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Old 08-05-2017, 09:52 AM
 
137 posts, read 53,162 times
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A few other posters have already mentioned the following reasons for the exodus of millenials:
- Jobs leaving the suburban NJ office parks in favor of the prestige of NYC or lower cost states
- NJ is expensive
- Lousy commute into NYC where the jobs are
- Not as much to do compared to walkable urban areas (or at least not as easy to go out drinking and stumble home via foot)

I'll add that suburban NJ is increasingly geared towards families and the area is making less and less sense for younger folks, the child free and empty nesters unless one is tied to the area for work. The public schools are the attraction to suburban NJ and they do come at a cost in terms of property taxes. I used to work at a suburban office park and they ran a shuttle from the train station for reverse commuters coming in from NYC, Hoboken and JC. Most of the reverse commuters were 20-somethings. My husband and I are child free and we can both be remote for our jobs - we realized staying in Morris County no longer made sense for us so we left. Our townhouse complex went from about 20% of the homes with school aged kids (there used to be a lot of empty nesters) to about 80% of homes with school aged children in a 10 year period.

There are a few regular posters on here that brag about how great their towns are, but in the next sentence they declare they're outta here once their kids are done with the school system. That's increasingly becoming the mindset in NJ and it's not healthy for the state's long-term sustainability.
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Old 08-05-2017, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Union City, NJ
779 posts, read 336,762 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cubicle Dweller View Post
A few other posters have already mentioned the following reasons for the exodus of millenials:
- Jobs leaving the suburban NJ office parks in favor of the prestige of NYC or lower cost states
- NJ is expensive
- Lousy commute into NYC where the jobs are
- Not as much to do compared to walkable urban areas (or at least not as easy to go out drinking and stumble home via foot)

I'll add that suburban NJ is increasingly geared towards families and the area is making less and less sense for younger folks, the child free and empty nesters unless one is tied to the area for work. The public schools are the attraction to suburban NJ and they do come at a cost in terms of property taxes. I used to work at a suburban office park and they ran a shuttle from the train station for reverse commuters coming in from NYC, Hoboken and JC. Most of the reverse commuters were 20-somethings. My husband and I are child free and we can both be remote for our jobs - we realized staying in Morris County no longer made sense for us so we left. Our townhouse complex went from about 20% of the homes with school aged kids (there used to be a lot of empty nesters) to about 80% of homes with school aged children in a 10 year period.

There are a few regular posters on here that brag about how great their towns are, but in the next sentence they declare they're outta here once their kids are done with the school system. That's increasingly becoming the mindset in NJ and it's not healthy for the state's long-term sustainability.

Is it really all that unhealthy though? Aren't these people who are leaving when their kids are out of school just being replaced by NYC transplants and new younger families?
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Old 08-05-2017, 07:10 PM
 
13,167 posts, read 8,311,417 times
Reputation: 8375
Quote:
Originally Posted by HudsonCoNJ View Post
Is it really all that unhealthy though? Aren't these people who are leaving when their kids are out of school just being replaced by NYC transplants and new younger families?
Well yes, but for how long will that go on?


Right now you have a certain demographic being priced out of Brooklyn, Manhattan, and other parts of NYC seeking good schools and so forth for their children. But once that group ages out of their baby making years, and or everyone that wants to move to the suburbs, has; then what else is there?


The overall trend is clear; millennials if they can swing it vastly prefer urban living, even when they have children. The late Boomer generation (early to mid fifties by now), along with Gen X, Y, and whatever are being priced out of Manhattan and so forth *and* because they have kids need to find certain areas to live.
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Old 08-05-2017, 07:14 PM
 
13,167 posts, read 8,311,417 times
Reputation: 8375
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cubicle Dweller View Post
A few other posters have already mentioned the following reasons for the exodus of millenials:
- Jobs leaving the suburban NJ office parks in favor of the prestige of NYC or lower cost states
- NJ is expensive
- Lousy commute into NYC where the jobs are
- Not as much to do compared to walkable urban areas (or at least not as easy to go out drinking and stumble home via foot)

