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Old 08-12-2017, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Dyker Heights Brooklyn, Ny
6 posts, read 7,129 times
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My husband and I are currently exploring the idea of moving to NJ suburbs. We have 2 kids- 3 and 5 months so the move is primarily for schools and maybe a bit more space. We currently own a 2 family house in Bath Beach/ Dyker area in Brooklyn so we have the option of converting our house into duplex for space. However, it would be nice to get more space for less money. I think if we sell it, we can get ~800L.
As I start researching the towns that fits our wish list- good commute to NYC, good schools and walkable- I am seeing that home prices are 500-600K plus higher taxes and higher commute cost. I am starting to wonder if the cost of living might be a wash. Although I don't love Brooklyn, (I feel like it;s too congested and dirty) we both grew up here so have strong network of friends and families that we can lean on when it comes to childcare. I work in WTC and my husband works 10 mins from our house in Brooklyn but might be able to put in a transfer for NJ.

So let's say if commute time and cost of living is a wash, then the deciding factor would be are the schools much better? How are NJ schools better? Any insight/perspective is appreciated!
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Old 08-12-2017, 03:26 PM
 
1,998 posts, read 1,165,292 times
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Schools are generally better until the high school level, where they can test into specific schools that meet their interests. But until then, especially middle school, it's still more about where you live and likely more having to fight for what's right for your kids.

But frankly, living ten minutes from work is a pretty good deal when you consider all the various times you'll have to run home because they're sick or whatever. There's a lot to be said for growing up in NYC, if you can afford it and you're happy I'm not sure moving is going to be better.
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Old 08-12-2017, 04:24 PM
 
286 posts, read 254,084 times
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I think if you are planning to send to private school in NYC then moving is worth it. 20k in taxes won't even come close to 2 private school tuitions in NYC. Also NYC has public preschool so that's another 25 k saved by staying in Brooklyn for that year.
Between commuting costs and savings on NYC taxes - it's a wash.
My guess is that the real estate in Brooklyn will increase faster than most towns in nj with already good schools so from an investment standpoint staying is better - plus it costs to move.
I'd stay unless you really hate the school choices and just want out of Brooklyn.
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:57 AM
 
Location: Dyker Heights Brooklyn, Ny
6 posts, read 7,129 times
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So I looked at Greatschool.org and see that for example the rating at some of the school in Fair Lawn NJ is 8-10. When I looked up the school by me, it's actually a 9. So based on this, it seems like the NYC public school that we are zoned for is actually just as good or better than the NJ schools. But people often say NJ schools are better than NYC and that's why they are moving there. What am I missing here?
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Old 08-13-2017, 08:09 AM
 
8,464 posts, read 1,890,009 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ccthealias View Post
So I looked at Greatschool.org and see that for example the rating at some of the school in Fair Lawn NJ is 8-10. When I looked up the school by me, it's actually a 9. So based on this, it seems like the NYC public school that we are zoned for is actually just as good or better than the NJ schools. But people often say NJ schools are better than NYC and that's why they are moving there. What am I missing here?

They are. Can't tell you what you are missing,don't know what it is you are looking for?You say you dislike Brooklyn ,ok,so the school shouldn't matter,find some place you and your family like and the school will take care of it's self.
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Old 08-13-2017, 06:16 PM
 
1,998 posts, read 1,165,292 times
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You are missing that Great Schools does it by state. So Georgia, for example, has 9's and 10's that would probably be a 5 in NJ. So you can't compare NY to NJ on Great Schools, which is unfortunate.
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Old 08-13-2017, 07:34 PM
46H
 
552 posts, read 286,731 times
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We moved out of NYC for NJ when it was time for middle school.

Your local k-5 will most likely be decent. Ours was excellent. The problem is middle school and high school. You have to visit, pick and apply to various middle schools and then high schools in order to avoid the general population middle schools and high schools. The decision is also based on your child's academic and testing scores. There are various specialty and high performance middle schools. You have to now try and figure out which one will work best for your child. You then have to rank them for your preference. The school you might think perfect for your child might include a horrible commute. Then you have to do it again for high school (there are some 6-12 schools so you might avoid applying to high school).

