U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Jersey
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-03-2019, 07:31 PM
 
203 posts, read 127,658 times
Reputation: 155

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCT View Post
I did not say their data is wrong but people need to realize this is only one company’s data. Because they only analyze their own very limited data and not that from other moving companies, the conclusion that this ranking has any meaning or value is flawed. Other moving companies that don’t track and release their moves to the media could be significantly different. For all we know it could show New Jersey is no where near the highest in move outs. Jay
Dude i see your another post try to prove data is flaw, im not saying is not but the fact is working /middle class people no longer can comfortable live in nj or ct. Seems that not gonna change anytime soon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-03-2019, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Union City, NJ
1,236 posts, read 730,780 times
Reputation: 1785
And I still canít find a parking spot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-03-2019, 09:01 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
717 posts, read 270,809 times
Reputation: 348
It is so hard to believe that NJ is number one is move-outs. I would never believe this is true, majority of people who even live in NJ are natives and have lived here their entire life, but I am guess I am not paying attention the Millennials enough. They are mainly the ones who cannot afford the state. If NJ is a move-out state, then this is the reason why NJ gets its bad reputation of being an "industrial dump".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-03-2019, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
23,386 posts, read 22,388,425 times
Reputation: 28590
Quote:
Originally Posted by Docendo discimus View Post
That's hilarious.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2019, 05:03 AM
 
14,341 posts, read 4,445,423 times
Reputation: 5365
Quote:
Originally Posted by boney89 View Post
Dude i see your another post try to prove data is flaw, im not saying is not but the fact is working /middle class people no longer can comfortable live in nj or ct. Seems that not gonna change anytime soon.
Not being a jerk but working/ middle class people have it tough in every state .........it's not a New Jersey thing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2019, 09:07 AM
 
Location: NJ
23,111 posts, read 29,083,970 times
Reputation: 14984
you have to figure that as people become more mobile (one big shift may be working from home) there will be an overall pattern of movement away from high tax cities/states. this could cause some form of death spiral for places that have used high taxes for public assistance for their poor population. they would be in a position where that poor population doesnt move but higher earners/productive people move away. so they lose the tax revenue and keep the liabilities. id imagine nyc and nj cities would see this program pretty acutely.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2019, 09:41 AM
 
5,858 posts, read 13,482,510 times
Reputation: 3164
It's a two-fold situation.

1) Retiring boomers continuing to move to Southern states as they have for decades. This is nothing new and it will never stop.

2) Millennials neither want, nor can afford, the houses that retiring boomers are selling. We don't want to live in a suburb far secluded from everything going on. We want to be in urban centers. NJ only has a few of those, and they're all doing quite well. All of Hudson County, Newark, and Morristown. To some degree, Asbury Park, which is also getting much nicer. NJ's problem is it was basically built as a giant suburb to NYC and Philly. But look where the urban centers with rapid transit are, and you'll find young, educated people with disposable income who love where they live. Many of those millennials are also moving into the respective major cities--NYC and Philly. Those can't afford NYC, Philly, or the nearby NJ cities like JC, Hoboken, Collingswood, etc. are either still living at home or moving out. There is just too much SFH housing stock in the state. I personally know people who have been living at home, but the parents plan on retiring to the South. If the family is financially lucky enough, they keep the house in NJ for the kids to live in while working. The not as fortunate ones have to sell the NJ house, leaving their child without a place to live. And these are people with professional degrees who just cannot afford a comfortable lifestyle in NJ. So the ones that one end up homeless are moving away.

Really the only hopes for keeping millennials in the state are 1) better transit access in Hudson/Essex/Bergen so people can spread out and have easy commutes into Manhattan, 2) redevelopment of the shore towns more to create a real hub of commerce that is contained within the state since places like Asbury Park are redeveloping and AC is building new hotels, and 3) making the South Jersey towns along PATCO more desirable with denser housing and looser liquor laws. Keeping NJ as a commuter state for NYC and Philly is not a good long-term plan, and has more boomers retire to the South, their houses are completely undesirable or unattainable for younger generations.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2019, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
23,386 posts, read 22,388,425 times
Reputation: 28590
Towns along the PATCO line are pretty much built out. It's mostly single family homes, but the undeveloped areas are preserved, reserved, and whatever they could come up with.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2019, 01:10 PM
 
5,858 posts, read 13,482,510 times
Reputation: 3164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
Towns along the PATCO line are pretty much built out. It's mostly single family homes, but the undeveloped areas are preserved, reserved, and whatever they could come up with.
Yeah and the parts full of SFH should increase their density and new construction along Haddon Ave should be all mixed-use buildings, and maybe on a few other streets as well. With PATCO, parts of south Jersey have at least some of the potential that Hudson County has, it just needs to be capitalized on.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2019, 01:37 PM
 
649 posts, read 332,527 times
Reputation: 593
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCT View Post
I did not say their data is wrong but people need to realize this is only one companyís data. Because they only analyze their own very limited data and not that from other moving companies, the conclusion that this ranking has any meaning or value is flawed. Other moving companies that donít track and release their moves to the media could be significantly different. For all we know it could show New Jersey is no where near the highest in move outs. Jay
I think you bring up a legitimate point, I just happen to believe the study since they have no incentive to exaggerate. The counter-argument to your argument is that other studies have shown that wealth and jobs are leaving the state.


Quote:
Originally Posted by G1.. View Post
Not being a jerk but working/ middle class people have it tough in every state .........it's not a New Jersey thing.
What I (and others) have been saying is that in New Jersey, it is a lot harder being working/middle class than in other states. I am not suggesting that people don't struggle outside of New Jersey. In fact, New Jersey is better than most of the country in terms of access to good public schools and medical care (I'm not talking about insurance, but rather access to great Doctors and facilities). But it is a lot harder being in the working or middle classes in New Jersey when it comes to paying the bills. It costs more to rent or buy a home here than the national average, taxes are some of the highest in the nation, and food costs are higher than the national average. So it really isn't just about property taxes or even income taxes, mortgages or rents and simply putting food on the table is a lot more than in other places. On top of that, our infrastructure and gas tax make automobile ownership higher than in other places.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Jersey
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top