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Old 01-12-2019, 05:15 PM
 
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I like Southern Bergen County towns, while despising northern Bergen County towns.

Hudson County is cool too.
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Old 01-12-2019, 07:38 PM
 
325 posts, read 335,847 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MemoryMaker View Post
My impression of the Jersey suburbs. Feel free to disagree..

Lower Bergen County: Safe but unimpressive suburbia. Smaller houses, strip malls, highways and little to no charm.

Upper Bergen County: The sticks. Affluent but ultra-boring suburbia. Not recommended for people with suicidal tendencies.

Suburban Essex County: Mostly gorgeous older homes in affluent or okay neighborhoods but with sky-high taxes and still a stones-throw away from the ghetto.

Urban Essex County: Almost completely ghetto. Contains the absolute worst areas in the entire NYC metro area..will make you lose faith in humanity quick!

Hudson County: Mostly urban/dense-suburban hybrid areas ranging from hip/chic to straight-up sleazy/overcrowded. No idea why this is not NYC's 6th borough.

Union County: Similar to Lower Bergen County but with even more industrial crap (and a bit more planned out).

Passaic County: Unlimited supply of poor immigrants living in beat-down urban areas and suburbs that you surely wouldn't be writing home about.
Union County similar to lower Bergen County? You do realize Westfield and Summit, not to mention Cranford and Scotch Plains are in Union County? Take a drive to these towns and educate yourself man.
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Old 01-12-2019, 08:17 PM
 
Location: NJ
3,862 posts, read 8,749,641 times
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Originally Posted by King of the South View Post
Union County similar to lower Bergen County? You do realize Westfield and Summit, not to mention Cranford and Scotch Plains are in Union County? Take a drive to these towns and educate yourself man.
While those are indeed nice towns, the Elizabeth, Linden, Rahway, Roselle corridor is a lot worse than anywhere in lower Bergen County. So I guess you could say it's a wash.
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Old 01-13-2019, 08:52 PM
 
448 posts, read 1,157,645 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MemoryMaker View Post
My impression of the Jersey suburbs. Feel free to disagree..

Lower Bergen County: Safe but unimpressive suburbia. Smaller houses, strip malls, highways and little to no charm.

Upper Bergen County: The sticks. Affluent but ultra-boring suburbia. Not recommended for people with suicidal tendencies.

Suburban Essex County: Mostly gorgeous older homes in affluent or okay neighborhoods but with sky-high taxes and still a stones-throw away from the ghetto.

Urban Essex County: Almost completely ghetto. Contains the absolute worst areas in the entire NYC metro area..will make you lose faith in humanity quick!

Hudson County: Mostly urban/dense-suburban hybrid areas ranging from hip/chic to straight-up sleazy/overcrowded. No idea why this is not NYC's 6th borough.

Union County: Similar to Lower Bergen County but with even more industrial crap (and a bit more planned out).

Passaic County: Unlimited supply of poor immigrants living in beat-down urban areas and suburbs that you surely wouldn't be writing home about.

Great post!! No mention of Morris?
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Old 01-14-2019, 08:09 AM
 
14,507 posts, read 4,524,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MemoryMaker View Post
My impression of the Jersey suburbs. Feel free to disagree..

Lower Bergen County: Safe but unimpressive suburbia. Smaller houses, strip malls, highways and little to no charm.

Upper Bergen County: The sticks. Affluent but ultra-boring suburbia. Not recommended for people with suicidal tendencies.

Suburban Essex County: Mostly gorgeous older homes in affluent or okay neighborhoods but with sky-high taxes and still a stones-throw away from the ghetto.

Urban Essex County: Almost completely ghetto. Contains the absolute worst areas in the entire NYC metro area..will make you lose faith in humanity quick!

Hudson County: Mostly urban/dense-suburban hybrid areas ranging from hip/chic to straight-up sleazy/overcrowded. No idea why this is not NYC's 6th borough.

Union County: Similar to Lower Bergen County but with even more industrial crap (and a bit more planned out).