At the time, our child was on a science track. He got into a science middle school and would have probably attended either Brooklyn Tech or Bronx Science. Based on where we lived, he would have been facing 30-45 minute commute for Brooklyn Tech and 50-70 minute commute for Bronx Science, both via subway. That sucks.

If you move out to NJ, the public schools are based on the town you choose, no applications, crazy long commutes for your child, choosing some specialty that may or may not be what your child wants, crap facilities, sports fields that are an hour away from the school and no stress for choosing your child's education.

One more thing, during high school, our son decided he did not like science as a potential career track. It did not affect his college prep path at all in our NJ high school. Good thing we did not have to base his high school choice and focus on his feelings as a 5th grader.

This was not the only reason for our move, but it was an important factor.
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Old 08-14-2017, 04:41 AM
 
Location: Dyker Heights Brooklyn, Ny
6 posts, read 7,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 46H View Post
We moved out of NYC for NJ when it was time for middle school.

Your local k-5 will most likely be decent. Ours was excellent. The problem is middle school and high school. You have to visit, pick and apply to various middle schools and then high schools in order to avoid the general population middle schools and high schools. The decision is also based on your child's academic and testing scores. There are various specialty and high performance middle schools. You have to now try and figure out which one will work best for your child. You then have to rank them for your preference. The school you might think perfect for your child might include a horrible commute. Then you have to do it again for high school (there are some 6-12 schools so you might avoid applying to high school).

At the time, our child was on a science track. He got into a science middle school and would have probably attended either Brooklyn Tech or Bronx Science. Based on where we lived, he would have been facing 30-45 minute commute for Brooklyn Tech and 50-70 minute commute for Bronx Science, both via subway. That sucks.

If you move out to NJ, the public schools are based on the town you choose, no applications, crazy long commutes for your child, choosing some specialty that may or may not be what your child wants, crap facilities, sports fields that are an hour away from the school and no stress for choosing your child's education.

One more thing, during high school, our son decided he did not like science as a potential career track. It did not affect his college prep path at all in our NJ high school. Good thing we did not have to base his high school choice and focus on his feelings as a 5th grader.

This was not the only reason for our move, but it was an important factor.
Yes, growing up in Brooklyn, we definitely do not want our kid taking the MTA bus or subway school. How is the transition for your child moving at the middle school age?
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Old 08-14-2017, 08:03 AM
 
97 posts, read 69,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaymoney View Post
You are missing that Great Schools does it by state. So Georgia, for example, has 9's and 10's that would probably be a 5 in NJ. So you can't compare NY to NJ on Great Schools, which is unfortunate.
Cannot agree with this statement. You can verify this by just comparing the HS graduation rate, the average SAT test scores, college readiness and AP course participation.
Schools with the same score in GA & NY have very similar test scores and ratings.
A local HS in my county here in GA is rated a 9 by Greatschools . The school has a 96% graduation rate, 1729 average SAT score (nat'l avg is 1484, GA1459, NY1467) and 50% AP course participation with 93% pass rate. No where near a 5 score in any state.


As far as the OP I would stay in Brooklyn if the schools are good and you don't have to rely on private.
NJ property taxes are really high (grew up in NY & have family in both places) and the extra income on the multifamily (if you choose to go that way) will make a big difference.

Good Luck
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Old 08-14-2017, 09:03 AM
 
46 posts, read 19,173 times
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Do not buy this nonsense about NJ and superior schools. That's just the way for New Jerseyans to compensate for the fact that NJ is a sad place to live. "Yes we live in the armpit of America, but we have the best schools!!! Even the two New Jersey based NFL teams don't want to get associated with NJ: they call themselves the NEW YORK Giants and the NEW YORK Jets.
On a more realistic note, NJ does have a good school system. However, it is nowhere near superior to other states, as one might conclude after reading many posts in this forum. If you already live in a neighborhood with good schools, no need to look for them elsewhere. Good schools are good schools, doesn't matter where they are, Brooklyn or NJ.
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