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Old 10-12-2018, 12:24 PM
 
62 posts, read 19,247 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rygel View Post
I'm a 30 year old single man, I live in Pittsfield. I wouldn't say it's the top recommendation for just anyone but I like it. It's quiet, older population, has some conveniences with a small downtown, and importantly for me it's close enough to commute to Manchester, where I work. However it is not as busy or fast-paced as southern NH. It really feels like an old fashioned small NH town. The downtown/village part of town is a bit blighted and poor but that's not really a bad thing for me since I live outside it and it's not scary to go in to do a bit of shopping or anything.

I also lived in Hooksett before. That might be a good first stop for you. There are plenty of rentals there, the cost to rent is high as it is in all of southern NH. It's a large suburban town with lots of stores. It's easy to get to Manchester or Concord from there. Traffic can get pretty busy but still not as bad as parts south of Manchester.

One thing to note is the further south you go in NH, especially south of Manchester, it starts to feel very suburban like it's just northern Massachusetts, the independent/libertarian vibe is less strong.

That still shouldn't have been because generally I've been a 3rd party type most of my life. It drew me to NH to some degree but then like anything, I found other things I didn't like and YES by the MA border in Nashua, a lot of people actually get paranoid of other people having guns. Closest to the malls, these people seem to be even more based on the people I interviewed with. I am no gun nut but its like come on, one person even told me she had guns or has hunted but was afraid I would kill her in her sleep when she saw me get mad once. People are unreliable. And increasingly NH has gotten worse, and no not because of muslims at all, transplanted people from other areas who have this aire about them I don't like. They're stuck up but put on a fake front. They come to my region doing this.. I Can understand if I am in another region and people are a certain way but this is like home turf to me and all these others think they can just come in and do what they want. I've had it. Nobody is fighting them tooth and nail to remove them. And what gets me is some have actually bought when the market was cheaper and good, turn around and try to make a fortune off other renters. I'd charge people dirt cheap but since I am someone who has feelings, someone who believes in giving a lower class person a break, I don't belong here. If I was a landlord, I'd charge 300-400 to the right person if they didn't disturb the peace or at least on a good behavior gets cheap rent kind of scenario but no, nobody does that here.



But anyways, yes, the libertarian vibe is dead even in Keene where most of the activists went. I think some may even be quitting over there because its been too tiring or heard some were actually moving to Manchester believe it or not. I keep up on things, I'm not stupid. But yes very little of NH is libertarian in actual practice, its mostly democrat. I think the republican strongholds are places like Windham, Bedford, Salem, Hudson, Seabrook and even then, those are watering down albeit slower. And as time goes on, it seems more alternative media outlets are moving on, it will die an establishment area I hate to say. Its a shame.
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Old 10-12-2018, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mntns., NC
10,361 posts, read 14,247,970 times
Reputation: 8907
Charlotte, NC
2 hrs. from the Blue Ridge Mountains, awesome weather, excellent healthcare, lower cost of living. (NH will get every dime you have., it IS the northeast)

Greenville, SC
Less than 1 hr. from the mountains, and ditto all the above.

Asheville, NC
Bingo ! and ditto all the above.


Best wishes on your relo. Just don't put yourself in a position of moving twice.
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Old 10-14-2018, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Midwest
3,832 posts, read 6,791,980 times
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Each locale will have a different tax load. More rural typically lower taxes. Manchester, Merrimack, Concord (aka Corncob) etc. will suck your brains dry with property taxes.
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Old 10-14-2018, 07:42 PM
 
637 posts, read 968,628 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dwatted Wabbit View Post
Each locale will have a different tax load. More rural typically lower taxes. Manchester, Merrimack, Concord (aka Corncob) etc. will suck your brains dry with property taxes.

I respectfully disagree with this assertion. Those municipalities are not even close to having the highest tax rates, nor do they have the highest property values. Most of the towns with the highest tax rates are rural (or remote/run-down "cities"), and the overall bill will depend on property values, but there are many, many people in rural municipalities with huge tax bills. Small towns without much in the way of commercial tax bases can be difficult.


