not, does not affect my point, at all.

Quote:
loads of bears in Tahoe . there was one recently in Reno .
Why yes, and what is the name of the mountain range on the Nevada side of Lake Tahoe?

As I mentioned elsewhere, a bear was seen in Nixon, that was a seriously lost bear, not at all native to Pyramid Lake.

What I see here are people arguing my point, yet a look at any map would show that my point is accurate, the only bears in Nevada are in the Carson Range and the Sweetwaters, and of course, the occasional lost bear in Reno, or the one time show in Nixon.

The more important point, which, due to the quibbling stemming from a lack of knowledge of geography, is, why no bears in any of the other 300 odd mountain ranges in Nevada
. True seekers of Nevadiana would jump on that.

A topic of far more interest than why someone thinks a mountain range on the east side of a graben would be the same range as the range on the west side of a graben.
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Old 12-07-2012, 08:54 PM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties
6,390 posts, read 7,637,612 times
Reputation: 2622
If one wants to see a bear, there is no better place than the Tahoe Truckee Dump, except perhaps for the world famous bear feed grounds of the Northstar Dumpster.

Shame you missed the night I poured bacon grease on our barbecue pit just west of the Verdi Range, we had a couple of bears cleaning the grill for us, and looking in the sliding glass doors and making the dogs go berzerk.
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Old 12-08-2012, 02:31 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
12,686 posts, read 31,835,783 times
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I'll give you Sweetwater not being in the Sierra Nevada, but you'd better sign up to make corrections to Wikipedia. According to them, and logic, a part of Nevada is in the Sierra, and the Carson Range is a spur of the Sierra. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sierra_Nevada_(U.S.)

Carson Range - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It only stands to reason that since you can ski from the top of Heavenly into either California or Nevada that you are on the same mountain. And that the Carson Range, including Mt. Rose and Slide, are not separate from the Sierra Range.

I've even heard it said, but don't believe it, that the Spring Mountain Range in Southern Nevada is part of the southern end of the Sierras. I would imagine that whatever epic created the Sierra also created other nearby mountains though.

Anyway, it falls under the heading of "Who Cares?"
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Old 12-08-2012, 10:53 AM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties
6,390 posts, read 7,637,612 times
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Wikipedia is generally fairly accurate, and in this case they are using a layman's description of mountains.

The Sierra Nevada is a distinct granitic batholith, it rises sharply on the East and runs gently down hill to the west. Think of it as a 2x4 tilted at an angle. It runs from near Tehachapi on the south, Olancha Peak being the southern most prominent peak, north to Butt Mountain south of Lassen Peak. It is easily identifiable on the west side of 365 through the Owens Valley, Mammoth, June Lake. Tioga Pass, Sonora Pass, Carson Pass, Echo Summit, Donner Pass, Yuba Pass, mark the crest line with the higher peaks in between.

Nevada is known as the Basin and Range province, that technically is termed Graben and Horst. Horst are the ranges, the dropped blocks delineated on the east and west by faults are called grabens. The Sierra Nevada is a horst, The Carson Range is a horst, Lake Tahoe is a graben filled by water, South Lake Tahoe sits on the graben filled by sediment from the Truckee River, dividing the horst that is the Carson Range from the Sierra. Northstar is a series of volcanoes that blocked the graben, the Truckee/Martis Valley is a graben filled by sediment, separating the Sierra Nevada batholith/horst from the horst of the Carson range south of the Truckee and the Verdi Range north of the Truckee River. Sardine peak another uplift filling the graben, Sierra Valley another graben separating the Sierra from the Bald Mountain Range.

Tahoe and Truckee and Sierra Valley are not 'in' the Sierra Nevada, but, are on the east side of the Sierra Nevada.

The Carson Range, the Verdi Range, the Bald Mountain Range are no more a part of the Sierra Nevada than are the Sweetwaters, Whites and Inyo Range further south.

The Basin and range province, the horsts and graben extend east to the Wasatch in Utah. Looking at a relief map of Nevada, or driving highway 50 to Utah provides graphic evidence of the succession of north south running basins and ranges that are the grabens and horsts, of which the Sierra Nevada and the Wasatch form the west and east boundaries.

To call the Carson range a spur of the Sierra is to ignore geology,

The 'epic' of which you speak is plate tectonics.

Quote:
Anyway, it falls under the heading of "Who Cares?"
Only those who care about the land they walk upon, or those who are curious about their state and their world, or knowledge seekers in general.

If someone does not care, then they should not comment upon posts that they do not care about.

Seems simple to me.

An anecdote, my daughter, after high school did not know what to do with herself, she thought of fashion design, passed up full ride scholarships in soccer to good four year schools to pursue that, then along the way was required to take a general science course, she chose geology, today she is a Junior at the University of Hawaii in Geology, and plans to attend grad school in Geology.

One simple course changed her life. To those of you wondering what to do with yourselves, Geology is infinitely fascinating, a subset of geology, hydrology is a rapidly expanding field with infinite possibilities, especially in a water shy state like Nevada.

Apparently no one's curiosity about their state extends to pondering why there are no bears in Nevada east of the Carson Range. There are bears in Arizona, Utah, Oregon, Idaho, but not Nevada....

Another curious factoid, there are redwoods in Nevada, a little firm, but there they are.
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Old 12-09-2012, 02:54 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
654 posts, read 1,786,686 times
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Bears, bears, bears, and mountain ranges. Maybe if I had started a thread asking for information on bears it would have turned into a debate about mountain lions instead.
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Old 12-09-2012, 07:06 PM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties
6,390 posts, read 7,637,612 times
Reputation: 2622
Lions are common in Nevada, and more common in CA, but, you probably won't see one when you are looking.
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