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Old 04-28-2011, 10:39 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
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"backs onto a school" needs to be better defined. I'd think a home that backed against some of these large athletic fields; especially one without lights, would be more attractive than a row of homes.
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Old 04-29-2011, 05:44 AM
 
557 posts, read 606,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LNTT_Vacationer View Post
"backs onto a school" needs to be better defined. I'd think a home that backed against some of these large athletic fields; especially one without lights, would be more attractive than a row of homes.
Well, I'm not sure that it's a matter of a house next to school being more or less attractive than series of row homes, or apartment complexes. The issue is that there a number of factors that could reduce your buying pool - so if you have the option, and especially if you aren't planning on being in your home for 30 years - it's not a bad idea to try to avoid the factors that might keep buyers away. On the other hand, if resale is just not on your mind and you don't care about living near a school, then perhaps you just don't give it another thought.

I'm not a real estate expert, I just read a boat load to try to ensure we didn't make a bad choice. Among some of the factors that we came across that were potentials to avoid were 1) homes that bordered schools 2) homes that bordered apartment complexes 3) homes on a busy street 4) homes on the corner of cross streets (the books we read indicated it was best to be nestled within a street)). 5) homes bumping up on a train line/ on bus lines/ etc.

I think the main point was that all of these factors will increase noise level/ traffic.
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Old 04-29-2011, 06:47 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by templeu View Post
Well, I'm not sure that it's a matter of a house next to school being more or less attractive than series of row homes, or apartment complexes. The issue is that there a number of factors that could reduce your buying pool - so if you have the option, and especially if you aren't planning on being in your home for 30 years - it's not a bad idea to try to avoid the factors that might keep buyers away. On the other hand, if resale is just not on your mind and you don't care about living near a school, then perhaps you just don't give it another thought.

I'm not a real estate expert, I just read a boat load to try to ensure we didn't make a bad choice. Among some of the factors that we came across that were potentials to avoid were 1) homes that bordered schools 2) homes that bordered apartment complexes 3) homes on a busy street 4) homes on the corner of cross streets (the books we read indicated it was best to be nestled within a street)). 5) homes bumping up on a train line/ on bus lines/ etc.

I think the main point was that all of these factors will increase noise level/ traffic.
I agree that the cookie cutter house in the middle of the street surrounded by 8 others (two on the sides; three front, three back) is easy for a buyer to process. It is the safe buy; anything else requires a thought process; some well accepted and positive - people will pay a premium to be on a golf course, a loud power boat lake, state forest; many other locations are neg.

A school is interesting but there are significantly different scenarios; a small elementary school in an urban neighborhood or one as they're built today - a sprawling complex surrounded by a large tract of land. Backing into the latter sounds more peaceful and desirable to me than three homes but I agree with you in that, to a new buyer such as the OP, such location is "out of the box."
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Old 04-29-2011, 07:42 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LNTT_Vacationer View Post
I agree that the cookie cutter house in the middle of the street surrounded by 8 others (two on the sides; three front, three back) is easy for a buyer to process. It is the safe buy; anything else requires a thought process; some well accepted and positive - people will pay a premium to be on a golf course, a loud power boat lake, state forest; many other locations are neg.

A school is interesting but there are significantly different scenarios; a small elementary school in an urban neighborhood or one as they're built today - a sprawling complex surrounded by a large tract of land. Backing into the latter sounds more peaceful and desirable to me than three homes but I agree with you in that, to a new buyer such as the OP, such location is "out of the box."
Who says such homes have to be cookie cutter? Stroll down a typical street in Haddonfield for instance.. one will find an older home with tons of character that is anything but cookie cutter. I definitely did not want to be in a sub-division where every home looked the same, or in a cul-de-sac sort of environment... and was able to find a street where every home looked different, had tons of character, with yards, that was close to schools - but not immediately next to, close to public transport, but not immediately next to, on a fairly quiet street (primary noise is kids at play... which I could do without...but I realize that will appeal to the typical buyer for this neighborhood).

Again, I think the main point is to understand the market in which you're buying and have handle on what the people in that market will want / not want. If you are buying in the burbs - a typical burb home buyer will be different in what they're looking for than a city home buyer. I fully recognize I'm an atypical burb home buyer - so when looking for a home, I had to think about what the ramifications would be when I go to sell (b/c I don't plan to stay in this house forever...just long enough that renting didn't make sense any longer).
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Old 04-29-2011, 08:30 AM
 
1,298 posts, read 610,898 times
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Some of the houses on our street back up to our High School. We have a wooded area that seperates the houses from the High School. We carefully picked out house to not be directly next to the High School however we can still see the parking lots and lights, especially during the winter months. A few drawbacks but nothing really too major:

-Lights can always been seen at night.
-When the High School band practices and they practice quite a bit (nationally ranked band from what I hear), it can be really, really, really, really (did I say really enough? ) loud, especially when they are using the metronome. There is no way to get away from the noise. When school lets out, it can also be noisy with kids in the parking lots revving up their cars
-Late at night, some teens will joyride in the parking lot. Screeching tires, horns, etc.
-Some high schoolers from our neighborhood will take a short cut from our development through the woods and to the school. Some houses along the direct path have teens traipsing through their property on a daily basis. One woman had a teen jump over her fence when she was in the yard
-A few teens try to break the rules and park their cars along our street and walk through the woods to school. It can be pretty annoying.

