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Old 05-21-2013, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Sierraville
211 posts, read 269,166 times
Reputation: 202

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrWillys View Post
Mount Rose is part of the Carson range which is a spur of the Sierra Nevada. I believe the Sweetwater range is another spur.

Funny Buzz, you came from the mountain state, to the most mountainous state.
Well, no. The Sierra Nevada is a tilted fault block, you can trace the fault which created the Sierra easily at Lake Tahoe, it runs along the base of the rises. Let us start opposite of the Sweetwaters at Bishop . 395 uses the trough that lies between the Horst of the Sierra Nevada and the Horst of the Sweet Waters, that trough is called a graben. We continue north finding the horst graben boundary marked by faults at at Silver Creek and the South Fork Carson River, Pleasant Valley Creek, Grover Hot Springs,, the east base of Carson Pass, the east base of Echo Summit, Emerald Bay, DL Bliss State park, and running along the west shore to Tahoe City and 89 north to Truckee.

Tahoe is a graben, South Lake Tahoe is built on the filled in graben, the lake the unfilled graben, the graben is plugged on the north side by the volcanoes of Northstar. At Truckee the fault retreats west ward to the west end of Donner Lake and north from there, Martis Valley, Stampede, Boca etc exist in the filled in graben north of Northstar, and it is plugged on the north by the volcano of Sardine Peak. The Sierra Nevada Fault runs along the west edge of Sierra Valley, the uplift is easily noticed here.

The Carson Range and the Sweetwater Range and the Verdi Range are distinct horsts, separated from the Sierra Nevada by grabens. The alternating horst graben sequence extends east from the Sierra clear to the Wasatch, the horst graben sequence is also known as range and basin. Driving Hiway 50 from Carson city it is pretty easy to demark the basin and range sequence.


The Carson Range and the Sweetwaters are not a spur of the Sierra, they are the far side of the dropped arch graben.
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Old 05-21-2013, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Cold Springs, NV
4,575 posts, read 9,595,936 times
Reputation: 5035
The USGS thinks otherwise:

"Truckee Meadows is
bordered on the west by the Carson Range, a spur of the Sierra
Nevada Range"

Quoted from here:
http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/1781/pdf/pp1781_section3.pdf

A similar comment is made about the Sweetwaters North of Bridgeport.
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Old 05-21-2013, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Sierraville
211 posts, read 269,166 times
Reputation: 202
A simple thank you would do, I explained very clearly that they were not, and I explained why they were not. If you can ignore my simple clear explanation of why they are not spurs of the Sierra Nevada, then my friend, you are a very special person.

I suggest taking a basic Geology course at TMCC.
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Old 05-21-2013, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Cold Springs, NV
4,575 posts, read 9,595,936 times
Reputation: 5035
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierravillian View Post
A simple thank you would do, I explained very clearly that they were not, and I explained why they were not. If you can ignore my simple clear explanation of why they are not spurs of the Sierra Nevada, then my friend, you are a very special person.

I suggest taking a basic Geology course at TMCC.
So you're claiming that you're smarter than the USGS? I understand what you're basing you're criteria on, but it is more than geology that defines the great Sierra Nevada. It is far in excess of the large granite formations, or kin too. I will stick with what the majority in the educated world believe, and my teaching credentials in both Nevada, and California have taught me!

You're bias is quite clear in wanting to define it entirely in my home state, but the majority of educated facts prove otherwise. I can understand Buzz complaining that Wikipedia is not fool proof, but I'll accept the USGS way before some guy who lives in Hooterville, and brags of an underrated JC in a small metropolis.

I've crested summits from Whitney to Lassen, and they all vary in the geology that created them. You're narrow window would shrink what most understand to at least 25% of its current understanding. Lassen is not large formations of granite, and Whitney, Conness, and Mount Rose are only a form of.
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Old 05-22-2013, 12:59 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
12,686 posts, read 31,817,523 times
Reputation: 5406
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrWillys View Post
Mount Rose is part of the Carson range which is a spur of the Sierra Nevada. I believe the Sweetwater range is another spur.

