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Old 01-12-2015, 06:09 PM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
8,776 posts, read 14,372,822 times
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Originally Posted by Retriever View Post
Those old mansions are also occupied--to a fairly significant extent--by affluent younger gay "urban homesteaders" who saw relative bargains, and snapped them up. I agree overall with your observations, but your impression of who occupies those old mansions is a few decades out of date.

You're absolutely right, I just got tired of typing so I stopped at the old people. I know a few people who live there for the bargains and send their kids to private schools. Some of those Sleepy Hollow houses can't be duplicated for 4 times their price.
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Old 01-12-2015, 08:24 PM
 
191 posts, read 256,165 times
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Lol its funny you mention that about the gay homeowners.My wifes distant uncle invited us over for christmas one year in that area of plainfield and as it turned out he was gay and shared the house with his partner.I understand that reversing the urban decay in Plainfield isn't the easiest thing in the world, but seems a lot more doable considering its a smaller area than a lot of cities in nj in even worse condition.I say this because sometimes revitalization isnt as hard as people might believe.A lot of times it takes changing town policy and tax incentive to promote change from within the community.I moved from nj to a town in Pennsylvania that once upon a time was in a state like plainfield, lots of crime,gangs,drugs, and going through town at that time kind of sketched me out driving through.Several years later I came back up and it was like night and day.The building were all redone,their was all new bars and restaurants where vacancy had been, graffitti had been scrubbed over,and the police really buffed up their ranks and had a much stronger presense in the community.It took several years but it worked and now this area thrives!To me it seems like the same could be done in an area like plainfield.
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Old 04-14-2015, 07:54 AM
 
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The NYC commute from Plainfield on the Raritan Valley train line was door to door under an hour be 40 minutes when built in the mid 1800s, around which Plainfield was formed in the first place.

Today it is double that or more with delays and the grimy transfer in Newark, which includes lots of missed connections and stairs.

The new Hudson tunnel, half built before Christie became governor, aimed to fix that problem. Commuting from Plainfield promised to be a decent commute again for white collar New Yorkers who wanted to enjoy suburban life in a decent house, volunteer for their communities, be home for dinner -- and still work in The City (only 20-25 miles away). Those mansions would get fixed overnight with a short commute, property values (and tax receipts) would jump (obviously).

Then Christie pulled the plug on the tunnel. It sits half-built, abandoned. Meanwhile he just diverted state worker pension fund money to fix the roads he drives on!

It's complicated. But it's not complicated. Bottom line, I would not lay blame for the state of Plainfield at the feet of its current residents alone. There is plenty of blame to go around. There are also MANY first class families there today -- white, black and brown. With or without the tunnel (which really is the magic bullet), Plainfield is far from over.
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Old 08-29-2016, 09:26 PM
 
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i grew up in scotch plains and fanwood. graduated from rutgers. knew plainfield very well; teppers, surprise store, texas weiners, frontier diner--all of it. most of you, when discussing the civil disobedience of the 60s appear to be disgruntled, at least potential white trump supporters, talking about "undesirables". who do think were the mistreated class of people supporting the millionaire culture? those SAME "undesirables". many of you DISGUST me.
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Old 10-07-2016, 09:44 PM
 
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When Arthur & Myra Goldstein opened "Arthur's Store" on Front Street in Plainfield, New Jersey in 1946 my father, Howard R. Marks, became their first employee. Originally "Arthur's" was located on the South Side of Front St in Plainfield, however they soon out grew the small one aisle retail store and moved across to the North Side of Front St. into a larger store. As I recall the new store had a main floor, a basement and a second floor full of household items such as pots & pans, lamps, toys, hardware, paint, window screens and blinds etc. My dad worked there for 25 years until his death in 1971. I have fond memories of downtown Plainfield and the great variety of retail stores which were very vibrant especially during the Xmas Season and when they were open late on Thursday nights. "Arthur's" expanded and opened stores in New Brunswick and Morristown over the years my dad worked there. I believe after my dad passed Arthur's opened a store on US Route 22 in Greenbrook, however I moved away in 1971 and lost touch with the area. Howard Goldstein, Arthur & Myra's son, who was a graduate of Plainfield HS, recently died in Boca Raton, Florida.
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Old 10-07-2016, 09:45 PM
 
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Default Arthur's Store, Plainfield, NJ

When Arthur & Myra Goldstein opened "Arthur's Store" on Front Street in Plainfield, New Jersey in 1946 my father, Howard R. Marks, became their first employee. Originally "Arthur's" was located on the South Side of Front St in Plainfield, however they soon out grew the small one aisle retail store and moved across to the North Side of Front St. into a larger store. As I recall the new store had a main floor, a basement and a second floor full of household items such as pots & pans, lamps, toys, hardware, paint, window screens and blinds etc. My dad worked there for 25 years until his death in 1971. I have fond memories of downtown Plainfield and the great variety of retail stores which were very vibrant especially during the Xmas Season and when they were open late on Thursday nights. "Arthur's" expanded and opened stores in New Brunswick and Morristown over the years my dad worked there. I believe after my dad passed Arthur's opened a store on US Route 22 in Greenbrook, however I moved away in 1971 and lost touch with the area. Howard Goldstein, Arthur & Myra's son, who was a graduate of Plainfield HS, recently died in Boca Raton, Florida.
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Old 10-21-2016, 01:58 PM
 
