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Old 10-10-2018, 03:21 PM
 
637 posts, read 968,628 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeavingNewEngland View Post
The problem is is that you have trouble seeing the alternative media side of things. I am alternative media. This reality does exist, just because most don't see it does not at all mean its not there. Many are lucky enough to never see what I describe and rarely leave their NH bubble. I been more places than most of these people.

No, that's not true. And 50% of the state population were born elsewhere, so a lot of people have seen at least something outside of NH. I am aware that some people have real hardships, but you are describing what a distinct minority in NH would experience. I could say the same for you that you said for me - you are "warning" people as if your experience here is the norm.
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Old 10-10-2018, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Newburyport, MA
749 posts, read 317,714 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AirDroz View Post
Yeah. I noticed the prices of homes in Portsmouth are very very high. However, I have found apartments on craigslist renting for 750-1000 month which is very reasonable. I would just have to hold off on buying a home for a few years. Portsmouth would be my ideal as of now, but unfortunately I have not heard back about the job since applying 3 weeks ago.

Would concord be "worse"? I see that Portsmouth is a seaport which is very appealing to me.
I am not familiar enough with Concord to comment too much - Portsmouth is the "it" town in NH these days, which is why it's so darned expensive. It does have a nice harbor, lots of trendy restaurants and bars (and not just the dive bars with people crying in their beer), and the beach is closeby... plus if you want to go up to Maine or down to Boston, you're well positioned, so it's not just hype alone, but I still do think it's overpriced due to the hype...

I certainly don't have a negative impression of Concord. It's a lot more reasonably priced, and it's also closer to the state's White Mountains and lakes regions, which are really nice in their own right - not too different from the Adirondacks if you go there much. There's no right or wrong answer here, just depends on what your budget and desired activities are (plus where you can get a job, of course!).

I lived 5 years in Rochester-NY, and if you're currently there, or Buffalo, Syracuse or Watertown, you'll be fine in NH climate-wise - it might be a little colder as you go up NH, but you'll get less snow than those mighty "lake effect" blizzards we got back in the Rochester area.

And I wouldn't dismiss Dover. My town is also an upscale harbor town, in many ways like Portsmouth, it's just over the border in MA, and I wouldn't be upset to be living in Dover - get more house for your money there. Check out Wentworth-Douglass Hospital in Dover for openings if you're looking for hospital work.

Last edited by OutdoorLover; 10-10-2018 at 05:51 PM..
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Old 10-10-2018, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Newburyport, MA
749 posts, read 317,714 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KCZ View Post
Air Droz,


I would seriously encourage you to spend some time in NH before committing to a move here. Each region is very different, from housing to attitudes to amenities to climate. You indicated that you were looking for a "clean city" but some of the places being discussed here like Lebanon, Hanover, Laconia, and Tilton have populations of 3K-15K and may barely qualify as a medium town to you. It is easier to get a gun here, and self-sufficiency is both admired as well as necessary in the more rural areas. Also be aware that LeavingNE has been vigorously trashing the state here this week, so take what one person says with a grain of salt.
I lived in Durham for 4+ years when I went to grad school at UNH, and spent plenty of time looking around the state during those years. I was real happy there - only reason I left was that I got a PhD in chemistry and specialize in computer applications in science, and there just wasn't much work for me up there, at least back when I graduated, otherwise I'd still be living in seacoast NH. I eventually found my way back to the area and settled in Newburyport, which is a fine place, but it also just happens to be very close to NH and ME, not just a coincidence - it's the closest I can be to NH/ME and still commute to Cambridge, MA :-).
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Old 10-10-2018, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Barrington, NH!
1,210 posts, read 1,827,034 times
Reputation: 1769
Quote:
Originally Posted by KCZ View Post
Also be aware that LeavingNE has been vigorously trashing the state here this week, so take what one person says with a grain of salt.
Yes, it appears from his other post here that he made some poor life decisions regarding choosing housemates off of Craigslist in 4 different towns and somehow that is the fault of NH.

