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Old 02-18-2008, 09:40 PM
 
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Cool One of the more affordable New England states???

Is New Hampshire one of the more affordable eastern states?
My boyfriend and I are wanting to move somewhere in New England, or somewhere on the East coast but everywhere in New England seems extremely expensive.
Is NH too expensive for a young couple (18, 19) to settle?
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Old 02-19-2008, 04:55 AM
 
Location: Tolland County- Northeastern CT
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New England tends to be higher then many others areas of the nation cost of living wise- but outside of greater Boston and Fairfield county Connecticut- prices are not bad considering the high quality of life the region has.

New Hampshire has the lowest tax burden in the 6 state region-although high real estate taxes can bite.
Generally, energy costs are a higher here, some food costs higher- and real estate is some areas can be costly.
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Old 02-20-2008, 10:00 AM
 
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Depends on what you do for a living, whether you need a car, etc.
But yes, New England is generally more expensive. If you are interested in East Coast in general, you can do pretty well in Pennsylvania or the Carolinas (unless they're "the South.") Of course, it matters where in a state you go, urban, rural, suburban. Usually there's no free lunch- if there's work, there's expense. Cheaper areas rarely have good public transport, so car expense has to be figured in.
For cities, Philadelphia can be pretty cheap, and you can avoid the really bad neighborhoods.
I think New England is a very tough place to start out and try to get somewhere. I came here when I was 20 and really thrashed around, and have had to really hustle in my older years to get anything going. And remember, a whole lot of what you might want in a place is gonna cost- rural trips or city pleasures, arts/culture. On the other hand, the cities have the opportunities- some kind of jobs, schools. They're all a hustle, though. If I couldn't knock myself to make things work here (as it appeared in the 1980s) I was thinking of moving to Minneapolis or Albuquerque. Good luck. It's always great to move somewhere on purpose and see what it is and what it isn't.
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Old 02-24-2008, 05:45 AM
 
Location: Sunny Naples Florida :)
1,462 posts, read 138,091 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skytrekker View Post
New England tends to be higher then many others areas of the nation cost of living wise-
New Hampshire has the lowest tax burden in the 6 state region-although high real estate taxes can bite.
Generally, energy costs are a higher here, some food costs higher- and real estate is some areas can be costly.
True true and true, you want cheaper living try farther south. Depending on where you are in NH there is pretty much little opportunity for work (of course I don't know what you do for a living) but the small towns are going to have littl work and the bigger ones will have limited work. Expenses are through the roof, yeah there's no sales tax but there's a food and beverage tax
(8%), home taxes are outragous, view tax, god aweful expensive to register cars my insurance was higher here.
The carolinas are much cheaper living and you'll still get season change they have great history, and housing similar to NE.
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Old 02-24-2008, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Tolland County- Northeastern CT
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Originally Posted by Tarastomsgirl View Post
True true and true, you want cheaper living try farther south. Depending on where you are in NH there is pretty much little opportunity for work (of course I don't know what you do for a living) but the small towns are going to have littl work and the bigger ones will have limited work. Expenses are through the roof, yeah there's no sales tax but there's a food and beverage tax
(8%), home taxes are outragous, view tax, god aweful expensive to register cars my insurance was higher here.
The carolinas are much cheaper living and you'll still get season change they have great history, and housing similar to NE.
An article from the Hartford Courant however said this yesterday about the economy in Connecticut

From the Hartford Courant February 23, 2008 on the Connecticut Economy

Not your Uncle's Recession In Connecticut -- Courant.com

According to Forbes Magazine Charlotte NC was called one of the nations most highly stressed cities. Bad planning, bad traffic, high crime, pollution and a low quality of life.

Last edited by skytrekker; 02-26-2008 at 04:37 AM..
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Old 02-24-2008, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Sunny Naples Florida :)
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Originally Posted by skytrekker View Post


As far as the Carolina's being cheaper- Real estate is somewhat less in most areas- but incomes are lower in NC- prices for a single family home in Raleigh and Cary for example are a mere 10% lower now then central Connecticut. Incomes however are higher here- so the real estate market there is perhaps more stressed now. Also more things are taxed-like groceries. In addition at least from the CT forum- I have heard mostly con as opposed to pro comparing the Carolina's and New England, from those who have lived there, living there now and others who have visited and not been impressed. Look before you leap.