I'll add that suburban NJ is increasingly geared towards families and the area is making less and less sense for younger folks, the child free and empty nesters unless one is tied to the area for work. The public schools are the attraction to suburban NJ and they do come at a cost in terms of property taxes. I used to work at a suburban office park and they ran a shuttle from the train station for reverse commuters coming in from NYC, Hoboken and JC. Most of the reverse commuters were 20-somethings. My husband and I are child free and we can both be remote for our jobs - we realized staying in Morris County no longer made sense for us so we left. Our townhouse complex went from about 20% of the homes with school aged kids (there used to be a lot of empty nesters) to about 80% of homes with school aged children in a 10 year period.

There are a few regular posters on here that brag about how great their towns are, but in the next sentence they declare they're outta here once their kids are done with the school system. That's increasingly becoming the mindset in NJ and it's not healthy for the state's long-term sustainability.


Wages overall have not kept place with inflation (true, not the weird numbers federal government comes up with), for some time. As such many households are making a stretch or whatever to pay for these homes in NJ. They are doing so for the kids. Once that incentive is over (kids are out of primary and or secondary school), there is also a powerful motivation to "cut costs" and move. This is most true with households living in high tax areas who are being bent over a barrel.
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Old 08-06-2017, 12:37 AM
 
Location: NYC
9,844 posts, read 5,842,955 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retired58 View Post
New jersey ranked #1 with the most Adult children living at home with there parents
No kidding, I heard from one lady that her son who is 28. Could not get a stable FT job, sits home most of the time and eats only organic food which costs a lot of money. No wonder, there are atleast 3 WholeFoods nearby.
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Old 08-06-2017, 06:05 AM
 
2,113 posts, read 1,623,014 times
Reputation: 1424
NJ sends the highest percentage of their high school graduates to out of state colleges and since many college grads get jobs in areas within 2-4 hours of their college it is not surprising they do not come back to NJ. Add in NJ kids getting jobs in the 5 large metro areas close to NJ of Boston, NYC, Philadelphia, Baltimore and DC (I know of a number of kids that went to these various cities for jobs) and that adds to the totals.
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Old 08-06-2017, 07:03 AM
 
11,768 posts, read 13,672,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom1944 View Post
NJ sends the highest percentage of their high school graduates to out of state colleges and since many college grads get jobs in areas within 2-4 hours of their college it is not surprising they do not come back to NJ.
Yup!
And, that is not a new phenomenon. When Richard J. Hughes was NJ's Governor, he recognized this problem when he called NJ "The cuckoo state". He made this comment sometime in the mid-late '60s!

When people became confused as to the actual meaning of that comment, he went on to explain that the cuckoo is the only bird that places its eggs in the nests of other bird species, and similarly, he explained, NJ sends the highest percentage of its students out-of-state for their college education--as compared to other states.

IIRC, he made those observations in order to garner support for his efforts to prevent further tuition increases at our state colleges.
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Old 08-07-2017, 08:59 AM
 
Location: NJ
3,391 posts, read 7,500,768 times
Reputation: 2229
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom1944 View Post
NJ sends the highest percentage of their high school graduates to out of state colleges
Even if that is true, aren't most NJ colleges pretty much filled to capacity? It's not like every student who applies to a NJ college is going to get in, even if they wanted to. I attended Rutgers many years ago and the vast majority of students were from NJ.
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Old 08-07-2017, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Weehawken
736 posts, read 437,998 times
Reputation: 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by ansky View Post
Even if that is true, aren't most NJ colleges pretty much filled to capacity? It's not like every student who applies to a NJ college is going to get in, even if they wanted to. I attended Rutgers many years ago and the vast majority of students were from NJ.
Where do those students go after graduation?

NJ doesn't have a huge employment draw and the north is a massive suburb for NY. New grads see the inner suburbs as boring and the gold coast is so expensive they might as well move to NYC.
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Old 08-07-2017, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Holmdel, NJ
20,686 posts, read 25,582,891 times
Reputation: 12689
people are fungible i guess. im not sure exactly when this matters until people decide to handle the big debt balances. then they will fly away like puerto ricans leaving PR.
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