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Old 09-01-2015, 11:52 AM
miu
 
Location: MA/NH
16,626 posts, read 33,694,669 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northeastah View Post
In this regard, I really wish NH had more infrastructure like access to sewers and drinking water.
Ummm... never going to happen. Low population density, large tracts of beautiful undeveloped land... and who is going to pay for installing and maintaining those sewer and water lines? You? Our property taxes are high enough. Buying Poland Springs water is the cheapest solution. Or get used to the metallic taste of your drinking water. It's all a matter of what one is used to. If you already drink beer or other liquor, those beverages have even stronger flavours that most people disliked at first. But apparently the accompanying high is worth it. Shrug.
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Old 09-01-2015, 02:03 PM
 
Location: West Madison^WMHT
3,199 posts, read 2,825,398 times
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Default What I really miss after moving here is natural gas lines.

If you're really concerned about clean drinking water, several companies now sell small countertop distillers, guaranteed to produce utterly tasteless drinking water.

Any electric distiller will use about 3.2 kilowatts per gallon.
Quote:
Originally Posted by miu View Post
At least our house well water is not rich in iron. One of our immediate neighbors has rusty water in their house.
At all but the highest levels, iron in drinking water is the least of your contaminant worries, it's usually just cosmetic, not toxic. I lived with high-iron water for years, I just stopped buying white towels and switched from boxers to briefs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Northeastah View Post
In this regard, I really wish NH had more infrastructure like access to sewers and drinking water.
This is controlled at the town level, you are welcome to campaign to vote in sewers and water plants for your town budget.

Along with the previously mentioned issues of cost and population density, there's too many parts of the state with ledge close to the surface for the type of massive excavation necessary for sewers and drinking water to be feasible. It's not like you can put them both in the same trench dug into impermeable granite.
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Old 09-01-2015, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Barrington, NH!
1,211 posts, read 1,832,410 times
Reputation: 1769
I like my well water. Great tasting water and best of all, no chlorine taste/smell.

Your first step is to get a water test done so you know what you're dealing with and at what levels. Then you can figure out what type of treatment you need, if any....
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Old 09-01-2015, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Barrington, NH!
1,211 posts, read 1,832,410 times
Reputation: 1769
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northeastah View Post
Sorry to hijack but I have a question that is sort of related to this topic...

if the water from your well has a metallic taste, will the reverse osmosis or any other kind of filter help with that? I've heard from a few ppl I know in NH and MA that have wells that their water has a strong metallic taste.
Sorry, my post above was meant to deal with the thread hijacker's post, not the OP.

I know nothing about arsenic....
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Old 09-02-2015, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
4,542 posts, read 11,829,829 times
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I don't know if I'd make a claim that 80% of wells in Hollis (and similar areas) have elevated arsenic, but it is true that from the 20s to the 60s, the use of arsenical pesticides on orchard crops was common, and this may be part of the cause. Being a naturally occurring substance, arsenic is part of the earth's crust, and is present virtually everywhere, similar to radon, with higher concentrations in certain areas. I always recommend that my Buyers do a comprehensive well-water test, including radon & arsenic, and in certain areas, also test for MTBE, and repeat the testing yearly, along with testing for radon in air. Many substances are odorless, colorless and tasteless, making testing a necessity. As an agent, I wouldn't take it upon myself to recommend a point-of-use RO system over a whole house system, but would direct them to a professional for their recommendations. I would recommend that you do the same.

Quote:
Originally Posted by heyhowyadoin View Post
So, the house we are interested in came back with elevated arsenic level, .25 was the level and .10 is acceptable i believe. The agent is saying that 80% of wells in Hollis and similar areas have this because of the abundance of apple orchards. Anyone deal with this or know this to be true? Big deal? I hear reverse osmosis system is the best remedy. Thanks
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Old Yesterday, 08:42 PM
 
Location: IN
20,310 posts, read 34,804,221 times
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I've been looking at some parcels of land online recently (without buildings), and I've noticed that many have not had water tests done. What are the costs of doing a water test, soil test, and percolation test? Also, the costs of drilling a well, installing a septic system, and running electric certainly add up even more than most people realize. That brings me to another question. If you have a parcel on a road that doesn't have an electric power pole nearby, would the cost be even greater overall?