Passaic County: Unlimited supply of poor immigrants living in beat-down urban areas and suburbs that you surely wouldn't be writing home about.
Disagree but to the extent of having lived in NJ for all my life and admit to not knowing about all the counties and don't know how anyone can say they do and then make wild assumptions about them.
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Old 01-14-2019, 08:13 AM
 
14,507 posts, read 4,524,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of the South View Post
Union County similar to lower Bergen County? You do realize Westfield and Summit, not to mention Cranford and Scotch Plains are in Union County? Take a drive to these towns and educate yourself man.
I was thinking the same thing when he said Essex county. Millburn /Short Hill ,Essex Fells ,North Caldwell ,Montclair , Verona, West Orange .
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Old 01-14-2019, 01:22 PM
 
Location: NYC area
499 posts, read 396,880 times
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OP--

Here are my impressions. I live in Hoboken, have lived in the waterfront area of J.C., and like to explore all over Weehawken, the Heights, and parts of Union City and surrounds.

But take a look at this map: This will tell you a lot about what to expect in each area you mentioned. You can zoom in and out. Educational Attainment in America


Hoboken: People that don't actually live in Hoboken have no clue what it's actually like. These boards tend to either associate it with the concentration of bars right by the PATH (rowdy, lots of young 20s from the rest of Jersey, supposed "frat culture") or with how Hoboken was 20 years ago. It's changed. It's economically and educationally a "super neighborhood", and area that has a much larger than average % of people with high incomes and high education levels. So it's a matter of time until school demographics catch up. Obviously, housing is expensive, so it's a push and pull between space/$ and good commute to the city that either keeps people in town or pushes them to the suburbs. It skews white statistically, but is still fairly diverse. Commute is awesome because you have choices and back up options: bus, 2 ferries, PATH, light rail, Lincoln Tunnel or Holland Tunnel--it's all close. The ferry can get you to the east side of Midtown in about 7 minutes. I personally have driven during non-rush hour times and gone from inside my house to parked and in my husband's office in 15 minutes. We recently drove from our place to a restaurant by Bryant Park on a Saturday morning at 9 am (to meet friends for brunch) and were parked within 14 minutes, no lie. We told them "On our way, should arrive and be parked in 30 min!" and then got there early and had to sit around twiddling our thumbs for a while.

Waterfront JC: Similar to Hoboken, except Newport and Exchange place skew East and South Asian, demographically. Hamilton Park, Van Vorst skew more White. Grove st. is more hipstery and has more people of color actually living there, although as prices rise on the west side of the waterfront area, original residents are being economically displaced. Schools range from "improving" to "better than almost any other school in New Jersey", depending on the school. Cornelia Bradford (PS 16) now routinely outscores elementary schools in Millburn, Chatham, Montclair, Maplewood, Ridgewood, etc. on standardized tests. Newport and Exchange are more high rises. Transportation depends on particular neighborhood, but people still have a choice of bus, light rail, PATH or Ferry depending on where they live. Obviously, the more transport options, the higher the real estate prices.

The rest of JC: I'm lumping it all together, which is semi ridiculous but this isn't a JC thread, so I'll just say this: it's ranging from "up and coming" to already arrived. I don't think there's any area where development and growth isn't happening. Obviously some places are still gritty, but more and more neighborhoods are improving, which also means....higher prices. There are some good schools scattered around, especially in the heights. Kids from anywhere can test into the best middle and high schools--it's kind of like NYC that way, which can be good and bad. The system can be overwhelming to understand and to "game" to get the best options for your kids, and there can be winners and losers with that type of system, but McNair is one of the best HS in the state, so there's that. If you wanted to know more about particular areas of JC (demographics and transport), it would really need it's own thread because it's just so diverse and changing so rapidly.

Union City: traditionally hispanic, now there are parts that are very South Asian. More house for your money in Union City, and don't totally discount the schools. They've been doing great things there, and they have a magnet school (kids get in by application only) for grades k-8 or maybe 1-8 that is an amazing school, on par with any top elementary school in any suburb, if you go by standardized test scores. It used to be called Woodrow Wilson, but was just relocated to a new building and re-named and I can't recall the new name anymore. Transport depends on neighborhood, but you mainly just have city busses and jitneys (well, and cars). Someone else can correct me if I'm wrong on that. I haven't ever lived in UC, but we do go there for some recreational sports and particular parks and things. By the way, their parks and rec department is KILLING IT in the public parks realm, at least in terms of kids playgrounds. They have some amazing playgrounds,splash pads, and public pools (Hoboken does not have a public pool anymore, although supposedly there are talks of getting one). Union city is not unsafe, it's just a more blue collar area for now. I actually know someone (I would say acquaintances, not really friends) who is on the UC PD, and said they joined in UC because it's such a safe town. They also grew up there, so....they might be biased.

