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Old 12-11-2012, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
656 posts, read 1,791,404 times
Reputation: 795

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Hello all,

I'm a little confused about the term "Right to Work" and our state of Nevada. As I understand it in a "Right to Work" state unions are basically outlawed or someone can take a job but not be forced to join a union. I remember someone telling me that Nevada was a "Right to Work" state and thus I would assume that Nevada wouldn't have a lot of union action. I'm confused b/c I know that here in Las Vegas I'm always hearing about the culinary union being in confrontations w/ some of the casinos. Also when I worked at Kroger in Kentucky and at a hotel in Oregon I was forced to pay union dues w/ the position I held. Both of the jobs were part time and the dues were automatically taken out of my check. I'm not looking for any arguments for or against unions, I'm simply trying to understand the whole concept of a "Right to Work" state. So is the concept of a "Right to Work" state basically saying that if I take a job that has union contracts I'm not forced to join the union in order to take the job? Do I basically have a choice of whether or not to join a union in a "Right to Work" state? Again I'm not looking for any debates for or against unions, I'm just looking to understand the framework.
THX
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Old 12-11-2012, 07:35 PM
 
1,058 posts, read 1,789,253 times
Reputation: 1372
Right to work means you do not have to join the union.
Employment at will means hire/fire/quit at will
Nevada is both
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Old 12-11-2012, 08:09 PM
 
613 posts, read 1,002,229 times
Reputation: 1209
'Right to work' means you have no union protection and the employers can pay you whatever they want, which is almost always the least they can possibly get away with. I love how they put a 'positive spin' on the term.. which makes it sound like it's in your favor. It really should be called 'Right to be exploited'.
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Old 12-12-2012, 07:52 AM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties
6,390 posts, read 7,653,690 times
Reputation: 2622
Think of it as "Right to be fired at any time for any thing."
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Old 12-12-2012, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Kingman AZ
15,371 posts, read 34,644,612 times
Reputation: 9015
Quote:
Originally Posted by opalminor View Post
'Right to work' means you have no union protection and the employers can pay you whatever they want, which is almost always the least they can possibly get away with. I love how they put a 'positive spin' on the term.. which makes it sound like it's in your favor. It really should be called 'Right to be exploited'.
Bull Crackers....Right to work mens NO SUCH THING.

It means that the choice is yours,

You do not have to join a union unless YOU elect to and if there is a Union in the house then a non-union worker will be paid the same scale as the union worker.

Unions abound in Nevada. Culinary, Teamsters, Carpenters etc. I truly hate it when unknowing and uninformed posted spew out this DRECK [my new favorite word]

I drove a cab for 8 years in the 70's as a NON-UNION [read SCAB] driver working for a UNION [teamsters] company. I was NEVER forced to consider a Union and was ALWAYS at the same payscale as the Union Drvers.

I have worked directly in the Hospitality for 25 years before retirement. In our hotel we had the presence of the Culinary Union, and the Teamsters Union and at NO time was there a problem....

We also had Teamsters that represented the Front Desk, Reservations, and PBX personel. They were DECERTIFIED in all three departments and the employees continued to receive the same benefits as when they were Union.
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Old 12-12-2012, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
12,686 posts, read 31,879,974 times
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People confuse "Right to Work" laws with "At Will" laws. In Nevada we have both. "Right to Work", as others have said, means you don't have to join the union if you don't want to. In reality, I was once told by the boss at the Union Plaza Hotel, that if I didn't go down to the Culinary and join up he'd have to let me go because they were threatening to picket. That was a long time ago. It is illegal to do that, of course, but I wonder how many businesses are still intimidated into it by unions? I wouldn't be surprised if it is still happening.

