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Old 06-09-2017, 04:19 PM
 
1,284 posts, read 829,536 times
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I think his 40 years of experience was hiking the brutal sidewalks of his home state:

"Disgraceful Trails - NH Union Leader"

Hilarious.
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Old 06-09-2017, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Manchester NH
2,317 posts, read 2,629,038 times
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surprised she didn't demand juice bars along the trails too
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Old 06-09-2017, 09:15 PM
KCZ
 
1,557 posts, read 769,979 times
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None of the comments there showed much sympathy either.
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Old 06-10-2017, 07:12 AM
 
422 posts, read 175,798 times
Reputation: 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by DebNashua View Post
I think his 40 years of experience was hiking the brutal sidewalks of his home state:

"Disgraceful Trails - NH Union Leader"

Hilarious.
Was this worth a thread,the women obviously know nothing but walking around a track.
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Old 06-10-2017, 08:46 AM
 
Location: West Madison^WMHT
3,174 posts, read 2,752,123 times
Reputation: 3822
Unhappy ... boulders should be reduced to proper steps and the last section should have hand holds...

Quote:
Originally Posted by UL
All hiking trails anywhere have potential hazards for the unprepared. But the Mount Jackson trail raises those hazards to unacceptable levels. The boulders should be reduced to proper steps and the last section should have hand holds for safety.
All that's missing is "For the children!"
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Old 06-10-2017, 10:11 AM
 
1,284 posts, read 829,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Sunday View Post
Was this worth a thread,the women obviously know nothing but walking around a track.
shrug. it was to me. feel free not to comment if it doesn't interest you.
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Old 06-10-2017, 10:13 AM
 
1,284 posts, read 829,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonesuch View Post
All that's missing is "For the children!"
Right! I suppose we should start a state project to haul some cement mixers up the mountains so some proper stairs can be built.
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Old 06-10-2017, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Barrington, NH!
1,209 posts, read 1,813,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Sunday View Post
Was this worth a thread,the women obviously know nothing but walking around a track.
Yes it was worth a thread. Now that it's on citydata, maybe it will get NH DOT's attention so they can go install stairs and pave the trails throughout the Whites so "civilized" folk can traverse the mountains
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Old 06-10-2017, 10:37 AM
 
879 posts, read 246,584 times
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What a numbskull; I've hiked many mountains, including NH; the expectation is that you negotiate whatever natural obstacles hinder your route. Now if she was going to refer to the poor markings of various trails throughout the White Mountains, I'd say she would have a point.
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Old 06-10-2017, 10:59 AM
 
333 posts, read 227,294 times
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The letter writer has a point if you think about it from a different angle. Trails are meant to facilitate passage through a rough area. Trees are cut down and sometimes rocks are moved and steps are created with either stone or wood. The Mt. Willey trail is an example of this.

Unfortunately, after hoards of people have been walking on a trail for 50 to 100 years, the soil erodes away entirely, leaving only rocks on a trail that may have started out flat. In places the current trail may be as much as 3 feet below the surface of the ground on each side! These rocks are not flat and laid horizontally, but often pointy and sticking up straight. This is probably what the letter writer found difficult.

Such a trail is indeed treacherous, especially for older hikers. The rocks aren't the only problem. A trail worn well below ground level becomes a stream during rainstorms and in the spring, and a sheet of ice in the winter.

The folks who made these trails would certainly be very surprised to see what condition they're in today. I can tell you for certain that today's White Mountain trails are far more difficult to walk on than they were 40 years ago. Just imagine the millions of people who have walked on them in all those years.

Both the Mt. Willey trail and the Kearsarge trail on the Rollins State Park side (to give but two examples) used to be very easy trails with excellent footing that any hiker could handle, even in sneakers. Both trails now have very poor footing with large rocks sticking up everywhere. In another 100 years many of these trails will be unusable as they continue to erode several feet below ground. Injuries will increase, which will have a cost to rescuers.

In many cases the footing is much better through the woods, off the trail. But another purpose of trails (so the wisdom goes) is to keep everyone on the same trail to limit erosion to one place. The downside to that philosophy is trails that eventually resemble canyons.

Everything in nature deteriorates, especially with heavy human use. Things that deteriorate beyond usability need to be abandoned or repaired. So in fact the letter writer has a point: the trails are deteriorating, but the solution, if any, isn't clear. Reroute the trails? Renovate them? There is over 1200 miles of trails in the White Mountain National Forest, many of them maintained by volunteers. I doubt that there is enough money or manpower to keep up with the needed maintenance.

Along with deteriorating trails, the hiking experience in the WMNF today is marred by a massive increase in the number of hikers clogging the trails and parking lots. Hiking is no longer a solitary walk through quiet woods. It has turned into a huge forced social event that isn't pleasurable to people who want to be alone in the woods. There's nothing less fun than winter hiking on a trail that consists of thousands of frozen holes from other people's footsteps.

These are the realities of changing social and environmental conditions. The letter writer wants to return to the conditions of 40 years ago, when you could backpack for a week on good trails without encountering another human being. Maybe that's possible, but only in remote areas, during the off season, midweek. On the bright side, global warming will eventually create increased hiking opportunities farther and farther north, toward Hudson's Bay. It's just a question of staying a few steps ahead of the crowd moving up from the south.
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