Weehawken--depends on the area. Schools are similar to Hoboken and Union city if you look at scores and demographics--NJ state publishes all schools' test scores and ethnic and socioeconomic info each year. Some schools are slightly better than others. The shades area is small and kind of close knit--it has just the bus to NYC but it's a good commute if you can catch a 126 that isn't already full by the time it reaches that stop. The bluffs also have the bus, and there are some areas of the bluffs with amazing, beautiful, suburban-esque houses (for 1-5 million, of course) with amazing views of the city. But it really varies street-by-street up there. Some streets/houses are great and some are a bit seedy. Like the back of Weehawken is no different than Union City or the heights of JC--then on Hamilton Place, you have some 5 million dollar houses overlooking the world (I like to run, and I have long running routes and sometimes end up running around up there, so I've seen basically every block, on foot). There's only a tiny area of weehawken that would have a viable commute via ferry--just the area right on the water.

West New York is kind of interchangeable with the above: There's the section on the water and the section on the ridge, and it may as well be 2 different cities. Waterfront is similar to JC waterfront or Edgewater or anything else Weehawken waterfront. They could all be the same town, they are basically interchangeable. The area on the ridge is also kind of interchangeable with the areas of UC and Weehawken on the ridge. You have some nicer houses close to JFK blvd with amazing NYC views, a smattering of high rise buildings, a mishmash of low rise buildings, and then the random single family homes/duplexes towards the western side.

Weehawken, Union Ciy, Jersey City, and Hoboken are all former Abbott schools, so they have all been offering free public pre-schools programs the past few years. I don't know how long the funding will last, but residents can take advantage of free pre-k as long as they can get it. Hoboken has free pre-k3 and pre-k4; Jersey City has an odd system that I don't totally understand because they subcontract to local private daycares and preschools in some cases, and use public school buildings in other cases. I *think* U.C., West New York, and Weehawken might only offer pre-k4, but maybe someone else can weigh in on that. But this is great for parents when you consider many suburbs still only do half day kindergarten. Residents of these towns get an additional 2-3 years of free public school if they want it.

I know nothing about Guttenberg except that one dang traffic light on River Road by those 2 tower condo buildings are a nightmare and someone needs to do a traffic study there. It's tiny.

Fort Lee and Palisades park skew east Asian, as I'm sure you already know. Waterfront area has more condo/apartment buildings/town homes and the areas up higher have more single family homes or those newer town house developments. Some schools are very good. I don't know that much else about it.

Leonia is similar ish to Ft Lee, but slightly more suburban and more single family homes.

North Bergen: Tiny waterfront area--the rest is up on the ridge and very meh (sorry, just my opinion).

I know nothing about Englewood or Englewood cliffs, except that I know Englewood Cliffs kids try to avoid high school in Englewood, so you can draw your own conclusions there. There have been multiple court battles about this.



Frankly, many of these towns/areas could totally just merge together, they are so indistinguishable from each other. But NJ is weird and every other mile, people like to have a brand new town.
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Old 01-14-2019, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachouse View Post
Great post!! No mention of Morris?
Morris isn’t exactly “close-in.”
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Old 01-14-2019, 01:50 PM
 
Location: NJ
3,862 posts, read 8,749,641 times
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Originally Posted by lammius View Post
Morris isn’t exactly “close-in.”
Agreed. From my perspective "close in" would be the region north of I-78, south of I-80, and East of I-287.
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Old 01-14-2019, 02:19 PM
 
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^^ When I went to Hoboken a few months ago, literally every other person had a college hoody on...really took me back! The place just screamed, "Bro, imma 23 year old college grad with a Machelors in Dildonics.. lemme know what you majored in so i can add u on snapchat".

I loved the waterfront area of City. Its like a cleaner, newer and more utopian version of Manhattan.
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