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Old 10-04-2007, 11:34 AM
 
Location: NYC & North Jersey
25 posts, read 88,336 times
Reputation: 22

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It would be amazing to see a city like Paterson bounce back... some of the sections in Paterson are full of so much history, and I absolutely love the Eastside Park section where you can get a mansion for under $1Million... in which a similarly sized home would be over $2Million in the towns nearby.

I've also made it a point (with a group of friends, none of us living in Paterson) to start eating at restaurants in the city.... in fact we're going to be trying out a turkish restaurant named Kafe Teria on Main Avenue sometime over the weekend. Theres a bunch of new places popping up all over.
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Old 10-04-2007, 11:51 AM
 
Location: High Bridge, NJ
3,858 posts, read 8,053,871 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by njkate View Post
Hey that's great to read
Now if only they could restore some luster to Asbury park.....sigh.....
There is quite a bit happening in Asbury Park actually, courtesy of one of the groups I mentioned in one of my earlier posts. Asbury Park has become another area in which gay couples have settled due to low rents/prices, historic housing stock, and no worries about school systems. Businesses have been cropping up and homes are being re-habbed. I'm betting the hipsters/artists will be the next crowd. Of course, like anywhere else (*cough* Red Bank *cough*) people will soon begin to scream that the rent is too high, a Starbucks and a Whole Foods will move in, and some folks will long for the grittier days when you could walk out of a Springsteen show at the Stone Pony and step on a crack pipe
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Old 10-04-2007, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Sneads Ferry NC/Randolph NJ/Cape Coral FL
12,928 posts, read 24,057,734 times
Reputation: 10744
Quote:
Originally Posted by Badfish740 View Post
There is quite a bit happening in Asbury Park actually, courtesy of one of the groups I mentioned in one of my earlier posts. Asbury Park has become another area in which gay couples have settled due to low rents/prices, historic housing stock, and no worries about school systems. Businesses have been cropping up and homes are being re-habbed. I'm betting the hipsters/artists will be the next crowd. Of course, like anywhere else (*cough* Red Bank *cough*) people will soon begin to scream that the rent is too high, a Starbucks and a Whole Foods will move in, and some folks will long for the grittier days when you could walk out of a Springsteen show at the Stone Pony and step on a crack pipe
HMMMM..I'll have to research this more..wouldn't be a bad place to retire ..I'd be midway between all the family members Morris County, Ocean County & Mercerville
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Old 10-04-2007, 05:29 PM
 
2,758 posts, read 5,217,738 times
Reputation: 729
Quote:
Originally Posted by njkate View Post
Hey that's great to read
Now if only they could restore some luster to Asbury park.....sigh.....
I was watching on News12 the other night that Hilary Duff was on set in a movie partly taking place in AP
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Old 10-04-2007, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
29,618 posts, read 65,657,734 times
Reputation: 15060
Thanks for yet another fascinating read, BadFish! The best way to spark urban revitalization is to get people talking again about a city and what it can be instead of just "what it is." I know people on the NJ and NY forums are tiring of my incessant promotion of Scranton, PA and Wilkes-Barre, PA, but I'll use them once again to showcase just how a change in the attitude of a city can work wonders!