(And not sure if you meant to post this on a different thread?)
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Old 10-15-2018, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Midwest
3,832 posts, read 6,791,980 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cowbell76 View Post
I respectfully disagree with this assertion. Those municipalities are not even close to having the highest tax rates, nor do they have the highest property values. Most of the towns with the highest tax rates are rural (or remote/run-down "cities"), and the overall bill will depend on property values, but there are many, many people in rural municipalities with huge tax bills. Small towns without much in the way of commercial tax bases can be difficult.


(And not sure if you meant to post this on a different thread?)
https://smartasset.com/taxes/new-ham...tax-calculator

https://www.fsp.org/understanding-pr...new-hampshire/

I'd hate to see where taxes are highest then.

Our property taxes on a quarter-million-dollar house in Marrimack went from $5000 to $10,000 in a year, around 2004. We were just moving out or I'd have been picketing city hall with a torch and a pitchfork.
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Old 10-15-2018, 09:45 AM
 
637 posts, read 968,628 times
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Check the link posted on the thread about NH taxes. It is to the official state website, with up-to-date numbers. It sounds like you haven't lived here in awhile.
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Old 10-15-2018, 09:57 AM
miu
 
Location: MA/NH
16,588 posts, read 33,625,176 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cowbell76 View Post
I respectfully disagree with this assertion. Those municipalities are not even close to having the highest tax rates, nor do they have the highest property values. Most of the towns with the highest tax rates are rural (or remote/run-down "cities"), and the overall bill will depend on property values, but there are many, many people in rural municipalities with huge tax bills. Small towns without much in the way of commercial tax bases can be difficult.


(And not sure if you meant to post this on a different thread?)
NH really does need to develop more income streams for revenue. Residential property owners are unfairly burdened with high property tax bills in most of the state. Either that or keep the school budgets in check.
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Old 10-15-2018, 10:20 AM
 
637 posts, read 968,628 times
Reputation: 740
I agree with miu but have no idea what the solution is.


I think in over a decade of looking at taxes in NH, the only generality that can be made is that you'll probably make out well if you can buy a "regular" house in one of the resort towns around the lakes. Those towns have some very expensive second homes (=bigger tax base) and yet the owners tend not to put much stress on resources (no kids in school = lower expenses for the towns.) Surprisingly, a modest house in many of those towns is not terribly expensive - not expensive enough to off-set the substantial tax savings. The challenge can sometimes be finding a job nearby.


And yeah, you might have a huge tax rate in a town, but the property values are relatively low. But do you really feel good about paying, say, $6500 on a house assessed at $200,000, when you could only really sell your house for $150,000, and the services in town are terrible? Overpaying on taxes even if your overall bill is lower than in some towns is not good.


We're getting off topic here, I think maybe Dwatted Wabbit's post was meant to go on the thread about NH taxes.
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Old Yesterday, 10:54 AM
 
52 posts, read 41,152 times
Reputation: 72
I'm still on the hunt. The job in Portsmouth was filled. I applied to another job in Concord but was not asked to come interview. I do, however, have an interview at Dartmouth-Hitchcock in a few weeks. Never been there, but not sure if such a quiet sleepy town will be for me. Perhaps my opinion will change after I visit for the interview, but I'd really like to be near the coast if possible.

As per the suggestions in this thread, I'm now also looking at Dover and Milford. I like that Milford is closer to Boston and I also like that Dover is cheaper than Portsmouth while basically being in the same vicinity and appears just as nice.

Oh, and it just so happens my employer asked me to interview for a promotion after they got a hint that I was job hunting. Funny how that works. There is a slight chance I may stay in NY for a few more years for the career opportunity but if it comes down to the wire I don't think it'll be enough of a reason to stay.

Thank you all for sharing. I will update as things unfold for anyone interested.
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Old Yesterday, 01:56 PM
KCZ
 
1,595 posts, read 802,185 times
Reputation: 4421
Hanover is a small college town, and Lebanon is a small family town, both with minimal crime. Because of the college influence, they are more liberal than most of northern NH. They are about 45 minutes from the mtns, and 2 hours from beaches or Boston. While a nice place to live, I'm not sure this area is compatible with the things you mentioned in your original post.
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