U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Nevada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-27-2009, 12:48 PM
 
6 posts, read 17,857 times
Reputation: 11
Post what its like to live in snow?

Need help preparing my family to live in the snow. Never lived there at all. Will be in Incline Village. What do folks do to keep themselves busy during snow season? Love any input from anyone!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-28-2009, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Kingman AZ
15,380 posts, read 22,197,456 times
Reputation: 8536
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6italian View Post
Need help preparing my family to live in the snow. Never lived there at all. Will be in Incline Village. What do folks do to keep themselves busy during snow season? Love any input from anyone!!
They shovel it


Personally....having grown up in sno....snu....snoe.....however you spell it....there is nothing in the world that can prepare you for it. good luck
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2009, 04:23 AM
 
376 posts, read 853,168 times
Reputation: 265
You get used to it. After living almost all my life in the Phoenix area, I moved to norther NV 4 years ago. Snow isnt too bad. Shoveling it stinks, and driving right after it snows before it's plowed can be difficult. Luckily, Ive only got stuck once. This year, we bought snow/ice tires for my wife's minivan and its helped immensly (during what little snow we've had this year). Personally, I now prefer the cold over the heat. Cold is just like the heat. Once you get to a certain leve, it's just cold. For me, once it gets below 0, its just cold, I cant tell the difference between temps once its below that level, just like everything over 110 felt the same when I lived in Phoenix. At least in the cold I can bundle up and stay warm.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-30-2009, 02:03 AM
 
Location: Sheridan, WY
355 posts, read 945,842 times
Reputation: 306
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6italian View Post
Need help preparing my family to live in the snow. Never lived there at all. Will be in Incline Village. What do folks do to keep themselves busy during snow season? Love any input from anyone!!
You get used to shoveling, pushing, dumping, etc.

To further occupy your time, you'll need to learn how to drive in the stuff, and use snow tires and (quite possibly) chains.

Frankly, the snow isn't what would concern me about Incline Village. I'd be worried more about the fire danger in the area. One day, there is going to be a fire in the Tahoe Basin that will lay to waste everything in its path, and no air tankers or ground attack crews will be able to stop it. When that day comes, the number of exits out of the Tahoe Basin are so few that there will be traffic jams and real panic to get out of there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-30-2009, 10:17 PM
 
151 posts, read 486,315 times
Reputation: 51
No isn't THAT a positive, encouraging comment? 6Italian..praying that your faith is strong enough to blow through the above response. People of faith know enough not to panic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2009, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Sheridan, WY
355 posts, read 945,842 times
Reputation: 306
You may not like it, but it is the truth, and I know it to be the truth because I was in attendance at the governor's conference on fire issues after the devastating fires of 1999 in Nevada. The fire crews and chiefs in the Tahoe Basin were there as well, and their own assessment (off the record at that time, of course) was that the fuel loading in the Tahoe Basin is completely out of control and just waiting for the right conditions to create a fire that they will not be able to control.

You don't need to believe me. Look at the results of the Angora Fire. Lots of people lost homes, some with only minutes of notice. They basically had to grab their kids, their pets and flee:

Angora Fire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

And here's the 2002 assessment of fuel loading levels in a nice chart:

Executive Summary - Tahoe-Douglas Fire Plan - Nevada Community Wildfire Risk / Hazard Assessment - RCI

The entire Tahoe Basin is loaded with fuel and ready to go in the right conditions. The way houses are built in among the trees in Incline will make them a write-off when the day of reckoning comes. Worse than just the fuel load in Incline are the steep slopes, which have the ability to create chimney effect firestorms.

Here's all the detailed poop on Incline Village's risks:

http://www.rci-nv.com/reports/northlt/section05.asp


Relative to those concerns, shoveling snow is the least of one's worries. I'm sorry to rain on your parade here, but when you've seen a firestorm in high fuel loading situations (and I have), you realize that modern fire-fighting equipment is no match for the threat.

Last edited by NVDave; 04-01-2009 at 10:44 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-02-2009, 02:21 PM
 
59 posts, read 243,530 times
Reputation: 94
Back to the original post; I've lived in "snow country" (the mountains) for most of my life. Rule #1....try and get the warmest, most efficient fireplace. It's a special warmth gas and electric fail to give. A good, reasonably priced firewood connection is also desireable.

Rule #2....don't let the snow build up around your primary entry/exit doors. It will melt slightly and resoldify to something resembling iron or concrete (not to mention turning invisible and getting dangerously slippery). Keep your main walkways cleared off to the ground. That's as stable as you'll get in wintertime. Start snow removal in the morning, when it's still soft and fresh. The longer it sits, the denser it gets...and much more difficult to remove.