OP - Regarding Liberatarianism and NH - just don't expect NH to be "Little House on the Prairie" or "Grizzly Adams" frontiersman type homesteading - that doesn't exist anymore exept maybe in remote parts of Alaska. It is RELATIVELY Libertarian compared to other parts of the country. Just don't expect to move here and do whatever you want with no rules or law.
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Old 10-10-2018, 11:22 PM
 
62 posts, read 19,247 times
Reputation: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by cowbell76 View Post
No, that's not true. And 50% of the state population were born elsewhere, so a lot of people have seen at least something outside of NH. I am aware that some people have real hardships, but you are describing what a distinct minority in NH would experience. I could say the same for you that you said for me - you are "warning" people as if your experience here is the norm.

In a more doomsday scenario for someone more upper class, this would be the norm. Thats where all this comes in. Only difference is you could hold more cards as you have a more stationary home, but you will go through roommates like underwear if thats the case and you will get tired of people coming in and out of your home yet you need them to pay your bills. Just pray your wife don't leave you ya know?



And while people come to NH from the midwest or some other generic place, they usually move once and dont experience hardships because money isn't an issue for most of them. I've been reduced to feeling like an Irish traveler or gypsy because of my socioeconomic class but its gonna end soon and I'm excited. I don't have to pay greedy landlords anymore when my new life in Portland OR area starts. I'd have to depend on them if I stayed here though. I won't get into full details but my stepdad has an opportunity to move back there again so I'm taking it. New England is more foreign to me now than it ever was, I have totally nothing to lose by leaving. I don't connect with many transplants who come to NH even. In fact, its the MA ones I met who are most down to earth but they actually don't all come from MA, some Illinois, or some who come from places where this fake white picket fence type world exists in their minds.. like a vanilla bubble. I never cared for midwestern transplants anywhere I've gone whether it be here or Florida. Usually Californian ones want a new start and come from a defined place with defined problems they want to get away from so ya, I found SoCal transplants more down to earth when I was in Portland area before but something about those midwesterners with money who come to places, they bring a fakeness with them.
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Old 10-11-2018, 11:44 AM
 
637 posts, read 968,628 times
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^ Anything could be "the norm" if "the norm" were totally different than it actually is. Yes.


I am glad that you have the opportunity to live in an in-law apartment with your parents in Oregon. The fact that that safety net exists there and not here doesn't somehow make Oregon a superior state.


You sure do paint things with a broad brush.
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Old 10-11-2018, 12:58 PM
 
62 posts, read 19,247 times
Reputation: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by cowbell76 View Post
^ Anything could be "the norm" if "the norm" were totally different than it actually is. Yes.


I am glad that you have the opportunity to live in an in-law apartment with your parents in Oregon. The fact that that safety net exists there and not here doesn't somehow make Oregon a superior state.


You sure do paint things with a broad brush.

Bottom line though, I WON'T have to deal with the same garbage. Whatever else goes wrong we'll see but I know that won't be a problem and neither will snow. And I'd be around even more things. Car registration also is a one time thing, it lasts 5 years. Your vehicle has to pass smog emissions but the state of NH put me through 700 dollars of repairs before taking a whole year to pass with the inspection sticker.


I'm amazed I even endured this for as long as I did honestly. I was really looking to settle down in Nashua after all my hard work to get there as its not an easy place to find an apartment or housing, same with Manchester or Concord too, and I meet this psycho homeowner who put on a good act at the beginning and becam a b**ch. So passive aggressive types, they're all over here too and increasingly over the years more. More of them must be trading places or something, coming to this coast with all the transplants moving, maybe coming from the midwest too.


I am a New England native, through and through and for those that are like us, we're becoming a dying breed in this region. Think like a George Simolaris type accent. That guy "George of the Center" in Billerica. I met another long time native too in my time and guess what she was doing, living in a tent, often babysitting her familys children. We're talking old traditional NE here just in the lowest irish class.