"At will" employment means there is no contract between employer and employee, so that either one can end the relationship at any time with or without a reason. They don't need a reason to let you go - you don't need a reason to quit without notice. Read about it here: At-will employment - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"Wrongful Termination" is something else also, and is hard to prove, but employers should document the reason(s) they let you go, and keep their mouths shut.
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Old 12-12-2012, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Pahrump, NV
2,201 posts, read 2,974,931 times
Reputation: 1972
I grew up in a union household - my dad was IBEW electrician. As a computer geek working in the casinos, I was quite surprised to find that just about every other department had a union except us. I'm now working for the County & yes I did join the union. I wasn't forced. I can leave at anytime. Those who are not part of the union get the exact same benefits/pay as those that are part of the union. The main benefit to joining? My voice is heard when it comes time for contract decisions - changes to our health benefits, furlow days, how much time off we accumulate, etc....I have a voice in the decision making process.
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Old 12-12-2012, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Cold Springs, NV
4,575 posts, read 9,636,722 times
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Having just purchased a home here in Northern Nevada in June of 2011, and retired from the Northern California Carpenters after 33 years I may be able to answer this question. I taught apprenticeship for 5 years, and have a good understanding of the labor struggle in America. While I'm sure to be biased, make no mistake that the battle between Labor & Management is as old as mankind!

Pro = Right to work: No one should be forced to join a union as condition of employment.

Con = Right to work: Dues paying members are burdened with the costs of supporting non-dues paying members, and less financing of the union weakens it's ability to negotiate with management.

IMHO, Pro (management, or their Representatives) right to work advocates use what sounds as a reasonable argument to weaken unions overall lowering wages, and benefits for all (including non-union) covered by such law.

Example of negative effects of choosing not to belong to collective Bargaining agreement ( a union): The Governor of Nevada recently froze all wages, and benefits of prison guards in Nevada that don't pay dues. While he couldn't do this for dues paying members. This makes it a nightmare for the union. How do they separate medical, retirement, and other benefits when the dues paying members get their raise and non-paying members don't. The extra costs for this are borne by the dues paying members, and non dues paying members get no raise. A lose, lose for all.

All in all IMHO, right to work laws are just not worth it. While choice sounds good, it is really a weakening tactic that lowers wages for all. Right to work states have the lowest wages on average of all the states in the nation, and the least benefits. You would think that lower wages would bring business rushing into Nevada, but with the highest unemployment in the nation we know this not to be true.
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Old 12-12-2012, 03:33 PM
 
1,071 posts, read 1,595,341 times
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I spent my working life in a non- Right to Work state where I was required to join the respective union. So, every job I had during my working life, I was in a union. I could never understand how it works in a Right to Work state either as to me, if one is not required to join the union, it seemed to dilute the overall purpose of having effective union representation in the first place. I witnessed many of my union brothers and sisters having their jobs saved through union arbitration because of the employer attempting to fire them unfairly. I don't think that could have happened in an open shop. When I look back on it, I'm grateful to have worked in a non- Right to Work state for almost forty years. I don't think that either wages or benefits both while working and when retired couldn't have come close to those in a Right to Work state. But I'm not suppose to be bringing up the pros and cons of being in a union so I'll stop here.

Right to Work states almost coincide with political lines as red states are mostly Right to Work and the liberal blue states are not. Most notably are the extremely democratic states of California, Massachusetts, Washington, Oregon, etc. and up until now, Michigan being strong union states. Democrats equal pro labor and Republicans equal pro -big business and good economic and income growth for their state. So for the little guy --worker-- being in a non- Right to Work state represents better protection and perhaps, better wages and benefits. But for business and growth of those businesses, better to be in a Right to Work state?
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Old 12-13-2012, 12:07 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
656 posts, read 1,791,404 times
Reputation: 795
I understand a lot better now the definition of a "Right to Work" state and the definition of "At will." I've worked for a few of the major casino companies here in Las Vegas. They all have their typical orientation where they make you sit there and tell you "what a dream come true" the job is going to be. However, I remember one company specifically had some presentation in their orientation that I could tell was meant to deter us from joining a union or trying to form one. Again I'm not going to argue for or against unions, but now that you all have explained the concept of the laws I understand better. Thank you.
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