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Old 09-10-2011, 10:39 AM
 
Location: NJ/NY
9,763 posts, read 9,554,733 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hashford View Post
i visited last about two years ago...should have specified i was speaking of during the week. course fridays and saturdays will be busy. dont know where that buffet was i just thought we were near Red Bank..there was a theater and (odd) a funeral home in the same parking lot. down here people eat out 3 or more times a week easy. it seems to be cheaper to eat out at the fast food places. the next level up- t.g.i's, cracker barrels, applebee's get plenty of business also specially with coupons. hoping this explanation will calm down some of you!! the main thing was i just noticed this difference and was wondering why.maybe you guys pay all your money to property taxes, maybe its tradition to stay home, i dont know. i did notice that the people of N.j. are healthier looking. here the majority are obese.
I'm glad you said it before I did. Whenever I go visit my brother in Atlanta, it never ceases to amaze me how many morbidly obese people are there. There are obese people in all states, but the prevalence in Atlanta is very noticeably increased from the norm.
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Old 09-10-2011, 10:43 AM
 
Location: NJ
22,876 posts, read 28,777,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hashford View Post
i visited last about two years ago...should have specified i was speaking of during the week. course fridays and saturdays will be busy.
in new jersey, it is only legal for restaurants to be open friday and saturday. every other day during the week they must be closed for business. the only exception is one chinese buffet in the red bank area.
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Old 09-10-2011, 10:52 AM
 
1,896 posts, read 3,732,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
LOL, I meant to say that, too, and forgot to include it in my post. I don't consider where we live (I'm fewer than ten minutes from Red Bank) SOUTH Jersey. We are central. Then again, I used to have a coworker who lived in Oakland and complained about having to "go all the way to South Jersey" to visit her brother. Who lived in Edison. And I once met a guy in Atlantic City who told me he had been to North Jersey--Forked River. Too many people are geographically challenged.

I'm thinking about splurging on a nice steak dinner tonight myself, in the comfort of my own home, in my plaid jammie pants, hehehe. I've got corn and tomatoes and other salad stuff from the local farm. Just need the steak. Alas, I shall have to comb my hair and put on clothing to go to the supermarket, but at least I won't have to leave anyone a tip after dinner.
Bwahahahaha. I am a lifelong North Jersey resident (Essex, Hudson & Morris Counties). I attended college at Rutgers, New Brunswick. I was a pretty myopic 18 year-old, as far as having seen the world...or even just the rest of NJ other than my own backyard, lol. So, I thought New Brunswick was South Jersey and kept referring to it as such! My new Rutgers friends included a LOT of Central & South Jersey kids and, after they stopped rolling their eyes, they kindly educated me.

Enjoy your steak!
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Old 09-10-2011, 11:01 AM
 
1,896 posts, read 3,732,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hashford View Post
down here people eat out 3 or more times a week easy. it seems to be cheaper to eat out at the fast food places. the next level up- t.g.i's, cracker barrels, applebee's get plenty of business also specially with coupons. [...] here the majority are obese.
Actually, this is quite interesting. I'm not too familiar with Georgia, specifically, but I do know that when they come out with those lists of "Most Unhealthy" or "Most Obese" states, it's always some of the southern states that top those lists and I think Georgia might be one of those states.

Maybe, one thing to consider is the concept of the "FOOD DESERT".

This is a geographic area where it is hard to find a supermarket or grocery store that offers a WIDE and AFFORDABLE selection of healthier, whole, unprocessed foods. The grocery stores, when you find them, don't have very large or well-stocked fresh produce departments with a lot of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, etc. etc.

In a food desert, instead of grocery stores like that, you will find a lot more fast food chains and chain restaurants, as well as convenience stores that don't offer too much fresh produce if at all, and unhealthy, prepackaged (expensive) foods, junk food, etc. etc. In a food desert it is easier and cheaper to eat out and get takeout, and it is harder and more expensive to cook your own, more health conscious meals.

Mostly, food deserts are an URBAN phenomenon...at least, up here in the northeast. But maybe they are more common in other, non urban areas as well, down south?

In NJ, it's cheaper to go to the grocery store, and most towns have more than one...A&P, ShopRite, Pathmark, Foodtown, Stop & Shop, Acme, Whole Foods, Trader Joe's. Not to mention the farmer's markets that have sprouted up everywhere. And then when you consider the grocery stores that are just an extra 10 minutes away in the town above you, below you, to the right and to the left (remember...NJ is densely populated), you probably have a choice of TEN different grocery stores well stocked with fresh produce. Eating out...even at a chain restaurant...is expensive and considered more of a luxury convenience than a routine way of eating.
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Old 09-10-2011, 11:02 AM
 
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In the Bridgewater area (right in the heart of Routes 78, 202, 206, 22) there about two dozen "chain" restaurants that always seem busy. Then there are smaller Mom and Pop restaurants all over (many are BYOB).
These restaurants are always busy too on weekends.

