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Old 08-10-2017, 08:16 AM
 
1,998 posts, read 1,163,858 times
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I'd stay, but I'd make a compromise on an expensive house with great schools when I don't even have kids yet. It's how our family of two arts majors with MFA loans from NYU have managed to buy a house in an area with really good schools that allow us to stay within about an hour of Manhattan.

It can be done, just not in the specific town you're looking into. We certainly didn't pay half a million dollars.
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Old 08-10-2017, 01:44 PM
 
1,373 posts, read 674,081 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Busch Boy View Post
We have extensively looked at the Atlanta and Dallas metro areas. There are plenty of affluent suburbs in these cities with excellent schools. ....
Maybe. But also no sidewalks, no public transportation, will have to drive everywhere. Hot weather lasts a lot longer so you would have to spend more time with AC. And Atlanta is now exactly NYC...


And are there jobs there in your industry?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Busch Boy View Post
Yes, I know homes in that price range exist, they're just not what we want. Let's not even mention the property taxes. If I am going to pay 1/2 million dollars for my house, it's going to be my dream home. Ideally, we would like to spend 300-350K max and be mortgage-free ASAP. I recently looked at these homes you mentioned in Ridgewood. Two are tiny cape cods that need renovation, in a flood zone....
Are you sure that you can buy a big house for 350K in Atlanta suburbs with good schools?
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Old 08-10-2017, 02:00 PM
 
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Reading the posts on NJ forum one might get an impression that good schools are only found in NJ. NOT TRUE. Believe it or not, but there are many good schools that ARE NOT in NJ. Just look at the national rankings (there are many, make your pick). NJ has a few spots in the top 100, but so do many other states.
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Old 08-10-2017, 02:12 PM
 
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Georgia is not one of those states.

Texas has two in the top 100 (neither near Dallas by any means), but it's also 31 times the size of New Jersey.
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Old 08-10-2017, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Jersey
2,124 posts, read 2,985,502 times
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Originally Posted by DannyHobkins View Post
Saw this on Drudgereport today.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/new-jer...lem-1501426802

In my opinion, rents and taxes in Hoboken and Morristown are way to expensive. I don't blame millenial for leaving the state.
I moved away year four ago. You need to make $125k/year to begin to live well (going out to bars, restaurants, shows, events, etc; having your own place; travel; and maintaining a decent wardrobe, while still having enough money to save) in JC or Hoboken and $150k/year in NYC (Manhattan/cooler parts of Brooklyn). If you do roommates you can knock about $20k-$30k of the minimum comfort threshold. You can live comfortably in other locales with a large amount of amenities like Seattle, Chicago, Austin, or DC for $90k-$100k/year or Denver, Dallas, Philly, or Portland on $75k-$80k/year.

I wouldn't live in places like Boston, NYC, and the coastal Californian cities unless I was pulling in some "heavy duty" law, medicine, tech, or finance type income. Sure those cities are great, but what's the point of living there if you're in your 20s-30s and you're not making enough to enjoy them? It's fairly easy meeting new people through apps, meet-ups, work, churches, social sports, etc and keeping in touch with family and old friends. That's just my perspective.

Last edited by TylerJAX; 08-10-2017 at 02:29 PM..
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Old 08-10-2017, 02:24 PM
 
2,613 posts, read 894,534 times
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Originally Posted by srdjanmax View Post
Reading the posts on NJ forum one might get an impression that good schools are only found in NJ. NOT TRUE. Believe it or not, but there are many good schools that ARE NOT in NJ. Just look at the national rankings (there are many, make your pick). NJ has a few spots in the top 100, but so do many other states.
I agree with this, although it's all relative. The thing I've found is that many f these very good school districts have home prices much higher than normal for that state, places like St. Augustine Fl or Cary, NC. If you can move and keep your NYC/NJ salary with you, than you're ahead. If you're moving and taking a haircut in pay you're almost back to square one again, minus other issues you may face upon a move.
Also, keep in mind site like greatSchools compare schools to others within the state, so a GA 7 is not the same as an NJ 7, etc.
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Old 08-10-2017, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Weehawken
736 posts, read 437,998 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TylerJAX View Post
I wouldn't live in places like Boston, NYC, and the coastal Californian cities unless I was pulling in some "heavy duty" law, medicine, tech, or finance type income. Sure those cities are great, but what's the point of living there if you're not making enough to enjoy them?
Because some of us don't need to make $150K to enjoy them.
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Old 08-10-2017, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Jersey
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Originally Posted by GoHuskies View Post
Because some of us don't need to make $150K to enjoy them.
Good for you.
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Old 08-10-2017, 03:19 PM
 
931 posts, read 2,926,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaymoney View Post
I'd stay, but I'd make a compromise on an expensive house with great schools when I don't even have kids yet. It's how our family of two arts majors with MFA loans from NYU have managed to buy a house in an area with really good schools that allow us to stay within about an hour of Manhattan.

It can be done, just not in the specific town you're looking into. We certainly didn't pay half a million dollars.
Maybe there IS hope then! However, I find it practically impossible to afford a decent home here while going out often, traveling, investing, and saving up for retirement comfortably here. When I look at home prices here I truly am baffled. Do people really make that much money? Either they do or a good chunk of the population is house-poor. Mortgages shouldn't be more than 28-30% of your yearly income, no?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DefiantNJ View Post
Maybe. But also no sidewalks, no public transportation, will have to drive everywhere. Hot weather lasts a lot longer so you would have to spend more time with AC. And Atlanta is now exactly NYC...


And are there jobs there in your industry?




Are you sure that you can buy a big house for 350K in Atlanta suburbs with good schools?
Cute downtowns and walkability are a plus, not a must for me. While I love the four seasons, the wife hates winter. I know very few, if any, cities will compare to NYC, but I think I can manage as along as I'm within an 45-60 minutes of a city and not in the middle of nowhere.

Yes. Luckily our jobs are not NYC-centric.

Yes, in a ton of places. There are currently 401 (3-bedroom minimum, single-family) homes for sale in that price range (according to realtor.com) in Alpharetta, Johns Creek, Milton, & Suwanee and 1,146 homes in Frisco, McKinney & Allen. All exclusive Atlanta and Dallas suburbs respectively.

Last edited by Busch Boy; 08-10-2017 at 03:43 PM..
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Old 08-10-2017, 04:42 PM
 
8,463 posts, read 1,883,315 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retriever View Post
Yup!
And, that is not a new phenomenon. When Richard J. Hughes was NJ's Governor, he recognized this problem when he called NJ "The cuckoo state". He made this comment sometime in the mid-late '60s!

When people became confused as to the actual meaning of that comment, he went on to explain that the cuckoo is the only bird that places its eggs in the nests of other bird species, and similarly, he explained, NJ sends the highest percentage of its students out-of-state for their college education--as compared to other states.

IIRC, he made those observations in order to garner support for his efforts to prevent further tuition increases at our state colleges.

This ,but it's not the only state to have this problem.
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