U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Jersey
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-25-2019, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
58,212 posts, read 56,271,194 times
Reputation: 69280

Advertisements

https://www.nj.com/news/2019/08/in-l...f-project.html

Looks like deciding to go Design-Build is part of the savings, and also more advance information is now known, as I speculated might be part of it (though it doesn't give the details of what that was.)

As some of the commenters point out, let's hope that this isn't pushing off problems down the road that will be taken care of by change orders and "unforeseen conditions".
__________________
Moderator posts are in RED.
City-Data Terms of Service: http://www.city-data.com/terms.html

Last edited by Mightyqueen801; 08-25-2019 at 01:04 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-25-2019, 07:29 PM
 
21,933 posts, read 14,616,403 times
Reputation: 15468
For reference how PRR built the original North River tunnels:

https://railroadpostcards.blogspot.c...tation-in.html

http://caldernorthern.uk/wp-content/...-York-City.pdf

Wonder how different things would be (if at all), had original plans to have RR tracks on GWB been carried out.

While a bridge would be cheaper than tunnel, that idea was squashed back at the time, and is a non-starter today.

Furthermore with GWB in place there isn't another good spot until you get further upstate to the Poughkeepsie RR bridge which has long been covered to "rail trails", so again that isn't going to happen either.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poughkeepsie_Bridge
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2019, 11:15 PM
 
9,590 posts, read 15,200,594 times
Reputation: 9873
Looks to me like they're lowering the estimates without changing anything, so it'll just result in larger overruns. As for all the labor stuff... forget about it, that stuff's politically essential. Any cutting has to come in the useful bits, not the jobs program.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2019, 11:36 PM
 
2,297 posts, read 1,308,385 times
Reputation: 2851
Quote:
Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
^ That's bad that the only way to reduce cost is to value engineer (poorer design quality and strength) but still keep the waste from labor, unions and bureaucracy.

It should be the other way around. Trim the fat, not the muscle.

You also forgot to mention the excessive salaries for the executives of the private contractor's companies who do the actual work. Somehow private sector is not proving to deliver either cost effective or timely solutions in the United States. Maybe it is time to go back to having larger numbers of moderately paid, well managed public employees who do a substantial share of construction work?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2019, 06:47 PM
 
21,933 posts, read 14,616,403 times
Reputation: 15468
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefiantNJ View Post
You also forgot to mention the excessive salaries for the executives of the private contractor's companies who do the actual work. Somehow private sector is not proving to deliver either cost effective or timely solutions in the United States. Maybe it is time to go back to having larger numbers of moderately paid, well managed public employees who do a substantial share of construction work?
A few problems with that; first and foremost what do you do with those executives/employees during down times? That is after a major project is over and nothing else is shaking or coming down the pike are you going to pay all those people to sit around on their a$$es all day? Because at least far as workers are concerned (who would most certainly be union), they get paid regardless.

Even back in days of great private railroads with their huge projects, they didn't keep engineering departments fully staffed. Much if not all the work on major projects was hired/bid out with a good amount of labor being either immigrants (legal, visas, or whatever), and or drawn from a supply of unskilled labor.

It is a well known fact public union employees receive higher wages/compensation than those doing similar work in private sector. https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/ar...-costs-so-much

Paying "moderate" wages would be up to the respective union, and I promise you it will not be anywhere near what you'd consider average.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Jersey
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top