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Old 07-25-2015, 06:53 AM
 
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Hi,

I am from NYC and am looking at the possibility of moving to NH within the next year.

Can anyone please tell me about the differences, plusses and minuses of the following three cities:

Concord, Nashua, and Manchester.

I visited Concord recently and seemed like a decent town, but may be too small for me coming from NYC.

Are Nashua and Manchester much different? Are the winters brutal? How is crime? General quality of life?

Thanks.
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Old 07-25-2015, 06:57 AM
 
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All three have nice parts and parts not so desirable.

Crime in any city is an issue.

And note. NH came in last for heroin addiction (last means worst).
Serious problem in New Hampshire.
And the state at this time does not seem to have a grip on the issue other then filling up the prisons.
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Old 07-25-2015, 07:40 AM
 
Location: West Madison^WMHT
3,174 posts, read 2,743,911 times
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Thumbs up Compared to NYC, our cities and our heroin problem are tiny

He's coming from NYC. By that standard, NH is a crime-free utopia full of pine trees and little else. Even our "cities" like Concord, Nashua, and Manchester are relatively low-density, low-amenity, and low crime in comparison to even the rest of New York state.

Even the biggest cities in NH feel more like a large town than a "City". Usually seen as a positive aspect of life here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by unit731 View Post
And note. NH came in last for heroin addiction (last means worst). Serious problem in New Hampshire.
Came in last for what? I know New Hampshire ranked 49th out of 50 states in terms of access to treatment for addiction. In terms of actual addiction and OD rates, New Hampshire is right in the middle of the pack. Yes, NH saw about three dozen OD deaths this year, that'd be a slightly more deadly than average weekend in NYC.


Quote:
Originally Posted by chasmain View Post
Are Nashua and Manchester much different? Are the winters brutal? How is crime? General quality of life?
Nashua, Manchester, and Concord all have some similarities, winters can be pretty impressive here, not so much brutal like the Dakotas as just long and wearying.

If you value the things that make New Hampshire unique, quality of life is great, especially once you get into the semi-rural parts of the state. Nothing compares to tapping your own trees for syrup on snowshoes in April!
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Old 07-25-2015, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Manchester NH
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Of the three only Concord is not a former mill town.
The demise of several industries had left both Manchester and Nashua hurting for quite a while of the two I would say Manchester did a better job of recovering.Concord is more the political hub of the state.

All three offer major hospitals all three have an ongoing drug problem but Concord has less in the way of gang related issues.

Socially speaking ( ie night life ) Manchester and Nashua will suit you better , as you ascertained about Concords small town feel it closes down rather early in comparison to the other two.

Whether it be Nashua or Manchester, stay away from tree named streets they seem to draw the type of crown most folks don't want.
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Old 07-25-2015, 12:55 PM
 
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Thanks, all, for the responses. I had heard that Vermont had a heroin issue. I am not sure why it seems to be such a problem in New England.

In any event, I am wondering how much an adjustment it would be to go to NH. It would mean a serious cut in pay, but then again NH does not have sales and income tax (how do things like roads and infrastructure get paid for?). I would also have to get a car. I live in the outer boroughs and commute to Manhattan by subway.

Would it be possible to rent a small apartment for 1K or so in one of the three cities? If I make less, but spend less and have a much less hectic lifestyle surrounded by nature and friendly people (I understand there is good and bad everywhere), then it may be worth the swap.

Is it true there is a homeless issue in Concord? I didn't notice it when I went last month, but then again, I was only there for two days.

Is it tough in NH for a single guy?

I guess I want to get a sense if people in NH, specifically the three cities mentioned are generally restless, meaning dying to get out. Or, are they relatively content where they are?

Thanks.
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Old 07-25-2015, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Manchester NH
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Apartments can run from 650 a month to far more than they are worth

PT will get you around the city but there is more to see and experience in NH than just the city
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Old 07-25-2015, 02:21 PM
 
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Penacook Textile Mill and leather tannery in North Concord.
Rumford Press mill in Concord center.
Plus others.
Concord was the printing capital on New England at a time in the past. Still some printing now.
Rumford Press printed Readesr Digest amongst many other magazines plus other types of printing.

