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Old 08-21-2015, 08:44 AM
 
Location: New Jersey/Florida
5,037 posts, read 9,066,447 times
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This quote was asked to me. ( but offer nothing to improve it )


Why do I or anyone else have to "Offer" something to improve Newark. Billions have been given to Newark by (US) the taxpayers, through Abbott District funding, UEZ grants, State Aid, millions in tax relief given to businesses that were already in Jersey to relocate there and so forth. How about the people that live there do something instead of 5 killings in less then 48 hours.
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Old 08-21-2015, 08:51 AM
 
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Reported crimes are down:

http://newarkpdonline.org/CrimeStats...t/08162015.pdf
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Old 08-21-2015, 08:55 AM
 
421 posts, read 329,307 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JERSEY MAN View Post
This quote was asked to me. ( but offer nothing to improve it )


Why do I or anyone else have to "Offer" something to improve Newark. Billions have been given to Newark by (US) the taxpayers, through Abbott District funding, UEZ grants, State Aid, millions in tax relief given to businesses that were already in Jersey to relocate there and so forth. How about the people that live there do something instead of 5 killings in less then 48 hours.
I am a resident and I do my part. I own two, two family homes. Live in one rent out the other units. I take care of my property and get involved in the community. There are plenty of good residents living here.


OK - take back all the tax gifts Newark gets. Can we build some affordable housing projects by your house? You don't think the state screwed Newark by dropping the most housing projects here? Why not build a nice housing project in Livingston or Millburn?
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Old 08-21-2015, 09:03 AM
 
Location: New Jersey/Florida
5,037 posts, read 9,066,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdacunha View Post
I am a resident and I do my part. I own two, two family homes. Live in one rent out the other units. I take care of my property and get involved in the community. There are plenty of good residents living here.


OK - take back all the tax gifts Newark gets. Can we build some affordable housing projects by your house? You don't think the state screwed Newark by dropping the most housing projects here? Why not build a nice housing project in Livingston or Millburn?
So you're an investor looking to pump up Newarks image, I don't blame you for that. And yes, our town has affordable housing(Mt. Laurel decision) that was forced down our throats by the state by the "Do Gooders".
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Old 08-21-2015, 09:16 AM
 
Location: New Jersey/Florida
5,037 posts, read 9,066,447 times
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Short history lesson on why Newark is the pits.

The city made serious mistakes with public housing and urban renewal, although these were not the sole causes of Newark's tragedy. Across several administrations, the city leaders of Newark considered the federal government's offer to pay for 100% of the costs of housing projects as a blessing. The decline in industrial jobs meant that more poor people needed housing, whereas in prewar years, public housing was for working-class families. While other cities were skeptical about putting so many poor families together and were cautious in building housing projects, Newark pursued federal funds. Eventually, Newark had a higher percentage of its residents in public housing than any other American city.
The largely Italian-American First Ward was one of the hardest hit by urban renewal. A 46 acre (19 hectare) housing tract, labeled a slum because it had dense older housing, was torn down for multi-story, multi-racial Le Corbusier-style high rises, named the Christopher Columbus Homes. The tract had contained 8th Avenue, the commercial heart of the neighborhood. Fifteen small-scale blocks were combined into three "superblocks". The Columbus Homes, never in harmony with the rest of the neighborhood, were vacated in the 1980s. They were finally torn down in 1994.[SIZE=2][22][/SIZE]
From 1950 to 1960, while Newark's overall population dropped from 438,000 to 408,000, it gained 65,000 non-whites. By 1966, Newark had a black majority, a faster turnover than most other northern cities had experienced. Evaluating the riots of 1967, Newark educator Nathan Wright, Jr. said, "No typical American city has as yet experienced such a precipitous change from a white to a black majority." The misfortune of the Great Migration and Puerto Rican migration was that Southern blacks and Puerto Ricans were moving to Newark to be industrial workers just as the industrial jobs were decreasing sharply. Many suffered the culture shock of leaving a rural area for an urban industrial job base and environment. The latest migrants to Newark left poverty in the South to find poverty in the North.
During the 1950s alone, Newark's white population decreased by more than 25 percent from 363,000 to 266,000. From 1960 to 1967, its white population fell further to 46,000. Although in-migration of new ethnic groups combined with white flight markedly affected the demographics of Newark, the racial composition of city workers did not change as rapidly. In addition, the political and economic power in the city remained based in the white population.
In 1967, out of a police force of 1,400, only 150 members were black, mostly in subordinate positions. Racial tensions arose because of the disproportion between residents and police demographics. Since Newark's blacks lived in neighborhoods that had been white only two decades earlier, nearly all of their apartments and stores were white-owned as well. The loss of jobs affected overall income in the city, and many owners cut back on maintenance of buildings, contributing to a cycle of deterioration in housing stock.
Without consulting any residents of the neighborhood to be affected, Mayor Addonizio offered to condemn and raze 150 acres (61 hectares) of a densely populated black neighborhood in the central ward for the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ). UMDNJ had wanted to settle in suburban Madison, NJ.
1967 Newark riots[edit]