I was with the really poor people in the scheme of things, i was just comfortable enough to maintain a clean enough place. If you're not a native with many generations and a lot of money, you're a poor native and thats where most of the other populace is better off than you and usually they're in higher amounts than the long time New England elite. Since 1920 my family came to these shores, Ellis Island.. Italian primarily. I am from Medford MA technically but at 2 years old, moved to Billerica. Most of my life was spent in the merrimack valley. So it is sadder than ever that I got woken up to a reality where I can't even live here or I am priced out of many areas. But its more temporary. I can get over it because I am also reminded how when I was 20 years old, I wanted to leave here for the south, somewhere like TN or even Maine as at that time, parts were still cheap in ME, but winters were bad so there was a reason I didn't do that.



I Just was never meant to make it in New England, thats the moral of the story here. Whether I was 20, in my young years with a long time to go or 38 now. Nothings changed, people either make it just enough to stay for good or they don't, and in the boomer generation.. so many got homes at such cheap prices. Take Billerica for instance, many of those people now are sitting on top land as prices are rising high again there. The average home is 459K now. When my biological dad bought there, it was 179K at most maybe a little less even.
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Old 10-11-2018, 01:12 PM
 
637 posts, read 968,628 times
Reputation: 740
^ I just realized we're really hijacking another thread.


I will just say, I do get what you're saying with some of this although some of your points are obscured by other parts of your rant. I'm only a little older than you are. I am frustrated too about being too young to buy real estate when it was less expensive, and not being able to end up with huge amounts of equity and climb the property ladder like people even 10-20 years older than I have been able to do. My household is well into upper-middle class territory, and even so, we'd be scraping by if we wanted to start from scratch and buy a typical suburban house in the same towns in eastern MA in which my relatives live or lived.


But, "it is what it is" and factors like that only go so far towards explaining someone's current situation. And I don't believe in any line of thinking that says "I was never meant to...." this or that. You have agency.
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Old 10-11-2018, 10:45 PM
 
1 posts, read 181 times
Reputation: 13
Hi AirDroz,

I cannot attest for any town in NH other than the one that I live in, Hanover. As someone said earlier, it is rural but the best way to describe it is quaint and quiet only when you find it, but also lively in its own way. In my opinion, the biggest part of Hanover is Dartmouth College. Because of the college, there is less than a 5% unemployment rate in Hanover, and I'm sure there are many opportunities for jobs. With your healthcare profession in mind, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center provides arguably one of the best medical care in New England. Last year I was told they offered somewhere around 12,000 jobs.

As for the landscape, this includes the four seasons. The mountains are quite accessible; the Appalachian trail follows right behind the Dartmouth campus. Unfortunately no beach. Very clean, extremely low crime rates

It might not be the city you're looking for, but it's definitely worth consideration.
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Old 10-11-2018, 11:12 PM
 
2 posts, read 375 times
Reputation: 10
I'm a 30 year old single man, I live in Pittsfield. I wouldn't say it's the top recommendation for just anyone but I like it. It's quiet, older population, has some conveniences with a small downtown, and importantly for me it's close enough to commute to Manchester, where I work. However it is not as busy or fast-paced as southern NH. It really feels like an old fashioned small NH town. The downtown/village part of town is a bit blighted and poor but that's not really a bad thing for me since I live outside it and it's not scary to go in to do a bit of shopping or anything.

I also lived in Hooksett before. That might be a good first stop for you. There are plenty of rentals there, the cost to rent is high as it is in all of southern NH. It's a large suburban town with lots of stores. It's easy to get to Manchester or Concord from there. Traffic can get pretty busy but still not as bad as parts south of Manchester.

One thing to note is the further south you go in NH, especially south of Manchester, it starts to feel very suburban like it's just northern Massachusetts, the independent/libertarian vibe is less strong.
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