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Old 06-02-2017, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Manchester NH
2,317 posts, read 2,629,773 times
Reputation: 3230

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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
I didn't realize things had changed so much. When I was in college my dad made me work for low pay in a factory "so you'll know what it's like and you'll appreciate it when you get a good job."

A NON air conditioned factory! Where the machines caught fire on a regular basis! grrrrrrr.

His dad had done the same thing to him--so he would get his education and never work in a factory.

But also, it wasn't as hard to get into college as it is today. You could always get into a state college. I would have LOVED to work at any sort of job at a BEACH! They provided you with a place to stay, you got room mates but you were only a kid so you put up with it.

I can't believe that EVERY kid has got a high paying Boston job or a great internship and there are NO kids who want to work? Aren't there any people anywhere who would want a summer job at the beach? Aren't there kids who aren't going to college who would take a job? Unemployed people who would take a temporary job? I had no idea they were importing visa workers to do these summer beach jobs around here.

Oh you poor thing (kidding) I used to work at Waumbec mills in the 70's and then Malden Mill in the early 80's.. ever been in a Dye house where the humidity is around 100 % and add the summer heat to it..fun times..so is foundry work! Oh and factory work is not an evil thing.. it built much of New England
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Old 06-02-2017, 03:46 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
18,067 posts, read 17,198,889 times
Reputation: 30248
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyDave View Post
Oh you poor thing (kidding) I used to work at Waumbec mills in the 70's and then Malden Mill in the early 80's.. ever been in a Dye house where the humidity is around 100 % and add the summer heat to it..fun times..so is foundry work! Oh and factory work is not an evil thing.. it built much of New England
We can commiserate. I didn't hate it because I didn't know any better. It was my very first job--and I am "only a girl." We made greeting cards--standing at a conveyer belt all day and you were not allowed to sit down, not allowed to go to the bathroom, etc. The cards went through an oven at one end where the hot glue and glitter were put on and often came out on fire--that was so exciting. We didn't get to take a break while they put the fire out though--we had to grab a broom and "look busy."

Got there early to climb up on top of stacks of boxes to get up to the top to retrieve my supply of empty boxes for the day. Boxes to pack the greeting cards in after you had counted them.

I liked the people though--and the work environment was so rotten and authoritarian that the workers came together and helped each other. If I ran out of boxes and had to go climbing, the woman on the other side of the belt with catch my cards for me--otherwise they would have gone all over the floor! At the end of the day, we disassembled the machine, lugged it to a huge wash basin, and scrubbed it.

I also worked at Pratt & Whitney sweat shops in CT during college. Also, as a camp counselor. As an intern during the school year in college. All of those jobs were learning experiences--different kinds of people, different sorts of jobs, different perceptions of what it meant to work. I think maybe kids are missing something today--a few months of menial work would help them to understand. My dad was a school counselor and that's what he taught ME. He also taught me to never look down on someone because of what they did for a living.

BTW, my gt grandfather back in England worked in a foundry and HIS father worked as a dyer. Guess that's why it was handed down in my family to DO it and see what it's like! And it was a good lesson. I didn't hate it but I sure knew I didn't want to do that for the rest of my life! And I learned to appreciate where things came from.
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Old 06-02-2017, 04:12 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
454 posts, read 294,791 times
Reputation: 578
Also kids these days have access to the federal credit card (student loans). Why work at all as long as you are enrolled in college? Get living paid for too. A four-year summer camp.
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Old 06-03-2017, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,760 posts, read 21,813,668 times
Reputation: 27832
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeviDunn View Post
Also kids these days have access to the federal credit card (student loans). Why work at all as long as you are enrolled in college? Get living paid for too. A four-year summer camp.
Only if you don't want to have anything other than cafeteria food, whatever clothing is on sale at Walmart, and waving at your friends as they leave for an evening out.
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Old 06-03-2017, 01:20 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
454 posts, read 294,791 times
Reputation: 578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
Only if you don't want to have anything other than cafeteria food, whatever clothing is on sale at Walmart, and waving at your friends as they leave for an evening out.
Have you been to college in the last ten years? You get much more in loans than tuition and books cost. Plus, on top of it, many kids have parents that help them out too. I worked all through school but many of the kids straight lived it up and had fun. Or how about this: don't work and just live off mega student loans AND food stamps and other aid. Lots of kids do it. Years ago I read news articles about college students using food stamps to buy organic food, lobster, steak, etc. (In reaction to bad publicity, I think some states started to limit what you can buy with food stamps.)
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Old 06-04-2017, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,505 posts, read 49,604,613 times
Reputation: 24548
I think Steveusaf got it right. I see it as a lack of workers due to there just being fewer kids as well as greater opportunities for those kids that pay more and are far more interesting than bussing tables or cleaning toilets at a hotel. Basically demand is exceeding supply but the employers are not willing to raise the prices they want to pay. Economics in action.


