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Old 07-24-2007, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Sunset Mountain
1,385 posts, read 1,855,690 times
Reputation: 1298
Default Working for a living

Hi folks. I have been scouting from my pc as much as I can about finding a job after relocating from Illinois back home to New Hampshire.

Without having to get too personal, can some of you possibly tell me what your professions are?

For example: I'm a banker, but haven't been able to get hired at any local banks in any local towns here in the southern part of Illinois, so in order to pay bills, I work for my mother in-law at the local deli. I believe someone said in another thread to watch out in small towns. It's who you know that gets the jobs you want. I found that to be particularly true here. I have a few years of college education which doesn't seem to matter anywhere w/out that final degree. (I simply couldn't afford to finish at the rate my college was charging).

This job is one of those minimum wage extravaganzas and doesn't pay to live here even though my rent is only $250.00 per month.

14 years ago I had no trouble finding jobs in the area especially through a temp agency, however, I see more and more credit reports being asked of me for applications on apartments, jobs, etc. out of NH.

I wonder, if you had $10,000 to relocate to NH, not really have a nice money making profession or a degree; how would you go about doing it? I think most of my money would be spent on a place to live, but at the rate up there, it won't last long. I'd be hard pressed to find a job very quickly.

Do any of you work a lower wage profession and still earn enough salary to survive up there?

Thanks for your time
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Old 07-24-2007, 09:24 AM
 
2,722 posts, read 3,157,553 times
Reputation: 2890
Job: Unemployed

Been looking for the past 6 months. Dont worry, I'm not collecting unemployment. Filing for unemployment is a job in itself. I'd rather spend that time job hunting.
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Old 07-24-2007, 03:06 PM
 
6,764 posts, read 13,605,806 times
Reputation: 4466
Unfortunately it's a reality that there aren't a lot great paying jobs out there, even WITH a degree. Think of how many teachers they churn out from college and grad school each year, while how few actually retire. I've been waiting since '89 for THAT job market to open up.

My husband has a lot of shipping and receiving experience yet has only been called for about 3 jobs all paying a lot less than he makes now (and we can't even make it here on his pay).

Maybe go temp? Then you can possibly get a foot in the door.
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Old 07-24-2007, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Texas- moving back to New England!
556 posts, read 44,501 times
Reputation: 132
If I were you, I'd plan a vacation with whatever time off you get for that purpose for the year, and take a trip to NH and have a look around. In the meanwhile, you can get newspaper subscriptions to the major and minor cities in the area of the state you are interested in sent to your house to read up on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katlakat View Post
Hi folks. I have been scouting from my pc as much as I can about finding a job after relocating from Illinois back home to New Hampshire.

Without having to get too personal, can some of you possibly tell me what your professions are?

For example: I'm a banker, but haven't been able to get hired at any local banks in any local towns here in the southern part of Illinois, so in order to pay bills, I work for my mother in-law at the local deli. I believe someone said in another thread to watch out in small towns. It's who you know that gets the jobs you want. I found that to be particularly true here. I have a few years of college education which doesn't seem to matter anywhere w/out that final degree. (I simply couldn't afford to finish at the rate my college was charging).

This job is one of those minimum wage extravaganzas and doesn't pay to live here even though my rent is only $250.00 per month.

14 years ago I had no trouble finding jobs in the area especially through a temp agency, however, I see more and more credit reports being asked of me for applications on apartments, jobs, etc. out of NH.

I wonder, if you had $10,000 to relocate to NH, not really have a nice money making profession or a degree; how would you go about doing it? I think most of my money would be spent on a place to live, but at the rate up there, it won't last long. I'd be hard pressed to find a job very quickly.

Do any of you work a lower wage profession and still earn enough salary to survive up there?

Thanks for your time
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Old 07-24-2007, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Sunset Mountain
1,385 posts, read 1,855,690 times
Reputation: 1298
Thanks for the replies-Sounds like I have my work cut out for me quite a bit. I wish you all luck in finding your jobs that you can enjoy. And thanks Torrey for the advice

I will definitely try temp agencies and see how it goes.
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Old 07-30-2007, 08:10 AM
 
Location: a nation in decline
10,231 posts, read 10,431,622 times
Reputation: 3880
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katlakat View Post
Thanks for the replies-Sounds like I have my work cut out for me quite a bit. I wish you all luck in finding your jobs that you can enjoy. And thanks Torrey for the advice

I will definitely try temp agencies and see how it goes.

Hi Katlakat - temp agencies are good! I worked for many years, and some of those jobs I found through temp agencies. One of the best was with an investment firm (not Fidelity, but similar). Once you get your foot in the door, and they like you, you're in. You might try Accountemps for a temp position and see what happens.

With banking experience, I should think you could get some good positions if you think about how you can transfer that experience to other business applications. The only drawback with temp is that there are no benefits and you're opening yourself up to risk without medical insurance, which can then wipe you out in no time.