Several years ago Wilkes-Barre's new mayor, Thomas Leighton, hinted at an upcoming announcement that would be the "biggest in the city's history." The local news media began to speculate, local message boards and radio talk shows heated up, and people at my workplace could do nothing but wonder what the announcement could be. Were the Olympics coming to Wilkes-Barre? Was Wilkes-Barre landing a Hard Rock Cafe or Planet Hollywood? Were Microsoft or Boeing moving their headquarters here? Was the long-polluted Susquehanna River going to be cleansed and renewed for all to enjoy? The excitement his "hinting" spawned was truly awesome. Eventually he held a press conference to announce that the shroud was being lifted from this enigma. What was revealed? Nothing more but a new city slogan---"I Believe." Leighton, a college-educated business professional, seemed to realize that the largest issue facing the city wasn't urban blight/sprawl, poverty, crime, etc. Rather to revitalize the city, he needed to instill some hope back into it for a better tomorrow. While most locals were initally disappointed by the news, they eventually adopted the slogan by buying pins, bumper stickers, signs for their business windows, etc. People were less apt to slam the city into the ground, and Leighton succeeded in restoring civic pride within the hearts and minds of his constituency. The end results? The city's downtown has been bouncing back robustly over the past 2-4 years with new Victorian-era streetlights, a downtown Barnes & Noble/Starbuck's complex, four upcoming mixed-use residential/retail projects, an upcoming law school, an upcoming intermodal transportation center, a new movie theater, new restaurants, etc. Wilkes-Barre's future outlook has improved greatly simply with a little attitude adjustment.

Scranton's current mayor, Chris Doherty, likewise managed to turn Scranton from being dubbed runner-up for "Armpit of America" in the 1990s to being hailed as "hip" and "trendy" by several magazines over the span of just a decade. The city which used to house blight, drug activity, and prostitution as recently as the early-1990s is largely restoring itself through Doherty's "Restoring the Pride" civic pride campaign. Values of single-family homes in the city limits have appreciated by 1/3 since 2003. The city is landing a new downtown medical school in 2009. Speaking of the downtown, this part of the city has really revitalized itself with new boutiques, restaurants, art galleries, and upcoming residential projects.

People (rational ones at least), no longer make jokes about Scranton or Wilkes-Barre since the mayors of each city aggressively took the "gloom-and-doom" crowds to task by countering them with their much more popular "Restoring the Pride" and "I Believe" campaigns, respectively. I often wonder why the mayors of cities in NJ don't start off doing the same. Why can't the mayor of Paterson, for example, initiate a new promotional campaign for the city (perhaps "Paterson Proud" or "Paterson Pride") in order to get the ball rolling on revitalization? You can't reshape a city without first reshaping its image.

Perhaps the mayors in NJ can take a lesson or two from the mayors of Scrnton and Wilkes-Barre (and Bethlehem, PA for that matter as well).
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Old 10-04-2007, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Weehawken, NJ
2,179 posts, read 5,980,337 times
Reputation: 1150
Paul, there is no such thing as civic pride in Paterson, East Orange, Irvington, Passaic, Jersey City (Greenville & Bergen Lafayette sections), Camden, and most of Trenton. These areas can't and shouldn't be compared to your town. If you were going to compare Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, you need to be looking at Hoboken circa 1985, Englewood and Bayonne circa 1998 as well.

The Paterson's and Irvington's of New Jersey are pretty much too far gone. From what I was told by people who grew up during that time, the race riots were the nail in the coffin for these places. Scranton never had race riots, and there was never a huge white flight out of there (there was and is a steady trickling at best).

You have to understand, Paul, that the issues facing these cities is much deeper than what an outsider sees. Take a drive through Passaic (for example) and what do you see? You see a sanctuary city. A haven for illegals and drug dealers, a city where the bad citizens outnumber the good citizens 100-1. A city that lost its industrial might and identity. A city where investors bought several blocks of buildings at a time and sectioned 8 the whole place. A sad city. A city with beautiful architecture situated on the lazy Passaic river that can only be appreciated from the Main Street or from the safety of ones car because it's such a cesspool.

Now, take a look at Hoboken and Englewood. I can remember coming to these two places when I was a little boy and it was bad, BUT the cities still had enough of a native population to where things started to change for the better (more so Hoboken due to the proximity of Manhattan). Englewood today is still a little dicey, but the downtown is pretty, and sidewalk cafes have popped up all over the place. There is still work needed to be done though. So you see, your area should be considered with the Hoboken's, Englewood's, and Bayonne's of the Garden State. A few snazzy lights, a bookstore, and a slogan are the least of the concerns for Paterson, Irvington, East Orange, Camden, Newark, and Trenton.

