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Old 10-08-2007, 04:47 PM
 
Location: NJ/NY
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St Barnabas is known for it's labor and delivery care. It handles more deliveries than anywhere in NJ. Heck, at 7000 per year, they deliver more babys than almost anywhere in the country. Anthony Quartell practices there and is one of the best OB/Gyn's in the state. He may be pricy though.

Dave Principe is excellent too. He is one of the few who still specializes in high risk deliveries, so if things were to go wrong, he would be a great guy to have around. He practices out of St. Joes in Paterson, not St Barnabas, but his cost would probably be lower than Dr Quartell.
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Old 10-08-2007, 07:20 PM
 
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thanks a lot for your kind notes and info.
From the aquaintance, I heard that Hackensack is one of the best in NJ, however, w/o insurance, it would cost appx. USD 50,000-60,000....therefore, I just want to research other similar level of hospitals such as PVH, Englewood, etc....
but great to know St. Peters and again Hackensack..... let me contact these 2 hospitals you recommended. and really appreciate your warm messages.

If you have any more info regarding hospitals, pls feel free to share with me!!!

Thanks

Sky
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Old 10-08-2007, 07:26 PM
 
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thanks a lot, I'll also contact S. Barnabas, btw, can you pls tell me how far it is from Edgwater, Bergen county? My place is just next to George Washington Bridge. thanks, Sky
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Old 10-08-2007, 08:59 PM
 
Location: NJ/NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sky0826 View Post
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thanks a lot, I'll also contact S. Barnabas, btw, can you pls tell me how far it is from Edgwater, Bergen county? My place is just next to George Washington Bridge. thanks, Sky
It's 1/2 hour from Edgewater with no traffic. Good luck.
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Old 10-08-2007, 10:04 PM
 
67 posts, read 291,381 times
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Default best hospitals in your area are...

I would choose either St. Joseph's in Paterson (like other posters have mentioned) or New York Presbyterian (right over the GWB). At St. Joseph's, Dr. Christopher Sullivan is fabulous (he is a perinatologist--specializes in high risk pregnancies--but he also oversees non-highrisk, too). At New York Presbyterian, Dr. Todd Rosen is wonderful (he's also a perinatologist, but he, too, oversees non-highrisk). St. Joseph's and New York Pres. are the only hospitals with Level 4 (the highest/best) neonatal units in the NY/NJ metro area. Other hospitals transport newborns to those two facilities when babies are "high risk" after birth. In my opinion, you can't go wrong with either of those hospitals, and the commute from Edgewater is definitely doable.
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Old 10-08-2007, 10:06 PM
 
Location: NJ
2,212 posts, read 6,172,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sky0826 View Post
thanks a lot for your kind notes and info.
From the aquaintance, I heard that Hackensack is one of the best in NJ, however, w/o insurance, it would cost appx. USD 50,000-60,000....Sky
What an obscene amount of money.
When my kids were born the bills the insurance company recieved were:
OB/GYN -$4,000
Hospital, including anaestesiologist for epidural _$12,000 total.

I know that the insurance companies negotiate like hell and get special rates, but if they can do it for them......

That was for St. Peters with private rooms and all the bells and whistles so maybe that will give you a ballpark figure of what it SHOULD cost.
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Old 10-10-2007, 03:39 PM
 
Location: NJ/NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by springcheer View Post
I would choose either St. Joseph's in Paterson (like other posters have mentioned) or New York Presbyterian (right over the GWB). At St. Joseph's, Dr. Christopher Sullivan is fabulous (he is a perinatologist--specializes in high risk pregnancies--but he also oversees non-highrisk, too). At New York Presbyterian, Dr. Todd Rosen is wonderful (he's also a perinatologist, but he, too, oversees non-highrisk). St. Joseph's and New York Pres. are the only hospitals with Level 4 (the highest/best) neonatal units in the NY/NJ metro area. Other hospitals transport newborns to those two facilities when babies are "high risk" after birth. In my opinion, you can't go wrong with either of those hospitals, and the commute from Edgewater is definitely doable.
With all due respect 99.99% of babys are born in hospitals without Level 4 neonatal units. They are only necessary for the sickest of the sick. Neonatal units in other large hospitals are fine for most babies, even 24 week old premies. I dont think this should be a deciding factor in where to have a baby unless you know there are already major problems in utero.