Perhaps during the week, it may not be as busy because here, in central Jersey, what we have is a large percentage of families...and families mean soccer, baseball, PTA meetings, lacrosse, etc. etc.) during the week.
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Old 09-10-2011, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
51,772 posts, read 50,991,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seque5tra View Post
Bwahahahaha. I am a lifelong North Jersey resident (Essex, Hudson & Morris Counties). I attended college at Rutgers, New Brunswick. I was a pretty myopic 18 year-old, as far as having seen the world...or even just the rest of NJ other than my own backyard, lol. So, I thought New Brunswick was South Jersey and kept referring to it as such! My new Rutgers friends included a LOT of Central & South Jersey kids and, after they stopped rolling their eyes, they kindly educated me.

Enjoy your steak!
Thanks, I will. I was pretty ignorant about our own state when I was that age, too. I grew up in Northwest Bergen County, and considered Bergen County to be Ridgewood, Midland Park, Wyckoff, Franklin Lakes, Oakland, Mahwah, Allendale, Waldwick...then I got a temp job at the Bergen County board of elections where I had to file absentee ballots by town and was shocked to discover that there were 70 towns in Bergen County, some of which I'd never even heard of.

Then, after secretarial school, at 20 I got a job in NYC. Found out that the world was pretty big. There were a number of people in my office who lived in or were originally from Jersey City. I was amazed that they seemed so educated and normal--I always thought JC was a place where everyone was poor and/or a criminal.

Looking back, I can't believe how insular our world was.
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Old 09-10-2011, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
51,772 posts, read 50,991,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seque5tra View Post
Actually, this is quite interesting. I'm not too familiar with Georgia, specifically, but I do know that when they come out with those lists of "Most Unhealthy" or "Most Obese" states, it's always some of the southern states that top those lists and I think Georgia might be one of those states.

Maybe, one thing to consider is the concept of the "FOOD DESERT".

This is a geographic area where it is hard to find a supermarket or grocery store that offers a WIDE and AFFORDABLE selection of healthier, whole, unprocessed foods. The grocery stores, when you find them, don't have very large or well-stocked fresh produce departments with a lot of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, etc. etc.

In a food desert, instead of grocery stores like that, you will find a lot more fast food chains and chain restaurants, as well as convenience stores that don't offer too much fresh produce if at all, and unhealthy, prepackaged (expensive) foods, junk food, etc. etc. In a food desert it is easier and cheaper to eat out and get takeout, and it is harder and more expensive to cook your own, more health conscious meals.

Mostly, food deserts are an URBAN phenomenon...at least, up here in the northeast. But maybe they are more common in other, non urban areas as well, down south?

In NJ, it's cheaper to go to the grocery store, and most towns have more than one...A&P, ShopRite, Pathmark, Foodtown, Stop & Shop, Acme, Whole Foods, Trader Joe's. Not to mention the farmer's markets that have sprouted up everywhere. And then when you consider the grocery stores that are just an extra 10 minutes away in the town above you, below you, to the right and to the left (remember...NJ is densely populated), you probably have a choice of TEN different grocery stores well stocked with fresh produce. Eating out...even at a chain restaurant...is expensive and considered more of a luxury convenience than a routine way of eating.
Good post. Yes, I've been reading about food deserts lately. Where I am, I have about three supermarkets within a five-minute drive, plus farm stands about ten minutes away, plus a Trader Joe's two minutes away and a Whole Foods ten minutes away....everything is so close by.
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Old 09-10-2011, 11:46 AM
 
1,896 posts, read 3,732,241 times
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More on FOOD DESERTS:

Food Desert Locator

The pink highlighted blobs indicate areas that are food deserts.


Here is NJ:





Here is Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi:





Here is a magnified view of the Atlanta, Georgia area:




According to these maps, there ARE, in fact, more food deserts in Georgia (and in the south, in general) than in NJ. That might be one theory to explain (1) the difference in obesity rates, and (2) the differences in eating habits, i.e., restaurant dining vs. eating home cooked meals.
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Old 09-10-2011, 11:47 AM
 
13,647 posts, read 16,220,085 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hashford View Post
i did notice that the people of N.j. are healthier looking. here the majority are obese.

In my previous post, I was going to mention the Southern Obesity Factor, but I wanted to be tactful. (Yes, sometimes I am tactful. )

If you give it some thought, the apparent tendency for your neighbors to "eat out" several times each week is likely related to the obesity that is prevalent in your region. And, this is particularly true if the Georgia folk like to patronize "chain" restaurants where quantity almost always substitutes for quality.

As has been said, the southern part of the US is almost always considered to be the least healthy, with much higher rates of Diabetes than the national average. Perhaps your friends and neighbors should try eating at home more often, and concentrate on eating less deep-fried food, in order to control their portions, limit their fat, sodium and sugar intake, lose weight and become healthier.
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Old 09-10-2011, 12:09 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
8,171 posts, read 11,942,725 times
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What's the name of the Chinese buffet in RedBank?
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