Funny Buzz, you came from the mountain state, to the most mountainous state.
I hate to live anywhere that doesn't have mountains ...whatever some blowhard calls them.
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Old 05-22-2013, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Sierraville
211 posts, read 269,166 times
Reputation: 202
...
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrWillys View Post
So you're claiming that you're smarter than the USGS? (Remember Professor Whitney and of course, the great fibber, Clarence King) I understand what you're basing you're criteria on, but it is more than geology that defines the great Sierra Nevada. It is far in excess of the large granite formations, or kin too. I will stick with what the majority in the educated world believe, and my teaching credentials in both Nevada, and California have taught me!

A teaching credential should indicate an ability to accept facts. If you want to define the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range as a cultural or vegetative thing, feel free. But, don't call that geology.

Let me illustrate another example. From the Sierra to the Wasatch are a series of arches, all with the center dropped out of them. Take a look at this image of an arch bridge, now, drop the center out of it. On the left is the Sierra, on the right is the Carson Range, can anyone rationally state the Carson range is a spur of the Sierra?



You're bias is quite clear in wanting to define it entirely in my home state, but the majority of educated facts prove otherwise. I can understand Buzz complaining that Wikipedia is not fool proof, but I'll accept the USGS way before some guy who lives in Hooterville, and brags of an underrated JC in a small metropolis.

I gave you facts, not opinion, the majority of "educated facts" agree with me, geology seldom lies. Now, "some guy who lives in Hooterville" is probably what Professor Whitney said about John Muir when Muir published his research showing that Yosemite Valley was formed by glaciers, and Professor Whitney of the USGS !!! believed it was formed by a cataclysm.

Now back to critical thinking skills. If you can show the dear reader that I bragged about a JC anywhere, let me know. Otherwise the dear reader would think your critical thinking skills are falling a bit short of the mark.

Curiously, my daughter is at this very day, mapping the Poleta faults
on the east side of the White Mountains ( I trust you know the range, another horst) in Deep Springs Valley (another graben), a very cool, and little understood complex with her University group, and no, it is not UNR. Her professor has had to ask her to let some of the other students answer questions, as she is so far ahead of the others, because she has wandered the horst graben complex between the Sierra Nevada and the Wasatch with her old man all her life.

I've crested summits from Whitney to Lassen, and they all vary in the geology that created them. This is patently untrue, or at best, they differ minutely. All the peaks on the Sierra Batholith are the result of the uplift, the same geology tilted the entire block from south of Olancha to the northern most edge of the batholith at **** Mountain followed by glacial carving.

You're [your]narrow window would shrink what most understand to at least 25% of its current understanding. This sentence makes no sense. Lassen is not large formations of granite, and Whitney, Conness, and Mount Rose are only a form of. This sentence does appear to have ended a bit sooner than it should have.

One who has done this, and represents themselves as knowledgeable on the Sierra, should have paid attention to the geology. Whitney (or Fisherman's Peak as it should be called) and Conness are part of the Sierra Batholith. Mount Rose is not. (by the way, a reasonable ski tour is to leave from Mt Rose parking lot, ascend Rose and strike north along the ridgeline coming out at Boomtown)

Stating that Lassen Peak is not a large formation of granite is much like stating the moon is not made of green cheese, however, the only major difference between rhyolite and granite is that one is extrusive and one is intrusive. You can see the northernmost peak of the Sierra Nevada, the northeast corner of the Sierra batholith) from Lassen Peak. I will leave that for you to name, being so knowledgeable on the Sierra and all.

But (there was a hint for you) my beef is this, your statement was challenged by me, you reacted emotionally and got snarky. You did not say to yourself, here is a chance for me to expand my knowledge, you dug your heels in, and defended an undefensible position, kinda like Colonel Custer. I recommend that you consider what I wrote, and if you can factually and unemotionally show me in error, go for it.


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Old 05-22-2013, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Cold Springs, NV
4,575 posts, read 9,595,936 times
Reputation: 5035
Okay, you win, you're smarter than everyone, and including the USGS.
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Old 05-22-2013, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Sierraville
211 posts, read 269,166 times
Reputation: 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrWillys View Post
Okay, you win, you're smarter than everyone, and including the USGS.
A silly statement. Smart and educated are two different things. If you indeed have teaching credentials, you should know this well. I could be as dumb as a rock, but, apparently I know more about geology than a few others.

