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Old 03-14-2017, 08:37 PM
 
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7SmbV4XRC0

James Marshall was once an up and coming actor. He was in Gladiator with Jon Seda, and Cuba Gooding Jr. Below is a scene with them together.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzVV0xgDXNs

James Marshall grew up in Bergen County before moving to Santa Monica.

So who is his accent? And Jon Seda is also from NJ, what about his?

By the way did that movie Gladiator (1992, not the Russell Crowe movie) take place in NJ? It certainly has that poor industrial feel, and weather pattern of early 90s NJ.
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Old Yesterday, 10:16 AM
 
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Interesting. I grew up in Bergen County, and he sounds "normal" to me in the Letterman interview. He was born in Queens, but then his family moved to Bergen County, but it doesn't say what town, in the 1980s.

The "tuh" for "to" and the way he says "animal" is about right for North Jersey.

His real last name is Greenblatt. Guess Marshall sounded better for an acting career.
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Old Yesterday, 10:57 AM
 
Location: West Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
He was born in Queens, but then his family moved to Bergen County, but it doesn't say what town, in the 1980s.
Serious question: do accents really vary by town in Bergen County? I'm not very familiar with the area, but don't understand how that could be given that the towns are all fairly similar (upper middle class, NY area) and so small in size....
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Old Yesterday, 03:57 PM
 
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Originally Posted by goeagles77 View Post
Serious question: do accents really vary by town in Bergen County? I'm not very familiar with the area, but don't understand how that could be given that the towns are all fairly similar (upper middle class, NY area) and so small in size....
north of Rte 4 is upper class to upper middle class, and white collar. Many are not natives but transplants. South of Rte 4 is more working class and ethnic.
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Old Yesterday, 07:09 PM
 
Location: West Jersey
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Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
north of Rte 4 is upper class to upper middle class, and white collar. Many are not natives but transplants. South of Rte 4 is more working class and ethnic.
Ah, okay....I see what you mean now. There's a similar dynamic in the Boston area (where I am originally from). Contrary to what Hollywood wants you to think, not everyone speaks with a "Boston" accent (and there are several variants of that, besides).

As an outsider, it is safe to say that NJ is chock full of native accents that vary widely by region. And then add transplants from other parts of the US and immigrants from around the world to the mix and you sure do have a lot of different ways of talking crammed in one small state.
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Old Yesterday, 08:22 PM
 
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Originally Posted by goeagles77 View Post
Serious question: do accents really vary by town in Bergen County? I'm not very familiar with the area, but don't understand how that could be given that the towns are all fairly similar (upper middle class, NY area) and so small in size....
Well, first of all, I am 58 years old. The part of Bergen County in which I grew up--NW Bergen, Midland Park to be specific, was certainly not upper middle class. It was a sort of hick town. There was still a sheep farm on the street behind my grandmother's house. We had chickens and bought their corn at the feed and grain on Main Street in Wyckoff. My sister later boarded her horses at a stable in Allendale. My cousin in Mahwah had an RFD mailing address.

The building boom that made those towns more affluent to different degrees began in the 1980s. In a decade, the look and feel of NW Bergen changed drastically. People with NY and Bayonne accents moved in. But yes, there were variations in speech patterns, not maybe town to town but areas of the county, depending on how heavy they had experienced an influx of New Yorkers or people from Hudson County.

All but one of my grandparents were born and raised in Midland Park and lived out their lives in town. I don't know that any of them ever visited New York City. The city was like a foreign country to them. It had little influence until relatively recently, with the exception maybe of Ridgewood, which was a commuter town going back to the late 19th century.

There could also be ethnic influences on language. My town was mostly people of Dutch descent, but there were English, German, etc., also. People I thought of as a kid as "ethnic"--Irish, Italian, Polish--came later in the development of that part of the county, while more eastern areas like Lodi were predominantly Italian for a long time. Their speech patterns were different to my ears.

In 1979, I started working in the city. Jersey people I worked with had strong Jersey City and Bayonne accents. I remember being struck that they didn't say their Rs and some said things like shtring for string. And they thought I talked funny, too!

I moved back to my hometown in the 90s and raised my kid there. The area is very different now, more blended, and the way James Marshall was speaking 25 years ago may not be the same anymore. That kid I raised has a degree in linguistics, and one thing that's sure about language--it is always changing.
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Old Today, 12:06 PM
 
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Originally Posted by goeagles77 View Post
Ah, okay....I see what you mean now. There's a similar dynamic in the Boston area (where I am originally from). Contrary to what Hollywood wants you to think, not everyone speaks with a "Boston" accent (and there are several variants of that, besides).

As an outsider, it is safe to say that NJ is chock full of native accents that vary widely by region. And then add transplants from other parts of the US and immigrants from around the world to the mix and you sure do have a lot of different ways of talking crammed in one small state.
Indeed. Blacks have their own accents, Dominicans have their own accents. But there is also a standard white working class accent.
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Old Today, 09:51 PM
 
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I grew up in New Brunswick, NJ and I've had people tell me they thought I was from Baltimore, MD.
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