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Old 08-23-2012, 04:21 AM
 
Location: Arizona
2,278 posts, read 1,566,483 times
Reputation: 2879
I was born and raised in North Jersey ("paddison")...my wife is from the Wyoming Valley (that's in PA) but we currently live in Arizona (although as I'm typing this I'm actually in Carlstadt).

Since this entertaining thread has a focus on how we talk ("tawk" to me, "tock" to my wife), I thought I'd chip in....

In NJ we wahk our dawg. My wife would wok her dahg.
In NJ we like to eat chalk-lat. My wife eats chock-lit.
In NJ we drink waww-ter. My wife drinks wadder.
In NJ we have a rewf on our house. My wife would have a ruff.
We live next to a desert. The large circling birds we see are called hawks in NJ, but apparently in PA they are hocks.
Subway is called Subway because they sell subs. Except to my wife. They sell her hoagies. I think I'll start calling the place Hoagway.

And in Arizona, highways cannot just be numbers (just like in CA). Using the western method in NJ:

The major east-west roads through North Jersey would be called I-80 and I-78 (as opposed to just "80" or "78").
The state highways would be:
"The 4" (Bergen County)
"The 23" (Wayne, Pompton Lakes, W Milford, etc)
You get the idea. And yet Carefree Highway isn't called "The Carefree Highway". So I guess the Parkway and the Turnpike in AZspeak would just be "Parkway" and "Turnpike"? Go figure. That means directions from Newark Airport to where I am now would go like this:

"So you take I-78 to Turnpike, then take Turnpike to the 17, then take the 17 to the 120...."

I'm not sure if "1 and 9" would be "The 1 and 9" or "The 1 and The 9", but I think the latter (or is that "ladder"?) sounds catchy!

Last edited by johnp292; 08-23-2012 at 04:38 AM..
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Old 08-23-2012, 05:35 AM
 
27,434 posts, read 20,815,324 times
Reputation: 24818
Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Yep, it's never "New Ark, NJ" nor "Nooerk, DE", no matter where you're from. (and if you are pronouncing the Delaware town that way, cut it out :-) )


I guess you missed the sarcasm in my "really". I have lived in NJ for all of my 54 years. I certainly know the difference between Newark, NJ, and Newark,DE!!!!!
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Old 08-23-2012, 05:45 AM
 
27,434 posts, read 20,815,324 times
Reputation: 24818
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnp292 View Post
I was born and raised in North Jersey ("paddison")...my wife is from the Wyoming Valley (that's in PA) but we currently live in Arizona (although as I'm typing this I'm actually in Carlstadt).

Since this entertaining thread has a focus on how we talk ("tawk" to me, "tock" to my wife), I thought I'd chip in....

In NJ we wahk our dawg. My wife would wok her dahg.
In NJ we like to eat chalk-lat. My wife eats chock-lit.
In NJ we drink waww-ter. My wife drinks wadder.
In NJ we have a rewf on our house. My wife would have a ruff.
We live next to a desert. The large circling birds we see are called hawks in NJ, but apparently in PA they are hocks.
Subway is called Subway because they sell subs. Except to my wife. They sell her hoagies. I think I'll start calling the place Hoagway.

And in Arizona, highways cannot just be numbers (just like in CA). Using the western method in NJ:

The major east-west roads through North Jersey would be called I-80 and I-78 (as opposed to just "80" or "78").
The state highways would be:
"The 4" (Bergen County)
"The 23" (Wayne, Pompton Lakes, W Milford, etc)
You get the idea. And yet Carefree Highway isn't called "The Carefree Highway". So I guess the Parkway and the Turnpike in AZspeak would just be "Parkway" and "Turnpike"? Go figure. That means directions from Newark Airport to where I am now would go like this:

"So you take I-78 to Turnpike, then take Turnpike to the 17, then take the 17 to the 120...."

