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Old 12-16-2011, 01:46 PM
 
3,201 posts, read 2,536,878 times
Reputation: 1456
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajl22586 View Post
If you want cookie-cutter homes stay away from NH (and all the better for the state). What you can expect to find in NH are mostly slightly older colonial or cape homes with real character and charm. Yes, many do lack some of the conveniences of the homes that are typical of newer developments, but I'm fairly confident that the population would rather keep the quaintness of the place rather than have suburban sprawl. I'd venture to say that would be "anti-NH."

OP, with all due respect I'd suggest you scratch NH off your list based on your preferences.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Interesting. I live only a few miles from one of the largest cities in the state, live on a lake, surrounded by my 40 acres of forest. There are only 5 houses on my street, and the rest of the lake is protected by conservation land. I can be in a Hannafords or Walmart or dozens of other stores within minutes, yet basically no one even knows we live here. All the houses on this street are custom. If I worked in Boston, the Boston Express would have me there in no time (or at least I could do work on the way, with WiFi).
My neighbor's house is all brick, on 16 acres, 6 car garage... etc...
It all depends where you look for a house.
Personally, cities like Manchester, Nashua and Derry give me the heebie-jeebies (especially if you look at the crime rates).

IMHO, this is how to have your cake, and eat it too.

 
Old 12-16-2011, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Northern Ontario, Canada
197 posts, read 152,894 times
Reputation: 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSparkle928 View Post
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Interesting. I live only a few miles from one of the largest cities in the state, live on a lake, surrounded by my 40 acres of forest. There are only 5 houses on my street, and the rest of the lake is protected by conservation land. I can be in a Hannafords or Walmart or dozens of other stores within minutes, yet basically no one even knows we live here. All the houses on this street are custom. If I worked in Boston, the Boston Express would have me there in no time (or at least I could do work on the way, with WiFi).
My neighbor's house is all brick, on 16 acres, 6 car garage... etc...
It all depends where you look for a house.
Personally, cities like Manchester, Nashua and Derry give me the heebie-jeebies (especially if you look at the crime rates).

IMHO, this is how to have your cake, and eat it too.
Sorry but I'm a bit confused. Why did you quote me when you wrote this?
 
Old 12-16-2011, 02:39 PM
 
87 posts, read 125,253 times
Reputation: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajl22586 View Post
Sorry but I'm a bit confused. Why did you quote me when you wrote this?
I think he is probably trying to make a point that there are wonderful homes and disagreeing your comment about scratching off NH..


Now all of you:

I actually love the fact that there are no cookie cutter homes. I love the individualism and that is one of the things that keeps getting me attracted to NH. I love the state attitude in general. But financially speaking, what I am used to in terms of home interior preferences and even exterior (to some degree), is way too expensive. That is what I am trying to figure out, why.

I Like what supersparkle said :
I live only a few miles from one of the largest cities in the state, live on a lake, surrounded by my 40 acres of forest. There are only 5 houses on my street, and the rest of the lake is protected by conservation land."

I think this is wonderful. I live in a similar place.. surrounded by hundred+ acers of curvy / hilly roads and protected forests/parks. Great to bike in summer.. 10 minutes from a lake where you can go Kayak.. An hour from DE beaches.. The one exception: Homes are not that expensive like in NH. I think some would consider 400k for a home is already high end.. but i am surprised by some of the nature of your replies! Maybe you guys are "rich"!!


Someone else suggested that there are homes with open floor plans and nice architecture. Hope to find one. if anyone knows any specific subdivision or towns that I should look.. please suggest. But 400-450k is my limit.
 
Old 12-16-2011, 02:53 PM
 
3,201 posts, read 2,536,878 times
Reputation: 1456
Quote:
Originally Posted by offmove View Post
I think he is probably trying to make a point that there are wonderful homes and disagreeing your comment about scratching off NH..


Now all of you:

I actually love the fact that there are no cookie cutter homes. I love the individualism and that is one of the things that keeps getting me attracted to NH. I love the state attitude in general. But financially speaking, what I am used to in terms of home interior preferences and even exterior (to some degree), is way too expensive. That is what I am trying to figure out, why.

I Like what supersparkle said :
I live only a few miles from one of the largest cities in the state, live on a lake, surrounded by my 40 acres of forest. There are only 5 houses on my street, and the rest of the lake is protected by conservation land."

I think this is wonderful. I live in a similar place.. surrounded by hundred+ acers of curvy / hilly roads and protected forests/parks. Great to bike in summer.. 10 minutes from a lake where you can go Kayak.. An hour from DE beaches.. The one exception: Homes are not that expensive like in NH. I think some would consider 400k for a home is already high end.. but i am surprised by some of the nature of your replies! Maybe you guys are "rich"!!


Someone else suggested that there are homes with open floor plans and nice architecture. Hope to find one. if anyone knows any specific subdivision or towns that I should look.. please suggest. But 400-450k is my limit.
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Thanks, offmove, for clarifying my last post. There are wonderful homes here in NH, and I wouldn't scratch it off.

I am confident you will find what you are looking for up here.
 
Old 12-16-2011, 03:38 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
2,241 posts, read 4,029,862 times
Reputation: 3763
Quote:
Originally Posted by offmove View Post
I think this is wonderful. I live in a similar place.. surrounded by hundred+ acers of curvy / hilly roads and protected forests/parks. Great to bike in summer.. 10 minutes from a lake where you can go Kayak.. An hour from DE beaches.. The one exception: Homes are not that expensive like in NH. I think some would consider 400k for a home is already high end.. but i am surprised by some of the nature of your replies! Maybe you guys are "rich"!!
Oh, trust me. I'm far from rich! I just think you have to realize that most people in NH don't have the same expectations for big new construction. We're just used to living in older, smaller houses.

