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Old 11-17-2008, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Utopia
1,999 posts, read 6,603,486 times
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I am in a location now that has dry winter air, and I had a doozy of a headache yesterday from it. I took Benadryl, but hate to do this every day during the winter.
I can only assume since I read N.H. has DRY air that many of you on this board suffer from the same. What do you do for it? How do you stop it or am I the only one who seems to get sinus headaches from such dry cold air?
And how long do your dry and cold winters last there, by the way???
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Old 11-17-2008, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Vermont
3,018 posts, read 6,051,485 times
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I get them quite often in the winter. I find that running a humidifier in rooms in my house that I frequent help.
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Old 11-17-2008, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Manchester, NH
282 posts, read 795,277 times
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I put humidifiers in all bedrooms and have them running all night and one on the first floor running during the day in the winter. If you have a wood stove, you can put a big kettle or pot on the stove with water in it. Don't take Benadryl, unless you have a runny nose, cause that stuff dries you out more. Drink plenty of water, and take nice steamy showers.
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Old 11-17-2008, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Vermont
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Good point about the kettle on the woodstove. We do that too.
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Old 11-17-2008, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Monadnock region
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we don't have a woodstove, so DH goes around cutting the tops off soda cans and filling them with water and setting them on the baseboard radiators! Unfortunately the cats get curious and knock them off.
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Old 11-18-2008, 09:17 AM
 
Location: New Hampshire
452 posts, read 1,100,779 times
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It's a typical problem during the heating system. Once the heating system starts for the winter, it can dry your home out pretty well. Besides your nose, it will also affect wood floors, furniture, cabinets and trim. It's a great time to bring out those haunted stories as the home creeks with the shrinkage due to the dryness.

If you have a forced hot air heating system, a whole house humidifier can be installed on your system. Normally, I don't recommend them due to the units receiving little to no maintenance. They can cause damage to the heating system if not maintained but, it can be the best way to add moisture to the entire home.

Clothes Dryer vents have been known to be used for adding humidity to homes during times when needed. Just remember that "excessive" moisture in the home can lead to other problems. Hardware stores and such should have "lint catchers" available. Just make sure it is cleaned out when needed.

One old time remedy is to purchase a folding clothes rack and place wet articles of clothes on it to dry. The evaporation of the water will help humidify the home as well as dry your clothes. Hey.....I didn't say it was pretty! It's also a good time to wash curtains and hang wet to dry straight. But what do I know. I don't do the laundry here...

Hope this helps....
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Old 11-18-2008, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
33,788 posts, read 29,215,017 times
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I don't use the bathroom vent fan in the winter. All the damp heated air is dumped onto the bedroom area of the house by opening the door. The dryer rack is a good idea. Instead of drying the towels and venting the moisture outside hang them on a drying rack in the room your spend most of your time. A large bath towel holds a LOT of water. A good indicator of moisture levels is condensation on outside windows. If you see condensation on insulated windows there is generally enough moisture in the air. If you see ice get better insulated windows.
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Old 01-01-2014, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Middle America
18,098 posts, read 15,621,234 times
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Topping the thread, because I am dying. I grew up in a place that has very dry, cold winters, but have lived the past half dozen years in a more mild climate that is not nearly so cold/dry in the winter...stays more humid year 'round. However, my fiance is military, and we moved this past fall back up north, and the extreme switch back to very, very dry is killing me this winter. I wake up every morning with a splitting headache that doesn't go away...steaming showers aren't enough to combat it.

The obvious answer is to run humidifiers, but we live in a base-provided house in military housing, and our lease agreement stipulates that we may not run humidifiers. I think it's stupid, but they are newly built houses, and I get they are trying to protect against mold. However, the rooms are large and well-ventilated, and I doubt that running humidifiers in the winter would cause mold issues. I've been filling a basin with boiling water and making a tent with a big towel and putting my face over it each morning, but it's only doing so much. My fiance has been going around putting pie tins of water on the mantle when the gas fireplace is going, and simmering a stockpot of water. We can't really do anything that alters the house in any permanent way, but what else can I do to help with this godforsaken dryness? These headaches are seriously a hindrance. Today, I feel like I have the worst hangover headache, and we didn't even drink last night for New Year's! I know it's the dryness. We spent the past several days back in our hometown area, where it's much more humid, and I didn't wake up a single morning with a headache, but it's a daily occurrence, here.
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Old 01-01-2014, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Barrington, NH!
750 posts, read 860,493 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Topping the thread, because I am dying. I grew up in a place that has very dry, cold winters, but have lived the past half dozen years in a more mild climate that is not nearly so cold/dry in the winter...stays more humid year 'round. However, my fiance is military, and we moved this past fall back up north, and the extreme switch back to very, very dry is killing me this winter. I wake up every morning with a splitting headache that doesn't go away...steaming showers aren't enough to combat it.

The obvious answer is to run humidifiers, but we live in a base-provided house in military housing, and our lease agreement stipulates that we may not run humidifiers. I think it's stupid, but they are newly built houses, and I get they are trying to protect against mold. However, the rooms are large and well-ventilated, and I doubt that running humidifiers in the winter would cause mold issues. I've been filling a basin with boiling water and making a tent with a big towel and putting my face over it each morning, but it's only doing so much. My fiance has been going around putting pie tins of water on the mantle when the gas fireplace is going, and simmering a stockpot of water. We can't really do anything that alters the house in any permanent way, but what else can I do to help with this godforsaken dryness? These headaches are seriously a hindrance. Today, I feel like I have the worst hangover headache, and we didn't even drink last night for New Year's! I know it's the dryness. We spent the past several days back in our hometown area, where it's much more humid, and I didn't wake up a single morning with a headache, but it's a daily occurrence, here.
I'm in Minot, ND, and it's -6 right now. We live in a poorly built, 3 year old house on base and when it gets this cold we have a humidifier going 24/7 both downstairs and upstairs. They are $50 warm-mist units with 1-gallon tanks. They take the humidity from well below 20% to 30+%, which is the lower level of what is considered comfortable and healthy. Makes a difference. A better built, better insulated house would not have quite the dryness of a cheap, drafty house because the hot-air furnace would not have to run as much, but the AF cheaped out when building this lot of houses. I hate this wretched place and can't wait to come back home. Good luck.
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Old 01-02-2014, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Nashua
368 posts, read 590,789 times
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I know it's dry when I see the water level on our fish tank drop! Two days ago I had to add some water! (Is it dry, or did the fish just drink all that water?) Anyway, we have humidifiers in the bedrooms and have not needed them in the rest of the house.
However, we do use hand lotion on our hands and faces (ears too) That makes a difference. If I'm going to be outside for any length of time I put on an extra application of lotion.
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