I'm not sure if "1 and 9" would be "The 1 and 9" or "The 1 and The 9", but I think the latter (or is that "ladder"?) sounds catchy!
That was pretty funny. But someone on here recently, and I think it was someone in MA, asked a question about "the 287", referring to I-287. Maybe they have different rules in New England!
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Old 08-23-2012, 07:29 AM
 
13,569 posts, read 16,502,121 times
Reputation: 11642
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
YES! People make fun of us all the time for "down the shore", like, "it's called going to the beach a**holes!" but I mean it's simple. Down the shore means going south along the parkway towards the beach towns, and once you're down at the beach exits, you go to the beach. Not that hard, people.

Then you have the people from Philly who try to say "I'm going to the shore this weekend!" No. It's the beach. Only we can say it like that because it makes sense. Otherwise, it's the beach.
People in South Jersey definitely say "down the shore" as in "I'm going down the shore this weekend" or "we were down the shore". So, that is not only a North Jersey thing and I have no idea why it caught on in South Jersey, because people say "down the shore" even if they just drove northeast to go to LBI.

Philly is a little different and they will say "going to the shore" or even "I'm going down to the shore", but rarely just "down the shore".

Quote:
Originally Posted by soug View Post
People have complained for years that WPVI (6ABC) says "down at the shore" instead of just "down the shore." I guess they just want to more grammatically correct.
They say "down at the shore" on the main pages or in the studio broadcasts, but a lot of the on-site reporters do just say "down the shore", I guess it depends on where they are from and how grammatically correct they are trying to be. The studio people seem to use the Philly wording, whereas the on-site reporters use the NJ wording.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
As far as this gravy/sauce debate goes, my dad's parents are both 100% Italian (grandfather's grandparents - I believe it was his grandparents not his parents - came from Naples region; grandmother's parents both came from Marsala, Sicily) and my grandmother calls it both. Sauce or gravy,it almost seems to depend on her mood - just whatever happens to come out of her mouth. Honestly, she says gravy more. My grandfather doesn't cook it so he doesn't say much about it! Haha but I have heard from my grandmother and many others that "gravy" is the Sunday sauce cooked with meats in it while "sauce" is simple tomato sauce. I call it sauce always, my father and grandmother call t both. Maybe it's just personal preference, but it's both in NJ.
We had a thread on this a while back and there were some links posted that seemed to give a reasonable answer on how it came to be. FWIW, many South Jersey Italians, especially in the Washington Twp. (most of whom are from South Philly originally) call it "gravy".

The explanation that I heard offered was similar to what you put up is that "gravy" became "gravy" because it was made with meat or meat drippings, just like English or Irish people would make a brown gravy. When the immigrants were talking with each other and learning English, they simply picked the word that seemed to fit that everyone would understand. Likewise, "sauce" is made without meat or meat drippings like the French would make. In Italy, they're all referred to as "sauces" of which there are infinite varieties. So, it is definitely a uniquely American thing and pretty much contained to this area where you had a lot of mixture between Italian, English and Irish people.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MJJersey View Post
I've never heard anyone refer to Philly as "The City"; Philly is Philly and there is no question what people are talking about when they say "The City".
Philly is usually just Philly, but a lot of people in South Jersey will also specify "Center City" or "Old City" referring to the area they are going to. If someone works in Philly, they are likely to say, "I work in Center City". If people are going out for the night they are likely to say, "We're going to Old City". However, just plain Philly is the universal term. When most people hear "The City" they assume you are talking about New York.
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Old 08-23-2012, 07:35 AM
 
13,569 posts, read 16,502,121 times
Reputation: 11642
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnp292 View Post
I was born and raised in North Jersey ("paddison")...my wife is from the Wyoming Valley (that's in PA) but we currently live in Arizona (although as I'm typing this I'm actually in Carlstadt).
From a South Jersey perspective...

Quote:
Since this entertaining thread has a focus on how we talk ("tawk" to me, "tock" to my wife), I thought I'd chip in....
We tawk.