Location: North Oakland
9,000 posts, read 8,337,205 times
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Originally Posted by coolhandred View Post
When Arthur & Myra Goldstein opened "Arthur's Store" on Front Street in Plainfield, New Jersey in 1946 my father, Howard R. Marks, became their first employee.
Jane?
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Old 04-25-2017, 12:09 PM
 
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yes, it was right out of a cheever novel. chain-smokers, commuting cars, high balls, scandleous divorces, wardlaw-hartridge, alcoholism, the plainfield country club, bankrupcy. i loved it so much then and i still love it, despite its changes.
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Old 12-20-2018, 07:39 AM
 
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Gruening’s had the best ice cream! I used to get chocolate mint with marshmallow sauce. There was an excellent German bakery (anybody remember its name), which made crumb cake! My mother liked Texas Weiners, even though they weren’t kosher, which was owned by a guy who won the lottery.
Every Sunday nite, we ate “chinks” (sorry, not pc), at Lichee’s, which had the best egg rolls and spare ribs (again not kosher).
We sometimes shopped at the Surprise Shop; Teppers was a fine shop. And I ate lunch every week with my dad at the Sleepy Hollow Luncheonette on East Front Street. On Easter/Passover my Nan bought me a baby chick from Woolworth’s, where there was a fountain (counter), and pictures of a grilled cheese sandwich. There was fish dinners from Snuffy’s in Fanwood (I think); and a great pizza
from Manville. We often went to Updyke’s for the cheeseburger and onion rings. (I guess we spent a lot of time eating in the 60’s).
I preferred the Strand movie theatre over the Oxford.
My dad had a sign shop, called Schneider Signs. I loved going to his shop!
Oh, those memories of halcyon days!
Paul J.Schneider. PHS class of ‘69
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Old 12-24-2018, 01:13 PM
 
Location: North Oakland
9,000 posts, read 8,337,205 times
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Originally Posted by PaulJSchneider View Post
There was an excellent German bakery (anybody remember its name), which made crumb cake!
Stire's, on Park Avenue between 6th and 7th. Their cinnamon buns (not like today's typical cinnamon rolls) were also excellent. My grandmother brought both home every Thursday.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulJSchneider View Post
Every Sunday nite, we ate “chinks” (sorry, not pc), at Lichee’s, which had the best egg rolls and spare ribs (again not kosher).
Was that on W. Front, between Grant and Plainfield Avenues? We never ate Chinese food. I didn't have a single bite of it until I lived in NY and had a friend who liked to go down to Chinatown after midnight.

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Originally Posted by PaulJSchneider View Post
We sometimes shopped at the Surprise Shop;
Surprise Store, wasn't it? I bought surfer jackets there. And Henley shirts.

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Originally Posted by PaulJSchneider View Post
Teppers was a fine shop.
We shopped there, Bamberger's, and Park Gentry. I worked in Tepper's men's department in my junior and senior years at PHS. I remember Alan Paine sweaters costing $16, plus I got a discount. And then I went to college and everything went "hippie." I still wore my sweaters and OC shirts, only with bell-bottoms.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulJSchneider View Post
And I ate lunch every week with my dad at the Sleepy Hollow Luncheonette on East Front Street.
I would occasionally hang out there with the hippies on Saturdays and Thursday nights.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulJSchneider View Post
There was fish dinners from Snuffy’s in Fanwood (I think);
Fanwood or Scotch Plains. Who could tell the difference? I always got clams.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulJSchneider View Post
and a great pizza from Manville.
You didn't go to Conca D'Oro, two successive locations on W. Front Street, for pizza? Oh, I am so glad I didn't miss that. It is still my standard for good pizza.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulJSchneider View Post
We often went to Updyke’s for the cheeseburger and onion rings. (I guess we spent a lot of time eating in the 60’s).
I went there when I turned 17 and could drive. Mainly I ate cheeseburgers at Frontier Diner and Gruning's (my favorite).

https://njmonthly.com/articles/eat-d...-fudge-heaven/

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulJSchneider View Post
I preferred the Strand movie theatre over the Oxford.
I don't remember the Oxford. The Strand was my favorite, too, but the two others I remember were the Paramount (W. 2nd and Park, across from Lafayette Electronics, on the future urban renewal site) and the Liberty (Front & Liberty).

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulJSchneider View Post
My dad had a sign shop, called Schneider Signs. I loved going to his shop!
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulJSchneider View Post
Oh, those memories of halcyon days!
Some I'd like to go back to; some not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulJSchneider View Post
Paul J.Schneider. PHS class of ‘69
I might remember you. I'm not sure. I'll PM you.
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