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Old 12-27-2018, 06:02 PM
 
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I expect Montclair/South Orange are what most people think of as far as towns with middle to upper-middle class and significant black populations.

However, even in the towns I've seen mentioned they are divided within the town. With a Black Section, or a Hispanic section. And these divisions tend to run along economic lines as well. Not that Montclair doesn't have wealthy black citizens, but the black areas tend not to be as wealthy as the white areas within the town.

As another poster said, peoples' general preference to live with people like them both by race and by socio-economic status leads to these divisions.
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Old 12-28-2018, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Union City, NJ
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Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Would North Bergen count?




I grew up in North Bergen in the 90's and graduated high school in the early 2000's. While there were certainly a large number of Hispanics, we didn't really have many black people at all. Our high school had 2500 students, and I would honestly be surprised if there were 10 black kids. I'm sure that's changed, though.
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Old 12-28-2018, 08:54 AM
 
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Originally Posted by HudsonCoNJ View Post
I grew up in North Bergen in the 90's and graduated high school in the early 2000's. While there were certainly a large number of Hispanics, we didn't really have many black people at all. Our high school had 2500 students, and I would honestly be surprised if there were 10 black kids. I'm sure that's changed, though.
Well like has been said throughout the thread, a lot of people of similar demographics enjoy living among their own demographic. So would North Bergen at least count for the middle class town with a heavy Hispanic presence, minus the black presence? I'm not sure if North Bergen is considered middle class to most.
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Old 12-28-2018, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Union City, NJ
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Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Well like has been said throughout the thread, a lot of people of similar demographics enjoy living among their own demographic. So would North Bergen at least count for the middle class town with a heavy Hispanic presence, minus the black presence? I'm not sure if North Bergen is considered middle class to most.


Middle class is a very broad characterization. It can range from just above poverty level to just below affluent. But yes, I would consider North Bergen middle class. But obviously, a few rungs lower on household income compared to towns like South Orange and Montclair.
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Old 12-28-2018, 09:43 AM
 
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Originally Posted by HudsonCoNJ View Post
Middle class is a very broad characterization. It can range from just above poverty level to just below affluent. But yes, I would consider North Bergen middle class. But obviously, a few rungs lower on household income compared to towns like South Orange and Montclair.
I would consider North Bergen to be more working class than middle class.

The median household income is only $57k, per capita income of $27k and only 26% of residents (over age 25) have a bachelors degree or higher. These stats put it at a lower socioeconomic status than even Hackensack. This is a textbook example of a working class town; which is not a bad thing.

A true solidly middle class town in the NYC suburbs would have a median household income between $80k-$125k, a per capita income of at least $35k and at least 40% of its adult population with a bachelors or above. Examples would be Bergenfield, Hasbrouck Heights, Nutley, Teaneck, Dumont, Rutherford, West Orange.

Some may mention that there are many people out there who make good livings without bachelors degrees (which is true); but we must remember that "class" is not only defined by money but also by education too.

https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/no...ountynewjersey

Last edited by MemoryMaker; 12-28-2018 at 11:12 AM..
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Old 12-28-2018, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Union City, NJ
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Originally Posted by MemoryMaker View Post
I would consider North Bergen to be more working class than middle class.

The median household income is only $57k, per capita income of $27k and only 26% of residents (over age 25) have a bachelors degree or higher. These stats put it at a lower socioeconomic status than even Hackensack. This is a textbook example of a working class town; which is not a bad thing.

A true solidly middle class town in the NYC suburbs would have a median household income between $80k-$125k, a per capita income of at least $35k and at least 40% of its adult population with a bachelors or above. Examples would be Bergenfield, Hasbrouck Heights, Nutley, Teaneck, Dumont, Rutherford, West Orange.

Some may mention that there are many people out there who make good livings without bachelors degrees (which is true); but we must remember that "class" is not only defined by money but also by education too.

https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/no...ountynewjersey



I don't even know what working class means. I would think that if you work and you you're not poor, you're middle class.
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Old 12-28-2018, 02:27 PM
 
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Originally Posted by HudsonCoNJ View Post
I don't even know what working class means. I would think that if you work and you you're not poor, you're middle class.
I think when people refer to working class, they mean those in labor type jobs. Blue-collar workers. Government employees that don't have flashy security clearances and classy-sounding titles. They support themselves and a family well, but nothing in their life is flashy. When you get to middle class, I think that's where the family may occasionally have one flashy item. Maybe mom gets a low-end luxury vehicle like a used excellent condition BMW 3 series. The family can afford a vacation once every year or two. To me, working class is they live comfortably, eat out once in a while, but vacations are difficult to get by and they don't worry about the newest technology or having the nicest car on the block.
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Old 12-28-2018, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Union City, NJ
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Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
I think when people refer to working class, they mean those in labor type jobs. Blue-collar workers. Government employees that don't have flashy security clearances and classy-sounding titles. They support themselves and a family well, but nothing in their life is flashy. When you get to middle class, I think that's where the family may occasionally have one flashy item. Maybe mom gets a low-end luxury vehicle like a used excellent condition BMW 3 series. The family can afford a vacation once every year or two. To me, working class is they live comfortably, eat out once in a while, but vacations are difficult to get by and they don't worry about the newest technology or having the nicest car on the block.


The problem with that line of thinking is it assumes that people live according to their means. Plenty of well paid people carry a lifestyle void of luxuries and plenty of people of modest incomes spend freely without thinking twice. You can't really go by the lifestyle. If we're talking about money there should be a dollar amount we're looking at either as income or net worth.
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Old 12-28-2018, 02:52 PM
 
1,499 posts, read 1,721,188 times
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Originally Posted by HudsonCoNJ View Post
I don't even know what working class means. I would think that if you work and you you're not poor, you're middle class.
People seem to have their own definition of it but the most common definition seems to be. On an individual/family level:

My definition of working class is those who work but make modest incomes and still struggle a lot to make ends meet.

My definition of middle class is those who also work but make enough to be reasonably financially-sound and have a decent amount of disposable income. Usually characterized by having healthy retirement savings, having good credit, having higher education levels and almost always headed by dual-income earners (if the family has kids).

Upper middle class is similar to middle class but a more affluent version. The key difference is UMC people are usually more advanced in their career, higher up/more respected in their organizations and have an extreme value in the quality of school systems for their kids.

Upper Class
Upper Middle Class
Middle Class
Working Class (sometimes called lower middle class)
Lower Class

Last edited by MemoryMaker; 12-28-2018 at 03:51 PM..
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Old 12-29-2018, 07:30 AM
 
3,598 posts, read 1,946,504 times
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Originally Posted by Eristic1 View Post
I expect Montclair/South Orange are what most people think of as far as towns with middle to upper-middle class and significant black populations.

However, even in the towns I've seen mentioned they are divided within the town. With a Black Section, or a Hispanic section. And these divisions tend to run along economic lines as well. Not that Montclair doesn't have wealthy black citizens, but the black areas tend not to be as wealthy as the white areas within the town.

As another poster said, peoples' general preference to live with people like them both by race and by socio-economic status leads to these divisions.
I don't believe that South Orange is segregated within the town.
In fact, from what I understand black households in South Orange have a higher average income than white households in South Orange (the town is middle and upper middle class in general), and many black families live in the fanciest areas of towns, along with many white families.
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