Quote:
In NJ we wahk our dawg. My wife would wok her dahg.
We wawk our dawgs.

Quote:
In NJ we like to eat chalk-lat. My wife eats chock-lit.
We eat chock-lit.

Quote:
In NJ we drink waww-ter. My wife drinks wadder.
We drink wood-er.

Quote:
In NJ we have a rewf on our house. My wife would have a ruff.
We have a rewf.

Quote:
We live next to a desert. The large circling birds we see are called hawks in NJ, but apparently in PA they are hocks.
We have hawks.

Quote:
Subway is called Subway because they sell subs. Except to my wife. They sell her hoagies. I think I'll start calling the place Hoagway.
We eat hoagies and universally think Subway is crap compared to our local deli's and pizza places.

Quote:
And in Arizona, highways cannot just be numbers (just like in CA). Using the western method in NJ:

The major east-west roads through North Jersey would be called I-80 and I-78 (as opposed to just "80" or "78").
The state highways would be:
"The 4" (Bergen County)
"The 23" (Wayne, Pompton Lakes, W Milford, etc)
You get the idea. And yet Carefree Highway isn't called "The Carefree Highway". So I guess the Parkway and the Turnpike in AZspeak would just be "Parkway" and "Turnpike"? Go figure. That means directions from Newark Airport to where I am now would go like this:

"So you take I-78 to Turnpike, then take Turnpike to the 17, then take the 17 to the 120...."

I'm not sure if "1 and 9" would be "The 1 and 9" or "The 1 and The 9", but I think the latter (or is that "ladder"?) sounds catchy!
Same thing, we drive on: 130, 295, 676, 38, 70, 73, 90, 42, the AC Expressway, the Turnpike and the Parkway.
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Old 08-23-2012, 01:49 PM
 
1,900 posts, read 1,663,132 times
Reputation: 970
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJGOAT View Post
However, just plain Philly is the universal term. When most people hear "The City" they assume you are talking about New York.
Surprised to hear you say this, my experience has been different. I guess it comes down to who you hang out with.
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Old 08-23-2012, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Northern New Jersey
3,369 posts, read 1,772,998 times
Reputation: 2056
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJGOAT View Post
People in South Jersey definitely say "down the shore" as in "I'm going down the shore this weekend" or "we were down the shore". So, that is not only a North Jersey thing and I have no idea why it caught on in South Jersey, because people say "down the shore" even if they just drove northeast to go to LBI.

Philly is a little different and they will say "going to the shore" or even "I'm going down to the shore", but rarely just "down the shore".
It's funny because for North Jerseyans, we're literally going down (well, south. and north is "up north"). So it's odd to me that people who live in south Jersey will say "down the shore" even if they're going to a beach that's technically north of them. I guess it just caught on. For most people in South Jersey, the beach is east then either north or south, while in North Jersey, you're going southeast no matter where you're from. That's where "down" comes from.

It's just a phrase now in NJ I guess that means "going to the beach". This must be why people out of state hate it so much, though, because it's changed from its original meaning and sometimes makes zero sense when some people say it haha.

I only know a few people from Philly but they say "going to the shore". I'm sure that everyone says something a little different, but those I know say "to the shore" and to me it's funny. People in Jersey really don't say that. It's "down the shore" or "to the beach". Interesting how sayings change regionally, especially when referring to the same place.

Also, does anyone know if it's true that 'Benny' means 'Bergen Essex Newark New York'? Someone told me that once, but I always thought Benny was a more universal term for any nonlocal at the beach. Maybe in NJ, that acronym would just fit in well?
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Old 08-23-2012, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Northern New Jersey
3,369 posts, read 1,772,998 times
Reputation: 2056
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnp292 View Post
I was born and raised in North Jersey ("paddison")...my wife is from the Wyoming Valley (that's in PA) but we currently live in Arizona (although as I'm typing this I'm actually in Carlstadt).

Since this entertaining thread has a focus on how we talk ("tawk" to me, "tock" to my wife), I thought I'd chip in....

