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Old 09-01-2012, 12:48 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
20,259 posts, read 25,230,735 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rawlife View Post
For the record, I'd be teaching French and am also thinking of getting a Special Ed specialization as well.
Those do not go together. It's very, very unlikely that you'd be teaching French in a special ed setting. Go to a teacher & get connected to someone from NJEA who can advise you.. My sister taught special ed for 36 years. It is not for the faint of heart. It isn't a fall back. People who teach special ed should have a calling.
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Old 09-01-2012, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Burl. County, NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
My sister taught special ed for 36 years. It is not for the faint of heart. It isn't a fall back. People who teach special ed should have a calling.
I agree but... special ed isn't the same as it was 30, 20, or 10 years ago. Chances are she wouldn't be in a self contained classroom with 6 children who are on the severe end of the autism spectrum. Many to most districts in NJ have classes in the inclusion setting. So 15 students in the class would be "regular ed" and 5-10 students classified as "special ed" would be in the same classroom. Many special ed classified students have ADD or some kind of "unspecified learning disability" and some modifications would include extended time on tests, word banks, chunking and splicing of assignments, and some extra attention to make sure they're on task.

At my school Spanish is way more popular but if she had a Spanish cert and a special ed cert I think she would be extremely marketable today. At a larger school I'm sure there are more French students and I assume would have a similar need to Spanish.
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Old 12-26-2013, 01:54 PM
 
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I am a teacher in the state of Georgia and honestly thinking about relocating to New Jersey to teach. I have to work two jobs here in Ga. just to be able to supply my daily needs. I haven't shopped in the Mall for years. I have a Ed. S in Curriculum and Instruction and still make under 50,000. I am really looking for a good stable teaching job that pays a comfortable salary.
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Old 12-27-2013, 06:41 AM
 
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Dont forget Health care.. to my uninformed knowledge, NJ teachers pay nothing towards very good health-care, while in the private work sector the employee contribution for most is in the multiples of thousands.

And I know there are summer workshops, and continuing education... but for the most part your summers are off.

Did you say "Teaching French?"
Now your screwed. Most districts except for the elite cant afford to keep Music education, Industrial Arts and Home Ec in the school... let alone French instruction :-)
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Old 12-27-2013, 01:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bellmark View Post
Dont forget Health care.. to my uninformed knowledge, NJ teachers pay nothing towards very good health-care, while in the private work sector the employee contribution for most is in the multiples of thousands.

And I know there are summer workshops, and continuing education... but for the most part your summers are off.

Did you say "Teaching French?"
Now your screwed. Most districts except for the elite cant afford to keep Music education, Industrial Arts and Home Ec in the school... let alone French instruction :-)
Teachers (lumping all non-administrative district employees into that title) do pay for a portion of their healtchare in NJ. Prior to the reform law passed by Christie, it was negotiated on an ad-hoc basis between local teachers unions and the district that they worked for. In this way, teachers in Cherry Hill may have paid 5% of their premium cost, while teachers in Haddonfield would pay 4% and teachers in Haddon Heights would pay nothing. What would generally happen is that the teachers unions would leverage the last round of negotiations with each district to attempt to force the pay up and the benefits cost down compared to whomever they last negotiated with. Individual healthcare packages were also negotiated this way, so each district may have slightly different healthcare offerings, but all were generally "good to great".

Since the reform law was passed teachers are now required to a pay a porition of the premium (the exact plan and coverage is still negotiated between the local union and the district) based on their salary and whether they are opting for single, single + spouse or family coverage. A teacher who earns the state average of $65,000 and opts for family coverage is now responsible for paying 19% of the premium cost for that policy. So, if the policy costs $15,000, the teacher would pay $2,850. According to many sources this is inline with private sector employers who generally aim for an 80/20 employer/employee split of benefits cost.
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Old 12-27-2013, 01:43 PM
 
570 posts, read 925,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJGOAT View Post
Since the reform law was passed teachers are now required to a pay a porition of the premium
Thanks for clarifying (correcting!) my misinformation

I just looked it up on the NJEA website. They have a PDF that explains the escalating costs over 4 years.
At 4 years (where we basically are now) what you say is inline... and in fact, teachers making at 100k range will pay a significant higher percentage.


NJEA.org - Pensions

Link to PDF
The impact of Chapter 78 on your take-home pay
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Old 01-01-2014, 06:59 AM
 
198 posts, read 391,384 times
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It also appears that Christie's pension reforms eliminated the cost of living adjustment from the pension. That's a huge cut to benefits but was probably necessary for the long term viability of the plan.

If you stick it out as a NJ teacher you will eventually make a very strong salary in your later years (currently close to 6 figures in some high schools).
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