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Old 11-16-2012, 11:04 AM
 
286 posts, read 309,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retriever View Post
Well, the issue has finally been resolved, and Kean has now received its 10 year accreditation from The Middle States Commission on Higher Education. For the full story, take a look at this article from today's Star-Ledger:

Kean University re-accredited for 10 years after lengthy battle | NJ.com


While the article is well-written overall, it is just unfortunate that the author--like so many young people today--does not know the difference between the words, "lead", and "led". That particular gaffe can be found in the first sentence of the 6th paragraph of the story.
Thanks for the article! While they have taken care of the accreditation issues, I believe their reputation is tarnished due to this whole mess. Quite a few of my classmates have voiced their concern regarding Kean and their integrity. I do not see this as a reason to celebrate.

I find it mind-boggling that a person writing for the Star Ledger, who must have obviously majored in English or Journalism or the like, cannot tell the difference between "lead" and "led"! Unbelievable. There is also "there" and "their" and "they're"(!), "wait" and "weight", "lose" and loose", which, by the way, is one of my favorites! My brain explodes a little every time I read the sentence "I am trying to loose weight".

Another oldie but goodie is the sentence "I borrowed him some money."

The list goes on and on, as I'm sure you know!
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Old 11-16-2012, 11:43 AM
 
11,758 posts, read 13,666,984 times
Reputation: 15644
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishMajor1983 View Post
I find it mind-boggling that a person writing for the Star Ledger, who must have obviously majored in English or Journalism or the like, cannot tell the difference between "lead" and "led"! Unbelievable. There is also "there" and "their" and "they're"(!), "wait" and "weight", "lose" and loose", which, by the way, is one of my favorites! My brain explodes a little every time I read the sentence "I am trying to loose weight".

Another oldie but goodie is the sentence "I borrowed him some money."

The list goes on and on, as I'm sure you know!

Yes, and perhaps at the top of that list is the non-word, "alot".
For reasons that I cannot fathom, a huge percentage of the population (including a lot of members of this forum) now seems to think that the two words, "a lot", have morphed into one non-word, "alot".

As to, "I borrowed him some money", my observation is that this type of gaffe is seen mostly in the southern states, and perhaps in the Midwestern US.
Down south, I think that the preferred pronunication is..."I borried him some money", thus enabling them to slaughter the language in two different ways!

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Old 11-16-2012, 04:20 PM
 
Location: NJ
328 posts, read 829,838 times
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I was just coming back here to post that Kean's homepage has info on their accreditation. However, I agree with your concerns. There are plenty of other universities in NJ! I am only going to Kean because they bring the courses to my local community college which makes them easily accessible for me.

I have to wonder about the Star Ledger ever since they endorsed Obama by proclaiming him a centrist. I don't care who they endorse but to call Obama a centrist? LOL!!! (FTR, I'd say the same about Romney)
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Old 11-16-2012, 04:23 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Garden State
2,678 posts, read 2,949,733 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retriever View Post
Well, the issue has finally been resolved, and Kean has now received its 10 year accreditation from The Middle States Commission on Higher Education. For the full story, take a look at this article from today's Star-Ledger:

Kean University re-accredited for 10 years after lengthy battle | NJ.com


While the article is well-written overall, it is just unfortunate that the author--like so many young people today--does not know the difference between the words, "lead", and "led". That particular gaffe can be found in the first sentence of the 6th paragraph of the story.
Are you "heathrow" by any chance?

The first comment after the article is very interesting, too.
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Old 11-16-2012, 09:02 PM
 
3,799 posts, read 8,060,494 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retriever View Post
Yes, and perhaps at the top of that list is the non-word, "alot".
For reasons that I cannot fathom, a huge percentage of the population (including a lot of members of this forum) now seems to think that the two words, "a lot", have morphed into one non-word, "alot".
When I was a kid my teacher brought in print outs of the phrase "a lot" in large letters and then had all the students rip the paper in half to show that it is two separate words. I still remember that 20 years later, so I guess it worked
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Old 11-17-2012, 05:22 AM
 
11,758 posts, read 13,666,984 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GiantRutgersfan View Post
When I was a kid my teacher brought in print outs of the phrase "a lot" in large letters and then had all the students rip the paper in half to show that it is two separate words. I still remember that 20 years later, so I guess it worked

Your teacher utilized a very innovative and (obviously) memorable teaching strategy.
I wish that I had thought of this approach several years ago, when I was attempting to help some younger co-workers with their writing!