The population of Concord is around 35,000 which is small coming from NYC. But it is the capital.

I jokingly asked at a gas station store in Concord one Friday night - to the cashier.
"What do you do for entertainment on a Friday night in Concord?"
The prompt answer was:
"Either rent movies or watch the river rise". Yes, a few years ago when folks rented videos.

Hope this helps.
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Old 07-25-2015, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Manchester NH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unit731 View Post
Penacook Textile Mill and leather tannery in North Concord.
Rumford Press mill in Concord center.
Plus others.
Concord was the printing capital on New England at a time in the past. Still some printing now.
Rumford Press printed Readesr Digest amongst many other magazines plus other types of printing.

The population of Concord is around 35,000 which is small coming from NYC. But it is the capital.

I jokingly asked at a gas station store in Concord one Friday night - to the cashier.
"What do you do for entertainment on a Friday night in Concord?"
The prompt answer was:
"Either rent movies or watch the river rise". Yes, a few years ago when folks rented videos.

Hope this helps.



Concord had mills but Concord was not a mill town like Manchester or Nashua .. Evidence of this truth can be found just by driving through each city.. And while Concord was the printing capital of NE, Manchester was the textile capital of the world..and as an aside I worked at Waumbec in the 70's

Millyard Museum | Manchester Historic Association

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Old 07-25-2015, 05:09 PM
 
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I moved to New Hampshire from NYC not quite ten years ago. I lived in Merrimack for 9 years and now I live in Nashua, but not in town, I am right on the border of Hollis, which is more rural. Some of the differences that come to mind:

*I definitely do much more outdoorsy stuff now.
*A lot of things are "easier", not such a hassle, like going to a grocery store, for instance
*I miss all the restaurants of NYC, especially the ethnic places
*I miss being able to go out to eat or for drinks and being able to walk or take a cab home
*It is quieter and I am much more relaxed here
*I rarely hear a car alarm
*I rarely hear loud, booming music
*I enjoy a more rural lifestyle. In my case, I am able to own a horse
*I expected people to be provincial, but they actually are not at all. I found people much more provincial in Queens, NYC when I moved there from Manhattan
*The kids and teens here are actually respectful (in NYC I would cross the street to avoid teenagers, at least in Queens)

The big thing is, you should have a job lined up before you move. I was lucky, I got a job that relocated me. I also got a raise with the job too, so that worked out pretty well for me. I think you can probably find an apartment for $1,000. I was just talking to my boss who owns two beautiful condos in Merrimack that he rents out for about $1,200 each. The place also has a pool and tennis. So, I imagine you could easily find something more modest for a bit less, assuming that your credit is good and that you have good references. But you'll need a car, so don't expect that your expenses will be small. They may even out in a lot of respects. Although the no income tax thing is great.

I think the biggest thing to consider, other than having that job lined up, is why do you want to move here? Are you ready for a big lifestyle change? For me, I had lived in NYC for about 20 years. I loved, loved, loved it for many years. I had a great lifestyle and got what I wanted out of it. After 9/11 I moved to Queens, which I ended up hating. Most of my friends by then had also started having children, so my social life changed quite a bit too. I found that I was just tired of the noise and dirt, inconsiderate neighbors, not being able to have a car, just what a hassle some of the most simple things could be. Such as, being so far away from any outdoor activity because it was a major effort to get out of the city -- a major undertaking to plan a simple hike or ski trip or something. Basically, I was done with it all and ready for my next life. I also grew up riding horses, family had a Summer house in the country and so I knew that I enjoyed that lifestyle already (not that I live so rural now, I live in a townhouse!) Basically, the bottomline was that I was ready for a completely different life. I would never have moved to New Hampshire expecting an NYC-lite experience.

So, spend a lot of time thinking about your current lifestyle. Are you ready for that to change? What is your employment experience and job skills?
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Old 07-25-2015, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Manchester NH
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Ok something you definitely need to consider about Concord.. I was looking to get a pizza delivered.. it was 9:30.. not a single pizza place that would deliver was open after 10 and had already stopped taking delivery orders...just saying
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