That being said, I think St Joe's is a great place to deliver, and has great doctors. This should be the reason to choose the hospital.
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Old 10-10-2007, 07:02 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
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Default In my experience

Quote:
Originally Posted by eskmd View Post
With all due respect 99.99% of babys are born in hospitals without Level 4 neonatal units. They are only necessary for the sickest of the sick. Neonatal units in other large hospitals are fine for most babies, even 24 week old premies. I dont think this should be a deciding factor in where to have a baby unless you know there are already major problems in utero.

That being said, I think St Joe's is a great place to deliver, and has great doctors. This should be the reason to choose the hospital.
Our baby was born in a Level 4 Neonatal hospital. Normal healthy Mother & baby & normal birth, except for the unexpected cord being wrapped around baby's neck twice. Baby had to be intibated (sp?) We were told by Doctors that if baby was intibated for more than 12 hours (I admit, I am not exactly positive on the amount of hours) That our baby would have to be transported to a LEVEL 4 Neonatal unit. By the grace of God, our baby had the breathing tube removed in 6 hours and we were already at a LEVEL 4 Neonatal unit, should we need them. We were not the "sickest of sick" and had no "in utero" problems. We did see other babies in the Neonatal unit that would just break your heart.
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Old 10-11-2007, 04:57 AM
 
Location: NJ/NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewHomeHappy View Post
Our baby was born in a Level 4 Neonatal hospital. Normal healthy Mother & baby & normal birth, except for the unexpected cord being wrapped around baby's neck twice. Baby had to be intibated (sp?) We were told by Doctors that if baby was intibated for more than 12 hours (I admit, I am not exactly positive on the amount of hours) That our baby would have to be transported to a LEVEL 4 Neonatal unit. By the grace of God, our baby had the breathing tube removed in 6 hours and we were already at a LEVEL 4 Neonatal unit, should we need them. We were not the "sickest of sick" and had no "in utero" problems. We did see other babies in the Neonatal unit that would just break your heart.
First of all, I'm glad your baby turned out OK.
Having the cord wrapped around the neck is a very common experience, but USUALLY causes no harm. I'm sorry it did in your case. But as someone who intubates neonates, I can honestly say that babys in situations like the one you described do fine in hospitals that don't have that level 4 distinction. In fact, leve 4s are/were rare enough that MOST of these situations occur at non level 4 hospitals with good outcomes.

The old thinking was that when an infant is intubated longer than 24 hours that they be transferred to a level 4 NICU. Then people realized that there were plenty of level 3 NICUs that have the capability to handle this sort of situation, and it was a huge waste of health care dollars to do things this way, so they changed the classification system. There technically is no longer a level 4, although the previous level 4 units are trying to hold onto that distinction with their last breath. The new classification system is level I, II, IIA, IIB, III, IIIA, IIIB. All level III NICUs can keep a newborn mechanically ventilated for longer than 24 hours.

But I really got far off point. My point was simply that ALL babies cant be born at the (formerly) level 4 NICUs. They would be completely overwhelmed in the first 10 minutes. When deciding where to deliver, the patients Doctor and where the patient feels most comfortable should be the first part of the decision making process. Then, if problems arise during the pregnancy, the plan should be altered accordingly. As I said, St Barnabas delivers more babys than %95 of hospitals in the whole country. Women also love delivering at Valley Hospital. Neither of these were level 4, but that shouldn't stop anyone from delivering there.
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Old 11-08-2007, 09:15 PM
NJT
 
11 posts, read 74,807 times
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Default Hi

I know this is going a little off-topic of the OP, but
It has been my experience that that Level III Nicu's mainly transport out children for complicated cardiac (b.c. they need to be placed on a machine called ECMO) or surgical issues.

Some babies who are sick may be sent out also to be evaluated by "newer" eyes.

t.
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