To be fair, homes are definitely cheaper the farther you get from the MA border, in general... southern NH is a very desirable place to live both for the access to natural amenities and the access to jobs and cultural amenities near Boston.

The Boston metro area which includes parts of southern NH has the second lowest unemployment rate among the 15 largest metros (after DC), and a lot of people come to look for work near Boston. Many of those jobs are in high-paying industries like biomed and high-tech. The problem is, it's also the oldest major city in the country... the housing stock in this part of New England is very old and there aren't a whole lot of opportunities for new development compared to most other parts of the US. This makes those high-end homes you described very expensive, because they make up an extremely small percentage of the market.

Plus... if you're happy with the natural amenities you have in DE, I think you will really appreciate what NH has to offer...
 
Old 12-16-2011, 05:15 PM
 
87 posts, read 125,253 times
Reputation: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Verseau View Post
Oh, trust me. I'm far from rich! I just think you have to realize that most people in NH don't have the same expectations for big new construction. We're just used to living in older, smaller houses.

To be fair, homes are definitely cheaper the farther you get from the MA border, in general... southern NH is a very desirable place to live both for the access to natural amenities and the access to jobs and cultural amenities near Boston.

The Boston metro area which includes parts of southern NH has the second lowest unemployment rate among the 15 largest metros (after DC), and a lot of people come to look for work near Boston. Many of those jobs are in high-paying industries like biomed and high-tech. The problem is, it's also the oldest major city in the country... the housing stock in this part of New England is very old and there aren't a whole lot of opportunities for new development compared to most other parts of the US. This makes those high-end homes you described very expensive, because they make up an extremely small percentage of the market.

Plus... if you're happy with the natural amenities you have in DE, I think you will really appreciate what NH has to offer...
Thanks Verseau as always for your insights. I know you also replied in some of my Dallas threads! As you know, I love the nature in the northeast. Snow outside your window, possible white christmas, lakes, rivers, beaches, kayaking, mountains, and tall tall trees.. the pine forests.. maple leaves etc. In a way I like NH homes too.. Even with vinyl with the absence of brick, they still look great when you see them along with large lots and mature trees and rolling hills.. It is what is inside these homes that bothers me. I guess I have to search really hard to find one that I like. Somehow I like the open floor plan (2 story spacious living room). I would sacrifice the 4th or 5th bedroom for the open floor plan any day.

But from a price point Plano/ DFW area wins hands down. I am looking at 10-year cost of ownership and overall living expenses. I am comparing them to DE. (Major cost drivers are DE private schools vs TX / NH public schools, mortgage, insurance, and taxes etc.) Ideally NH should be little cheaper than DE, BUT the high mortgage payments (for what I would like) makes it almost even. That is where TX comes ahead overall even with their sales tax. This is assuming I am putting kids in public schools whether it is NH or TX. Of course I am looking only at a specific area in both states. (Boston metro vs Dallas metro.)

I guess the older homes, lack of land, and Boston high tech job market is driving the costs high!

Is there any area in southern NH that you would recommend? (I was too immersed in researching Dallas last few days, now that I have a clear picture of that area, I am moving my focus to NH. of course I plan to visit both places before making up mind) If I can find the home I like for the price of 400-500k then I think I will tend to lean towards to NH. I think both are great states, each with its unique advantages! Oh.. one more thing. I am not necessarily looking for new construction. In fact I do NOT prefer "brand new" construction. I am ok with homes built after 1995 thro' 2010

I need a magnifying glass and a magic carpet to flyover southern NH!!!
 
Old 12-16-2011, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
3,826 posts, read 5,535,726 times
Reputation: 2874
See, the open floor plan works well in the South, but in New England you are better off with lower ceilings and rooms that you can close off when you aren't using them - seperate heating zones.
 
Old 12-16-2011, 05:45 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
2,241 posts, read 4,029,862 times
Reputation: 3763
Did you ever mention what town you will be working in in MA? Also, how long of a commute are you willing to have?

If it's really important for you to be close to the MA border, then I might suggest looking at towns like Milford and Merrimack to start... the median property values here are lower than many other towns in the area. I believe the schools are strong as well (Merrimack might have better schools, but Milford is a bit closer to outdoor activities). Goffstown is a little bit farther from the border but might suit your needs too. Although this part of the state isn't really my area of expertise, so I will let the others chime in!

And in case you haven't been using it already: http://www.nneren.com/
 
Old 12-16-2011, 06:25 PM
 
Location: The Woods
14,237 posts, read 12,582,051 times
Reputation: 5773
I've helped build houses of that sort OP. Most are garbage with a gaudy veneer to fool the gullible buyers who want to feel like they're in a mansion. In a decade you'll have a place that's crumbling, cracking, leaking, etc. It might not last as long as the mortgage.

Besides that, wait till you see a tax bill on a big house...
 
Old 12-16-2011, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Madison, WI
14,965 posts, read 19,682,705 times
Reputation: 7452
Basically, if you want a nice 3 bedroom 2+ bath house w/ a fireplace and land that will cost at a minimum 275K in many areas of NH. Add on a very good school district and you can add 100K to that price. Even though NH never fully participated in the housing bubble MANY new houses went up in the 2003-2007 time period that were cookie cutter in nature. Also, prices vary substantially depending on the desirability of the town, the tax rate, the tax base, proximity to the interstate highway, etc. For jobs- Rockingham and Hillsborough counties are where you want to be for the most options as well as commuting to more options. For retirement, Carroll county is where you want to be for lower housing prices and tax rates.
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