I gave you clear, simple, statements on the horst graben complex. You won't argue those, you are trying to attack me.

Address my facts, not me.

Stating that you have multiple teaching credentials as a statement of your knowledge of geology does not work. You could have multiple teaching credentials in elementary ed, or history, or math, none of those qualifies you as an authority on geology.

I make my living on geology. I tend to have a pretty good grasp.

I tell you what, I will read your link, see if I can see where the author went wrong....,mmmm read it.

Jena is a hydrologist, not a geologist, still she should have known better, since she does understand the basin part of basin and range. She has another error, she calls Steamboat Creek the Truckee River's largest tributary. It isn't.

She has another error 2 actually in one sentence.
Quote:
Fur trading expeditions arrived in the basin in the 1820s and army expeditions began
coming through Truckee Meadows en route to Sacramento,
California in the 1840s.
And another error:
Quote:
Wagon trains followed the Truckee River Trail to California
over what was to be called Donner Pass in the Sierra Nevada
Her very own geologic map does not support her contention that the Carson Range is a spur of the Sierra, as it states it is composed of Volcanic rock and metamorphics, with some intrusive. Whereas the Sierra batholith is intrusive rock, uplifted.

You never got back to me on the northernmost peak of the Sierra Batholith. But (I just gave you another hint) you can still work it out.

The very term batholith should be a clue to you that there would be no spurs.

Now, once again, you have a choice, you can get emotional and snarky, or, you can consider this a time to increase your knowledge.

Last edited by Sierravillian; 05-22-2013 at 12:43 PM..
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Old 05-22-2013, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
12,686 posts, read 31,817,523 times
Reputation: 5406
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierravillian View Post
A silly statement. Smart and educated are two different things. If you indeed have teaching credentials, you should know this well. I could be as dumb as a rock, but, apparently I know more about geology than a few others.

I gave you clear, simple, statements on the horst graben complex. You won't argue those, you are trying to attack me.

Address my facts, not me.

Stating that you have multiple teaching credentials as a statement of your knowledge of geology does not work. You could have multiple teaching credentials in elementary ed, or history, or math, none of those qualifies you as an authority on geology.

I make my living on geology. I tend to have a pretty good grasp.

I tell you what, I will read your link, see if I can see where the author went wrong....,mmmm read it.

Jena is a hydrologist, not a geologist, still she should have known better, since she does understand the basin part of basin and range. She has another error, she calls Steamboat Creek the Truckee River's largest tributary. It isn't.

She has another error 2 actually in one sentence.And another error: Her very own geologic map does not support her contention that the Carson Range is a spur of the Sierra, as it states it is composed of Volcanic rock and metamorphics, with some intrusive. Whereas the Sierra batholith is intrusive rock, uplifted.

You never got back to me on the northernmost peak of the Sierra Batholith. But (I just gave you another hint) you can still work it out.

The very term batholith should be a clue to you that there would be no spurs.

Now, once again, you have a choice, you can get emotional and snarky, or, you can consider this a time to increase your knowledge.
Not that I didn't learn something here, but as you are so well educated I'm sure you know the meaning of the word "pedantic".
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Old 05-22-2013, 05:52 PM
 
Location: Sierraville
211 posts, read 269,166 times
Reputation: 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzz123 View Post
Not that I didn't learn something here, but as you are so well educated I'm sure you know the meaning of the word "pedantic".
Pedantic does not fit. We have a person, whom for whatever reason has rejected simple facts presented to him/her. The person rejects the facts based on an error filled paper written by a non expert in the field.

I can lead a horse to water, but I cannot make him drink, I can lead a person to learning, but I cannot make him think.

If Mr. Willys is indeed a credentialed teacher, I wonder what he would say if a student told him the Earth was created in 6 days, it says so right here in this book. Would he say, that is fine, persist in your error, or being a good teacher would he attempt to steer the misguided child to the facts.

If that is pedantic, ya got me.
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