Main article: 1967 Newark riots
On July 12, 1967, a taxi driver named John Smith was injured while violently resisting arrest. A crowd gathered outside the police station where Smith was detained. Due to miscommunication, the crowd believed Smith had died in custody, although he had been transported to a hospital via a back entrance to the station. This sparked scuffles between African Americans and police in the Fourth Ward, although the damage toll was only $2,500.
Subsequent to television news broadcasts on July 13 however, new and larger riots took place. Twenty-six people were killed; 1,500 wounded; 1,600 arrested; and $10 million in property was destroyed. More than a thousand businesses were torched or looted, including 167 groceries (most of which would never reopen). Newark's reputation suffered dramatically. It was said, "wherever American cities are going, Newark will get there first."[SIZE=2][23][/SIZE]
The long and short term causes of the riots are explored in depth in the documentary film Revolution '67.
After the riots[edit]


Semi-abandoned buildings in the riot area, mid-1990s


The 1970s and 1980s brought continued decline. The middle class of all races continued to leave the city. Certain pockets of the city developed as domains of poverty and social isolation. Some say that whenever the media of New York needed to find some example of urban despair, they traveled to Newark.
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Old 08-21-2015, 09:31 AM
 
421 posts, read 329,307 times
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I know what happened 40-50 years ago. How are we going to get out of that? Development and gentrification. The good people that are here can stay the bad will leave.

Newark have too much going for it with it's location and transportation access. Crap happened in the past, let's look towards the future.
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Old 08-21-2015, 09:43 AM
 
Location: New Jersey/Florida
5,037 posts, read 9,066,447 times
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Default The good people that are here can stay the bad will leave

And tell me exactly where are they going to move to. The article I posted said Newark had/has the most projects per capita in the country. When you have thousands of apartments and numerous projects that offer Section 8 or free housing, welfare for life and so on the less fortunate tend to congregate. It also attracts criminals and drug dealing entrepreneurs. And before I'm labeled RACIST there are many fine people living there also.
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Old 08-21-2015, 10:19 AM
 
421 posts, read 329,307 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JERSEY MAN View Post
And tell me exactly where are they going to move to. The article I posted said Newark had/has the most projects per capita in the country. When you have thousands of apartments and numerous projects that offer Section 8 or free housing, welfare for life and so on the less fortunate tend to congregate. It also attracts criminals and drug dealing entrepreneurs. And before I'm labeled RACIST there are many fine people living there also.

They are developing the downtown where there isn't much population. you build a few mid to high end towers that are priced less than Jersey City and people will move there. I see it when I drive downtown on Friday or Saturday nights. I already see people riding their bikes and walking their dogs. Not a huge amount but, they are there. Newark's downtown has the potential to be a great place with businesses, restaurants, NJPAC, Pru Center and the Ironbound.

It is going to be very very hard to fix the South and West Wards but, we have to start somewhere. Developments that are going up right now are being rented in the $1200-$2500 range, YES they are. I rented out a 3 bedroom apts for $1800-$2000. That's in the Ironbound, but people are coming in. They just want upscale and modern.

We have to improve our housing stock. We need to get rid of slumlord landlords that rent to illegals for $500 a room. Many of those buildings can be renovated and rented out for a much higher figure.

If you have time browse there two forums below for pictures of the developments.


Newark Development - Page 576

Northern New Jersey Development News - Page 46 - SkyscraperCity
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Old 08-21-2015, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Durham NC
1,023 posts, read 901,881 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdacunha View Post
They are developing the downtown where there isn't much population. you build a few mid to high end towers that are priced less than Jersey City and people will move there. I see it when I drive downtown on Friday or Saturday nights. I already see people riding their bikes and walking their dogs. Not a huge amount but, they are there. Newark's downtown has the potential to be a great place with businesses, restaurants, NJPAC, Pru Center and the Ironbound.

It is going to be very very hard to fix the South and West Wards but, we have to start somewhere. Developments that are going up right now are being rented in the $1200-$2500 range, YES they are. I rented out a 3 bedroom apts for $1800-$2000. That's in the Ironbound, but people are coming in. They just want upscale and modern.

We have to improve our housing stock. We need to get rid of slumlord landlords that rent to illegals for $500 a room. Many of those buildings can be renovated and rented out for a much higher figure.

If you have time browse there two forums below for pictures of the developments.


Newark Development - Page 576

Northern New Jersey Development News - Page 46 - SkyscraperCity
They are doing a lot of building in Harrison near Red Bull Arena. I drive around Newark a lot and there are just so many places that look just like they did after the riots. You have an eroding/eroded industrial tax base now which cannot support the real estate tax base. Property taxes are insane in Newark.
The whites that fled the city pre and after the riots are not coming back. The problem is not racial. If you give somebody something for nothing they just don't have any incentive to take care of it. High rise slums aren't the answer but what are you going to do? Build every welfare recipient their own one family house?
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Old 08-21-2015, 11:55 AM
 
421 posts, read 329,307 times
Reputation: 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by lancers View Post
They are doing a lot of building in Harrison near Red Bull Arena. I drive around Newark a lot and there are just so many places that look just like they did after the riots. You have an eroding/eroded industrial tax base now which cannot support the real estate tax base. Property taxes are insane in Newark.
The whites that fled the city pre and after the riots are not coming back. The problem is not racial. If you give somebody something for nothing they just don't have any incentive to take care of it. High rise slums aren't the answer but what are you going to do? Build every welfare recipient their own one family house?
Who is talking about high rise slums? They aren't building high rise slums. Market rate rentals are not slums.
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