According to Forbes Magazine Charlotte NC was called one of the nations most highly stressed cities. Bad planning, bad traffic, high crime, pollution and a low quality of life.
I find it more expensive to shop up here without the "taxes" then with.. You might have have no tax but the food price is just jacked up to include the tax in the price. I believe tax is 8% up here for food and beverage I dunno about the Carolinas but in Fla its 6%. Tenesse I think is higher with 9% tax so NH isn't all that cheap. You have one less tax and thats sales tax but like I said its just added into the price so really you're not getting much of a break, plus you have all the more expensive taxes like the view tax, home taxes, school "tuition" taxes etc.

Pay in NH isn't that great its about equal to down south but more costly to live here. The average job here is paying about $7.50-$8.25 ish range. Thats the same as other places but you'll have to factor in higher heating and electrical costs, higher insurance costs (thats a personal per person situation of course) etc. Jobs are hard to find up here we have been averaging about 12-19 in the paper, usually about 5 or 6 of those adds are from Temp agencies. For a town of 22,000 or more 12 jobs isn't that great a pickin. Its all about where you choose to live really and what line of work you're in.

My husband could not find a police position willing to pay him what he was making as a 911 dispatcher. We heard everyone rave about pay in NE and how much more it pays and we had no choice but to take a pay cut. One officer here bragged he cracked $70,000 this year and he's been an officer for 9 years. My husband cracked that after 3 years as a dispatcher and I'm ashamed to say what he made this year taking that cut.. That was our fault of course, lesson learned. The whole country is bad off right now so no place is gonna have the greener grass unfortunatly, you just gotta make the best of whats going on and try to get by till it gets better..
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Old 02-24-2008, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Tolland County- Northeastern CT
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I think the facts speak for themselves.
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Old 02-24-2008, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Madbury, New Hampshire
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarastomsgirl View Post
food and beverage tax
(8%), home taxes are outragous, view tax, god aweful expensive to register cars my insurance was higher here.
There is a meal tax on prepared foods only. No tax on regular supermarket stuff. Beer, wine, liquor, tobacco, etc are taxed like everywhere.

There is no view tax. Property tax is based on market value. If you have a nice view then your house is probably worth more. Just like any other state.

I'm amazed your car insurance was higher. Mine halved from Los Angeles. Does Fla cap liability cost?

I drove through Keene for the first time the other day on my way back from West Virginia. Nice town you have there. Main Street reminds me of Bedford Falls! We had lunch in Timoleon's - a true classic American diner.

Last edited by rmcewan; 02-24-2008 at 05:58 PM..
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Old 02-25-2008, 04:53 AM
 
Location: Sunny Naples Florida :)
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Originally Posted by rmcewan View Post

There is no view tax. Property tax is based on market value. If you have a nice view then your house is probably worth more. Just like any other state.



.

NH View Tax


NH starts "view tax"

Wikipedia NH view tax
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Old 02-25-2008, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Monadnock region
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Sorry, there really isn't a 'view' tax - it just seems that way. And btw, since absolutely anyone can write something up for wiki - it's not a valid reference for much of anything.

Yes, if you have a really nice view, your taxes can/will go up. Yes, people call it a 'view tax'. Just like I call our state vehicle emissions test (where we have to pay to show that our vehicle is new and they don't even bother to test anything, just take our money and tell us that it's 'not applicable'. now that's a racket!) is a tax.

there's a nice explanation in the New London's assessor's page, about 4th paragraph down Town of New London, NH -- ASSESSING DEPARTMENT that says they've been doing it since at least 1987.

As rmcewan says, there really is no 'tax', it's really just part of 'location, location, location'. if you are located in a great spot (because of view, or proximity to schools or what have you), your assessment goes up. sometimes 17%. yeah, it feels like a tax, and NH folks will 'call' it a tax - it isn't truly a tax. It may seem like a fine hair to split, but it is.
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