I am certain this is why many people prefer to buy already existing properties!
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Old Today, 12:16 AM
 
4,140 posts, read 4,431,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I've been looking at some parcels of land online recently (without buildings), and I've noticed that many have not had water tests done. What are the costs of doing a water test, soil test, and percolation test? Also, the costs of drilling a well, installing a septic system, and running electric certainly add up even more than most people realize. That brings me to another question. If you have a parcel on a road that doesn't have an electric power pole nearby, would the cost be even greater overall?

I am certain this is why many people prefer to buy already existing properties!
And here's the real kicker: until the builder digs out the foundation they don't know how much ledge they will find on the lot. Cost me 4 grand to blast a small amount of ledge away on a home I built. I got off easy.

The builder told me he often has to blast as much as 20 grand of ledge away. Ledge is common in the Lakes Region. Knew a guy in Gilford who paid 90k for a building lot & had to blast 45k of ledge out of the ground that he did not budget for.
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Old Today, 11:04 AM
KCZ
 
1,601 posts, read 814,953 times
Reputation: 4447
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I've been looking at some parcels of land online recently (without buildings), and I've noticed that many have not had water tests done. What are the costs of doing a water test, soil test, and percolation test? Also, the costs of drilling a well, installing a septic system, and running electric certainly add up even more than most people realize. That brings me to another question. If you have a parcel on a road that doesn't have an electric power pole nearby, would the cost be even greater overall?

I am certain this is why many people prefer to buy already existing properties!



The cost of a water test depends on what you test for. Typical components include categories like Coliform/E coli bacteria, minerals like iron and copper, health hazards like arsenic and lead, radon, radioactive components like uranium, water hardness, etc. I recently used this company to do a fairly comprehensive test on my well water, and it cost $200. Their site also has links to info on the NH state website.

https://www.endynelabs.com/analytica...water-testing/
https://www.endynelabs.com/analytica...rinking-water/



Likewise, the cost of well drilling is very dependent on your location. There is a set-up fee, and then cost is based on the number of feet of casing and feet of drilling required. I recently had a well drilled (on a different property) for $8000. That included just the drilling procedure. Well site work prior to the drilling and trenching for the water and power lines to the house was another $3000. Installation of the pump and hooking everything up will be another charge when it's completed.
The NH state website has a large, but incomplete, database of drilled wells throughout the state. You can do a search to get information on a property for sale, or look at wells in your area to see the depth they've been drilled (which is not infallible in guesstimating how deep your well might have to be).
https://www4.des.state.nh.us/DESOnes...sicSearch.aspx
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Old Today, 11:39 AM
 
Location: West Madison^WMHT
3,199 posts, read 2,825,398 times
Reputation: 3885
Thumbs up Yep, "this is why many people prefer to buy already existing properties"

Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I've been looking at some parcels of land online recently (without buildings), and I've noticed that many have not had water tests done. What are the costs of doing a water test, soil test, and percolation test?
If current owners had a high confidence the site could pass all these tests with flying colors, they'd be crowing about the results (and asking a much higher price for the parcel).

Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
That brings me to another question. If you have a parcel on a road that doesn't have an electric power pole nearby, would the cost be even greater overall?
Depending on your town and local providers, for a site that isn't anywhere near a utility pole with capacity, you may not be able to get lines brought in for electric and Internet (cable/phone) for anything near a reasonable install cost, or at all.
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Old Today, 06:01 PM
 
Location: IN
20,310 posts, read 34,804,221 times
Reputation: 12674
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave Stranger View Post
And here's the real kicker: until the builder digs out the foundation they don't know how much ledge they will find on the lot. Cost me 4 grand to blast a small amount of ledge away on a home I built. I got off easy.

The builder told me he often has to blast as much as 20 grand of ledge away. Ledge is common in the Lakes Region. Knew a guy in Gilford who paid 90k for a building lot & had to blast 45k of ledge out of the ground that he did not budget for.
Good points, something I will look into further in my research. The area I'm looking at is mostly in Moultonboro, and they have a very detailed interactive GIS parcel map with soil types, flood zone areas, and other good data.
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