One edit: Just saw your comment that it was a Middle School. Our local Middle School is pretty darned busy too. Many athletic fields and the football field is a multi purpose one. Lots of lots of traffic and many lights.

Last edited by Siggy20; 04-29-2011 at 08:45 AM..
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Old 04-29-2011, 12:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by templeu View Post
Located near a school and bumping up right next to the school are different ball games. Not all buyers want to deal with the noise that comes with kids coming and going in the AM, and the certain traffic of buses, cars, etc of kids being dropped off and picked up in the AM and PM. When you sell a house you don't want to limit your buying pool in any way. A single person or dual income family with no kids might look unfavorably at being right next to a school. While it's true that some buyers might like to be immediately next to the school - there are more who might not.
No one is forcing anyone without kids to move near a school. A family with kids I think would find it pretty ideal.
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Old 04-29-2011, 12:22 PM
 
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Originally Posted by HubCityMadMan View Post
No one is forcing anyone without kids to move near a school. A family with kids I think would find it pretty ideal.
Ya - because I said that someone with no kids would be forced to do so. Sheesh.

When in a down market, like we are - would you want to eliminate anyone from your potential buying pool? I was only pointing out information that I read that indicated you could restrict your future buying pool - when you go to resell, should you buy a home that is located next to a school. For some people, this might make 0 shred of difference. For others, potential re-sale value is in the back of their minds when they buy.
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Old 04-30-2011, 04:19 PM
 
1,298 posts, read 610,898 times
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Originally Posted by HubCityMadMan View Post
No one is forcing anyone without kids to move near a school. A family with kids I think would find it pretty ideal.
I think that living near a school with the ability for kids to walk would be fantastic. Would I want my property to back up to the school? No thanks. The schools, at least in our area, are smack dab in the middle of neighborhoods with narrow streets and tons of traffic. I think it depends greatly on how the house is situated in comparison to the school.

The houses backed up to my kids elementary school? Wouldn't wish that on my enemy.
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Old 05-01-2011, 05:36 AM
 
349 posts, read 450,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LNTT_Vacationer View Post
"backs onto a school" needs to be better defined. I'd think a home that backed against some of these large athletic fields; especially one without lights, would be more attractive than a row of homes.
The lights issue was one dh and I were talking about last night. It's a big school so I think the chances they may have flood lights for night time sporting events may be high.
Quote:
Originally Posted by templeu View Post
On the other hand, if resale is just not on your mind and you don't care about living near a school, then perhaps you just don't give it another thought.

I'm not a real estate expert, I just read a boat load to try to ensure we didn't make a bad choice.
Exactly why I made this thread.
Quote:
Originally Posted by templeu View Post
I think the main point was that all of these factors will increase noise level/ traffic.
Well, being at the back of the school, and I don't believe their are any paths in that area, I don't think it would increase traffic, but noise may definitely be a deterrent.

Someone else mentioned that it would be a deterrent to a single buyer or family without kids, but honestly I don't think those particular people would be looking at a 4-bedroom house near a school in the first place.

However, we are definitely thinking about re-sale so I think we have decided not to go with the home.

Thanks for all your input.
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Old 05-01-2011, 05:42 AM
 
349 posts, read 450,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HubCityMadMan View Post
That would be a huge plus IMO since the kids could walk or ride a bike to school rather than take the bus.

I know they are not putting schools in developments anymore like they used to. It is a shame because then more kids could walk and you could save budget on school transportation then.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linmora View Post
I think that living near a school with the ability for kids to walk would be fantastic. Would I want my property to back up to the school? No thanks. The schools, at least in our area, are smack dab in the middle of neighborhoods with narrow streets and tons of traffic. I think it depends greatly on how the house is situated in comparison to the school.
The houses backed up to my kids elementary school? Wouldn't wish that on my enemy.
I would so love to be within walking distance of my sons' schools. They have never had to bus before and I am finding most of the homes we are interested in are quite a distance from the schools. I guess it has to do with financial reasons why schools are not built within residential neighborhoods (or the "not in my backyard" syndrome) but it is disappointing to me that I won't be able to walk them to school anymore...it's a great way to get stay in contact with what is going on at school.
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