Rule #3....get everyone a decent set of shoes with slip-resistant soles. It'll help prevent a real nasty slip-and-fall accident in the ice. Snowboots are more costly, but it'll keep feet warmer, drier and anchored to the icy ground.

Rule #4....invest in two types of snow shovel. One with a steel blade (preferably) and a straight handle for chopping ice and snow. The other shovel should have the ergonomic modified "S" twist (with teflon coating) for normal, everyday snow removal without having to stoop over, risking pulled muscles and back aches. Also, use car wax (it's more durable) and apply to both blades of these shovels, front and back. It will prevent snow and ice from sticking to the blades as you work. It works like a charm! Snow glides off like magic.

Rule #5....keep any exposed wood decking clear of snow. Heavy snow build-up and remelting will gradually undermine deck paint/varnish, resulting in very costly repair and renovation come warmer weather. (Use a heavy-duty plastic shovel for this job so you won't gouge the wood). Also, most wood decking will incur various degrees of warpage and/or settling...again, costly damage repair.

Rule #6...do indeed get yourself snowtires and/or snow chains. And keep them in your car the entire winter. Sometimes they're the perfect item for a safe drive on ice or snow, and you can't put a price on that. (My first winter in the mountains, I slid right off the road, on a curve, and was only saved by a small, eight foot pinetree that kept my car from rolling down a steep hillside! My heart was in my throat. I thought I was going to die. Don't underestimate good traction in snow country!)

Rule #7....carefully observe your surroundings when outside. Too easy to stumble or slip on ice patches. Black ice (clear, remelted ice) is almost unavoidable on roads and walkways, especially in shaded areas.


I could go on, but you get the general idea! (I've lived in snow country for most of my life, so I know "the deal" pretty well). Things like a good ice scraper for your car windows are essential, dress in layers, etc. Otherwise, get some fun games, books and/or DVD's and plenty of food so on those heavy snow days, everyone will enjoy the situation with reasonable comfort.

Enjoy Incline Village! It's one of the nicer areas around Lake Tahoe. (P.S. Watch that slope down to the stoplight on the edge of town! It's often in shade, and treacherous as hell if you approach too rapidly in snow. Allow ample time and space for slowing and stopping vehicles).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-02-2009, 02:36 PM
 
59 posts, read 243,530 times
Reputation: 94
Almost forgot...take care when out walking in snow to KEEP YOUR HANDS OUT OF YOUR POCKETS! You'll probably have gloves, but the tendency for the "greenhorn" new-comer to the snow to put your hands in your pockets invites a very nasty spill, should you suddenly slip!

I developed this "philosophy" during my first few years in snow country. You won't be able to get your hands out of your pockets quick enough to prevent landing on your head, or butt. You can test this concept for yourself...but I don't advise it!

And when the inevitable slip DOES arrive, lower your center of gravity and hunch as close to the ground as you have time for, and ease your "descent" with one or both hands. Better to risk busting a wrist or arm than your head or pelvis.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2009, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Sheridan, WY
355 posts, read 945,842 times
Reputation: 306
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nature Guy View Post
Almost forgot...take care when out walking in snow to KEEP YOUR HANDS OUT OF YOUR POCKETS! You'll probably have gloves, but the tendency for the "greenhorn" new-comer to the snow to put your hands in your pockets invites a very nasty spill, should you suddenly slip!
You know, that's very, very true. I never thought about this, because I grew up in snowy winters and falling on my butt all the time. But you're right -- if you've got your hands stuffed deep in your pockets, it's gonna hurt. This is one of those things that people in snow learn at a young age - ie, don't keep your hands in your pockets, and take the spoon out of the hot cocoa before drinking. Both are done to prevent painful injuries.

BTW -- one of the things I've learned as I've gotten older is to not always try to not fall. The consequences to one's back can be worse by trying to go to extreme lengths to prevent a fall (usually by grabbing onto something as you're going down) than by simply getting prepared on the way down (as you suggest) and taking a hit to your pride.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-08-2009, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Historic Central Phoenix
652 posts, read 1,544,249 times
Reputation: 359
Get a winter hobby. Snow isn't bad if you enjoy it by doing something like downhill skiing or snowboarding.

In my opinion, the worst part of winter is the darkness. I can handle everything else but I don't like it getting dark at 5pm.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Nevada
Similar Threads
View detailed profiles of:

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top