In that job, I had to review reports written by co-workers, and incorporate their information into legal documents that I was drafting. Having to wade through poorly-written and sometimes barely-literate reports made my job all the more stressful, as I had court-driven deadlines to meet. It was particularly stressful when these young folks would make reference to a medical condition from which one of our clients was suffering, simply because--more often than not--they would slaughter the spelling of that condition/disease.

I can recall spending a considerable amount of time with my medical dictionary, attempting to figure out what, "Lyloris Penosis", was. Finally, I figured out that this client had actually been diagnosed with Pyloric Stenosis! I must have wasted at least 40 minutes with that mistake.

As you can imagine, many of these younger people had particular trouble with distinguishing between you're/your, there/they're/their, lose/loose, wait/weight, and led/lead, but the one mistake that seemed to be universal was my particular bugaboo, namely the non-word, "alot". In order to try to help them remember that, "a lot", consisted of two words, I would remind them (in a jocular manner) that since, "a little", consisted of two words, then it was only logical that, "a lot", was also two words.

That strategy seemed to work for a few weeks, until I noticed that one of the young women had begun to use a new non-word, namely, "alittle"!
Apparently, she had some dim recollection that I had said something about, "a little", but she got the details backwards.

At that point, in view of the reality that I was planning on leaving the job within a few months, I decided to just give up on my attempts to improve literacy in that office.

Last edited by Retriever; 11-17-2012 at 05:47 AM..
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Old 11-17-2012, 06:32 AM
 
43,401 posts, read 43,295,296 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishMajor1983 View Post
Thanks for the article! While they have taken care of the accreditation issues, I believe their reputation is tarnished due to this whole mess. Quite a few of my classmates have voiced their concern regarding Kean and their integrity. I do not see this as a reason to celebrate.

I find it mind-boggling that a person writing for the Star Ledger, who must have obviously majored in English or Journalism or the like, cannot tell the difference between "lead" and "led"! Unbelievable. There is also "there" and "their" and "they're"(!), "wait" and "weight", "lose" and loose", which, by the way, is one of my favorites! My brain explodes a little every time I read the sentence "I am trying to loose weight".

Another oldie but goodie is the sentence "I borrowed him some money."

The list goes on and on, as I'm sure you know!
If you really want your head to explode, or if you just need some entertainment, go to the Writing forum here on C-D. We have an ongoing thread called "I can't take it anymore" where we voice our frustration at some of those things. The "lose/loose" "advice/advise" issues are common, but wait until you get to the ones like "She is a pre-Madonna" or "The Nazi swats sticker symbol".
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Old 11-17-2012, 06:58 AM
 
11,758 posts, read 13,666,984 times
Reputation: 15644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
If you really want your head to explode, or if you just need some entertainment, go to the Writing forum here on C-D. We have an ongoing thread called "I can't take it anymore" where we voice our frustration at some of those things. The "lose/loose" "advice/advise" issues are common, but wait until you get to the ones like "She is a pre-Madonna" or "The Nazi swats sticker symbol".

I haven't yet taken a look at the Writing Forum, but I suppose that I should...at the risk of possibly having my head explode.
In the meantime, here are three more of the shockingly-common writing problems that I notice nowadays:

Confusing the two words, "due", and "do"
Using the non-word, "supposably", in place of, "supposedly"
Using the non-word, "prolly", in place of, "probably"

And, from my days of wading through those barely-literate reports from younger co-workers, this one is a classic.
One young woman repeatedly used the phrase, "For all intensive purposes", instead of, "For all intents and purposes".
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Old 11-17-2012, 07:56 AM
 
43,401 posts, read 43,295,296 times
Reputation: 45795
Quote:
Originally Posted by Retriever View Post
I haven't yet taken a look at the Writing Forum, but I suppose that I should...at the risk of possibly having my head explode.
In the meantime, here are three more of the shockingly-common writing problems that I notice nowadays:

Confusing the two words, "due", and "do"
Using the non-word, "supposably", in place of, "supposedly"
Using the non-word, "prolly", in place of, "probably"

And, from my days of wading through those barely-literate reports from younger co-workers, this one is a classic.
One young woman repeatedly used the phrase, "For all intensive purposes", instead of, "For all intents and purposes".
We've already covered that one. There's also "a doggy-dog world". I'm telling you, Retriever, you'd enjoy the thread. Hours of entertainment, and a place to go with your frustrations when you're told not to worry, "it's only an Internet forum".

I can't take it anymore.
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Old 11-18-2012, 09:31 AM
 
Location: The beautiful Garden State
2,678 posts, read 2,949,733 times
Reputation: 3486
I recently received a letter from the new director of my mother's nursing home (in New Jersey), where he wanted to "formerly" introduce himself as the new director of the facility.

I guess I better go back to the writing forum and post this!
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