When we visited Yellowstone National Park a couple of years ago almost all of the staff came from some place I never heard of in Eastern Europe. The people running the Lodge said they simply could not recruit Americans for the jobs. The Park Rangers said much the same.
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Old 06-05-2017, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Boston
5,097 posts, read 1,464,223 times
Reputation: 3735
I live in a beach town, my friends who own restaurants have been waiting for foreign help to arrive to serve as waitresses/kitchen help. According to them, you can bring in Europeans for a four month period but they can only work 3 of those months.
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Old 06-05-2017, 09:45 AM
 
1,338 posts, read 947,230 times
Reputation: 1567
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeviDunn View Post
Have you been to college in the last ten years? You get much more in loans than tuition and books cost. Plus, on top of it, many kids have parents that help them out too. I worked all through school but many of the kids straight lived it up and had fun. Or how about this: don't work and just live off mega student loans AND food stamps and other aid. Lots of kids do it. Years ago I read news articles about college students using food stamps to buy organic food, lobster, steak, etc. (In reaction to bad publicity, I think some states started to limit what you can buy with food stamps.)
Ah, the ol' "I worked my way through College" I've had to hear over and over.

In 1976 my father's state tuition was <$900 a semester, he bought a 4 year old Buick Grandsport for $800 and insured it for $160, gas cost $.60/gallon, all the while pulling $7.50/hr ($10.75 Sundays) at Stop & Shop as a stock boy.

In 2003 my state tuition was $6k a semester, I bought a 13 year old Miata for $4k and insured it for $2,300 (with zero infractions), gas cost $3.20/gallon, all the while pulling $8/hr (12/hr Sundays) at Stop & Shop as a front end 'manager' and $12/hr at my CO-OP.

Let me guess - you also had bank CDs earning 10%+ too? Before you slag the kids too hard, do realize they're living a reality different from yours. Few are asking for posh dorm rooms and glistening gyms - they're just looking for an edge in this high competitive market.
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Old 06-05-2017, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Nashua area, NH
278 posts, read 521,708 times
Reputation: 393
Mar-a-Lago still seems to be able to fill 60+ seasonal foreign workers for the 2017 season...
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Old 06-05-2017, 10:10 AM
 
Location: New Hampshire
454 posts, read 294,791 times
Reputation: 578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrewsburried View Post
Ah, the ol' "I worked my way through College" I've had to hear over and over.

In 1976 my father's state tuition was <$900 a semester, he bought a 4 year old Buick Grandsport for $800 and insured it for $160, gas cost $.60/gallon, all the while pulling $7.50/hr ($10.75 Sundays) at Stop & Shop as a stock boy.

In 2003 my state tuition was $6k a semester, I bought a 13 year old Miata for $4k and insured it for $2,300 (with zero infractions), gas cost $3.20/gallon, all the while pulling $8/hr (12/hr Sundays) at Stop & Shop as a front end 'manager' and $12/hr at my CO-OP.

Let me guess - you also had bank CDs earning 10%+ too? Before you slag the kids too hard, do realize they're living a reality different from yours. Few are asking for posh dorm rooms and glistening gyms - they're just looking for an edge in this high competitive market.

Awful guess. I just graduated in 2011. I'm living this life with them. I'm talking about MY generation and the kids slightly younger than me.
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