In NJ we wahk our dawg. My wife would wok her dahg.
In NJ we like to eat chalk-lat. My wife eats chock-lit.
In NJ we drink waww-ter. My wife drinks wadder.
In NJ we have a rewf on our house. My wife would have a ruff.
We live next to a desert. The large circling birds we see are called hawks in NJ, but apparently in PA they are hocks.
Subway is called Subway because they sell subs. Except to my wife. They sell her hoagies. I think I'll start calling the place Hoagway.

And in Arizona, highways cannot just be numbers (just like in CA). Using the western method in NJ:

The major east-west roads through North Jersey would be called I-80 and I-78 (as opposed to just "80" or "78").
The state highways would be:
"The 4" (Bergen County)
"The 23" (Wayne, Pompton Lakes, W Milford, etc)
You get the idea. And yet Carefree Highway isn't called "The Carefree Highway". So I guess the Parkway and the Turnpike in AZspeak would just be "Parkway" and "Turnpike"? Go figure. That means directions from Newark Airport to where I am now would go like this:

"So you take I-78 to Turnpike, then take Turnpike to the 17, then take the 17 to the 120...."

I'm not sure if "1 and 9" would be "The 1 and 9" or "The 1 and The 9", but I think the latter (or is that "ladder"?) sounds catchy!
I say tawk (talk), wawk (walk), wawter (water), sub (not hoagie, ew), chawclit (chocolate), rewf (roof), dawg (dog), and hawk (obviously hawk). Oh, and cawfee (coffee). Actually, I am in Maine right now with family from elsewhere in New England for a little reunion and a distant cousin laughed when I said coffee the Jersey way. She literally laughed at me then mimicked the way I said it.

For highways, I call it "the Turnpike", "the Parkway". Route 22 would just be "22", same with other numbers. 1 and 9 is just that, no "the" in front of it.

And back to subs, I've never understood the word hoagie. Subway is named Subway because they're called subs, and we get made fun of for calling them subs not hoagies? Hoagway made me laugh!
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Old 08-23-2012, 03:22 PM
 
13,569 posts, read 16,502,121 times
Reputation: 11642
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
And back to subs, I've never understood the word hoagie. Subway is named Subway because they're called subs, and we get made fun of for calling them subs not hoagies? Hoagway made me laugh!
It's just a regional thing. For instance, "hero" is the most common term used in NYC. Sub is definitely the most widespread term and nationally recognized, but there are a ton of different variations and names for that kind of sandwich. In Boston some people call them "spuckies" up in Maine they mainly call it "Italian Sandwich" (they're apparently not very inventive, lol). In some parts of New England they call them "grinders", but in Boston a "grinder" refers to a "toasted spuckie" or in Philly a "grinder" refers to a "toasted hoagie".

There are a few theories out there on where "hoagie" came from. The two most predominant ones:

During WW1 workers at the Hog Island Shipyard were working insane hours so they would bring sandwiches with various meats, cheeses, lettuce, tomato, etc. with them. The sandwiches became known as "Hog Islands" which got shortened to "hoggies" which ended up as "hoagies".

The other explanation offered was that among the Italian community in South Philly someone who was destitute was refered to as "on the hoke". Deli owners would give out scraps of cheese and meat on an Italian roll to poor people. The sandwiches were called "hokies" which a lot of people pronounced "hoagies".

As for Subway, I wouldn't use them as any resource on what these kinds of sandwiches should be called or what they should taste like.
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Old 08-23-2012, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Arizona
2,278 posts, read 1,566,483 times
Reputation: 2879
I forgot aout cawfee. My wife would drink kahfee if she liked it. Which reminds me that if Im sick I might kawf, but she would kahf.

I agree with everyone else about eating in Subway, but maybe there is a difference between a sub and a hoagie since my wife loves the place.

And right now I'm sitting in New-erk airport waiting for my plane back to Phoenix.
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