Consider the insurance field, investments (Fidelity, for example), or financial advisors. In some of these positions you will need to get licences, but the company will generally cover the cost, and it's not hard to do with a little interest and not all that much studying. I wish you well!
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Old 08-01-2007, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Sunset Mountain
1,385 posts, read 1,855,690 times
Reputation: 1298
Wow thanks for all of your replies!

Southward bound, great advice, thanks so much for lifting my spirits! I was reading in a few jobs listed out of a local paper there, credit checks credit checks.

Will having extremely bad credit hinder going to a temp agency? In my experience, they only did a criminal background check for my employment, but if they looked at my credit sheet, it was for mere laughter rather than anything else. LOL

I've been 2+ years w/out any benefits at all. I'd risk a temp job for a while w/out benefits if it meant my first full time job since I left Dallas.

Of course we both got Pneumonia the first year we let our benefits go, but we couldn't help it. Our business did not earn enough profit to outweigh costs, let alone insurance for us both.

I took every bank seminar and opportunity I could, even let them pay for my notary public registration and stamp. I was simply a teller back then

I am soo ready to get boot scootin' outta here! Illinois is lovely, if you're a farmer! LOL Not much work here, only part time minimum wages. All of the banks are full, and the people have been working there since, well, the dawn of time? Hard to get in unless someone retires.

Thanks again so very much!
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Old 08-01-2007, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Montana
10 posts, read 20,791 times
Reputation: 11
Default step one of two...

Perhaps it would make more sense to move to a larger metro area (or nearer to a larger metro area) in New England and try to save up a bit...I know that sounds like an oxymoron but bear with me.

It sounds like you need to do a couple of things: clean up your credit and find a place in NE that will have an acceptable job for you. BTW I don't believe most temp agencies check credit. They are looking for DEPENDABLE people to send out to their clients who will actually show up and work hard. Good hygiene helps . My hubby is a branch mgr for Kelly Services and believe me - that is REAL hard to find.

My rationale here is that if you find a larger city - perhaps Portland - chances are there will be MANY more temp and temp-to-perm situations. While living so much closer you can investigate, search and drive to potential interviews and desirable towns. We are finding that most employers won't even consider an out-of-state candidate which is a bummer.

Finding a low-cost living situation may be a bit tough (check out Craig's list) but I think it will be harder to find employment in smaller towns than finding cheap housing in bigger towns. With your credit rating, acknowledge it and offer to give a larger deposit, if necessary.

For what it is worth, we have paid our own benefits for 2 years. We have two children and we are all in good health. It costs $330 month. It does not cover maternity which is a huge increase.

I'm rambling....
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Old 08-01-2007, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Sunset Mountain
1,385 posts, read 1,855,690 times
Reputation: 1298
Nah thx wonder, no rambles, good info!

I have been weighing the cost of cleaning my credit. Unfortunately, it means staying here in $250 per month box apartment for a few years. If hubby does start this management job in November, it means 4x the salary we have earned this one year combined. Hard offer to pass up.

If I were to pay off the debt my 1st husband accrued, the repossessed car, and the medical bills, I would be working three jobs until I was aprox 50 years old. If I live that long. Its quite a mess. We're talking straight out of college, perfect credit, two credit cards, that he wonderfully signed my name and upped the amount each time to over $200,000. Then bought electronics and had them stay over seas with his navy buddy, who in turn brought them home in small bundles each time, and then he sold them here. By the time I found out, (This was back in 1995?) the damage was irreversible. The courts said he had to pay half, which was basically a joke. I could put judgments out on him, but that didn't seem to make him pay anything on them, when he has no money either. This was all before most credit card frauds were even happening on a regular basis. At the tender age of 22, I just didn't know what to do, and now that 10 years have passed, I still can't even get a car loan.

Ahh well, and so it goes. I don't mind paying hundreds of thousands of dollars on things I never saw or bought, to clean up a credit report-but, to what end? I already live paycheck to paycheck, and frankly, I can't live on hot dogs forever at this rate. You catch my drift

I think your suggestion about a larger place for work is a good one. I love the idea of a small town life, but it sounds expensive. Maybe I'll hit a run of good luck-I have family up there, maybe I should give them a call?

OH! Now I'm rambling!!!! Bah!!
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Old 08-01-2007, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
4,029 posts, read 7,645,169 times
Reputation: 3290
Kat,
You should definitely consider contacting the National Foundation for Credit Counseling. They can tell you what is the most important to pay back or ask for a settlement, for pennies on the dollar. Guess what? It does work! There may even be things on your credit history that are almost ready to "drop off" and will no longer damage your rating. Seriously, a credit advisor could probably help you with this!!

I think I listed this site before; Welcome to NFCC!, and their phone number is 1-800-388-2227

I went to a 1st time home buyer seminar (one meant for buyers, not realtors) and I was surprised at how much I learned! For instance, did you know that your credit score may affect how much you pay for car insurance? I didn't!

The fact is that you shouldn't have to live on hotdogs, or pay back things that you had nothing to do with. 10 years is a long time to live with bad credit, and I do know that even on a rental, most landlords do a credit check.

Feel free to send me a PM to let me know how all this goes for you.
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