I'm not trying to be mean spirited but have you ever spent any considerable stretch of time in these places, or New Jersey for that matter? I am going to bet you haven't because even your rosiest of rose colored glasses can't save these places until at least another 15-20 or so years, and even that's a stretch.

Scranton and Wilkes-Barre aren't total slums like these places are and the fighting chance is starting to pay off somewhat, and whomever called Scranton "trendy" needs to go seek professional help, and seek it now. One of my best friends opened a shoe store on Spruce Street and after driving around, I'd say MAYBE 4 or so blocks can be considered trendy, but to classify the whole city as trendy is obscene and a flat out lie. If this is the case, I am going to start calling Nutley and Linden trendy.

Trendy, (which is a stupid classification to begin with) should be used for such places as New Hope, Manayunk, Hoboken, Edgewater, etc...
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Old 10-04-2007, 08:38 PM
 
Location: High Bridge, NJ
3,858 posts, read 8,053,871 times
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While I do agree somewhat with Hobokenguy's assertion that New Jersey's cities are different than Scranton, I don't share his fatalism. Leadership is key. A fish starts to rot at the head, and the heads of many of the cities he mentioned stink pretty badly. Newark has a new Mayor that has it's best interests at heart, but as I said, he's quickly learning that its not easy to reverse so many years of corruption and decay. However, it is just plain wrong to say that NOTHING can ever change.
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Old 10-04-2007, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Weehawken, NJ
2,179 posts, read 5,980,337 times
Reputation: 1150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Badfish740 View Post
While I do agree somewhat with Hobokenguy's assertion that New Jersey's cities are different than Scranton, I don't share his fatalism. Leadership is key. A fish starts to rot at the head, and the heads of many of the cities he mentioned stink pretty badly. Newark has a new Mayor that has it's best interests at heart, but as I said, he's quickly learning that its not easy to reverse so many years of corruption and decay. However, it is just plain wrong to say that NOTHING can ever change.
Leadership is key, correct, but I am talking civic pride here, which none of the mentioned cities have, and the Cory Bookers of the world are too few and far between.
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Old 10-04-2007, 09:13 PM
 
562 posts, read 2,374,064 times
Reputation: 142
I agree.. I too have taken it upon myself to stay local instead of going out to the city (which i normally do).. i was amazed of how many nice lounges are in Elizabeth and the people are not what I thought they'll be like, many well educated and professional individuals.. ie. Destino's lounge, Dolce, Kafe, Bar9, Luna, Blue sky, etc.. I guess we need to get more involved in our communities.. oh and when it comes to restaurants IMO Elizabeth hosts the most diverse restaurants..

I'm currently building a $650K 2 family house in Elizabeth (elmora) anywhere else this would be almost impossible.. keep in mind that Elizabeth is only 14 miles away from NYC

you can see some of the projects that are going on and some that were completed from the Master Plan which is available in the Elizabethnj.org site

http://elizabethnj.org/planning_pdf/master_plan.pdf (broken link)



Quote:
Originally Posted by mtny View Post
It would be amazing to see a city like Paterson bounce back... some of the sections in Paterson are full of so much history, and I absolutely love the Eastside Park section where you can get a mansion for under $1Million... in which a similarly sized home would be over $2Million in the towns nearby.

I've also made it a point (with a group of friends, none of us living in Paterson) to start eating at restaurants in the city.... in fact we're going to be trying out a turkish restaurant named Kafe Teria on Main Avenue sometime over the weekend. Theres a bunch of new places popping up all over.
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Old 10-05-2007, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Sneads Ferry NC/Randolph NJ/Cape Coral FL
12,928 posts, read 24,057,734 times
Reputation: 10744
Quote:
Originally Posted by HobokenGuy View Post
Leadership is key, correct, but I am talking civic pride here, which none of the mentioned cities have, and the Cory Bookers of the world are too few and far between.

see I don't entirely trust Cory Booker..in many many ways he reminds me of a young Ray Nagin of New Orleans....hope my gut instinct is wrong...
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