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Old 08-29-2019, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,079 posts, read 700,413 times
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One of the most notable westward migration trends in the post-revolutionary United States from approximately 1795 to 1835 was the mass influx of “Yankees” (i.e., people of colonial English stock) from the New England states of Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Vermont to New York. By the mid-nineteenth century, every single county in New York State reflected Yankee cultural influence due to a high population of Yankee settlers in every region of the state. Of course, the canny, scrupulous nature that is commonly associated with the Yankee allowed the settlers to flourish in education, politics, industry and trade in New York State and other settlement areas located further westward (e.g., northeastern Ohio, southern Michigan, etc.). In some New York counties, particularly those with fertile soil, Yankees were the dominant cultural force, having supplanted the native New Yorkers of Dutch and German extraction in less than one generation.

As you may assume, there is a significant amount of literature on the outsized influence of Yankee settlers and their prodigy in New York State and, to a lesser extent, northern Pennsylvania. However, based on my own personal research, there is very little published literature on Yankee settlement and development in New Jersey. Naturally, this dearth of information leads me to believe that, despite New Jersey’s close proximity to New England and its border with and strong cultural ties to New York, Yankees did not extensively settle New Jersey. Of course, I find this perplexing because Yankees were settling “faraway lands” such as Buffalo and Rochester, but not Newark, Patterson or Trenton, unless I am mistaken.

Does anyone have any information to share regarding historic Yankee settlement in New Jersey or, perhaps, the reasons why Yankees may have skipped over the state in favor of lands in central and western New York and northern Pennsylvania? Was the good farmland in New Jersey already consumed by other settler groups, or were there cultural and/or geographic forces at play that prevented widespread diffusion of Yankee settlers within the state?

Last edited by Bert_from_back_East; 08-29-2019 at 09:04 PM..
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Old 08-29-2019, 09:14 PM
 
2,897 posts, read 4,472,163 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
One of the most notable westward migration trends in the post-revolutionary United States from approximately 1795 to 1835 was the mass influx of “Yankees” (i.e., people of colonial English stock) from the New England states of Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Vermont to New York. By the mid-nineteenth century, every single county in New York State reflected Yankee cultural influence due to a high population of Yankee settlers in every region of the state. Of course, the canny, scrupulous nature that is commonly associated with the Yankee allowed the settlers to flourish in education, politics, industry and trade in New York State and other settlement areas located further westward (e.g., northeastern Ohio, Michigan, etc.). In some New York counties, particularly those with fertile soil, Yankees were the dominant cultural force, having supplanted the native New Yorkers of Dutch and German extraction in less than one generation.

As you may assume, there is a significant amount of literature on the outsized influence of Yankee settlers and their prodigy in New York State and, to a lesser extent, northern Pennsylvania. However, based on my own personal research, there is very little published literature on Yankee settlement and development in New Jersey. Naturally, this dearth of information leads me to believe that, despite New Jersey’s close proximity to New England and its border with and strong cultural ties to New York, Yankees did not extensively settle New Jersey. Of course, I find this perplexing because Yankees icwere settling “faraway lands” such as Buffalo and Rochester, but not Newark, Patterson or Trenton, unless I am mistaken.

Does anyone have any information to share regarding historic Yankee settlement in New Jersey or, perhaps, the reasons why Yankees may have skipped over the state in favor of lands in central and western New York and northern Pennsylvania? Was the good farmland in New Jersey already consumed by other settler groups, or were there cultural and/or geographic forces at play that prevented widespread diffusion of Yankee settlers within the state?

I looked at the 1850 census on www.familysearch.org
1850 was the first census that asked for a specific place of birth.


In 1850 in the state of NJ the following number of people stated they were born in the following states:
Born Connecticut - 2,194 people
Born Massachusetts - 1,649 people
Born Rhode Island - 293 people

Born Vermont - 296 people


On the other hand, in 1850 1,280 people were living in Connecticut that stated they were born in New Jersey.
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Old 08-29-2019, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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First of all, the title makes me wince.

NJ is not "westward" coming from New England. It's south.

Secondly, New Jersey, like New York City, had the Dutch as its early settlers in the 17th century. Central Jersey had more English, and south Jersey Swedish, to oversimplify. The point is that Jersey was already long established before any Yankees drifted down.
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Old 08-30-2019, 04:54 AM
 
Location: Tucson AZ & Leipzig, Germany
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My mother's ancestors started out in Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1634. After a few generations, they were scattered around places that eventually became states in the USA, mostly Connecticut, Massachusetts and New Hampshire. After the revolution, some got land grants near what is now Broome County, NY (in lieu of monetary compensation for military service).

In the 1870s, after the civil war, rail travel was available heading west, and places in the great plains offered free land, or very low cost land to anyone who was willing to establish a home and farm the land. So my great great grandparents set off for St Joseph, Missouri on the train. Later they went on to southeast Nebraska.

Why would anyone from New England take a train or other land or water route that would go through NJ, to get to points west? The train, land or water routes were along the Hudson-Erie Canal across New York State, then Buffalo, Cleveland, Chicago, Omaha, etc.
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Old 08-30-2019, 06:57 AM
 
14,839 posts, read 17,900,956 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
First of all, the title makes me wince.

NJ is not "westward" coming from New England. It's south.

Secondly, New Jersey, like New York City, had the Dutch as its early settlers in the 17th century. Central Jersey had more English, and south Jersey Swedish, to oversimplify. The point is that Jersey was already long established before any Yankees drifted down.
+1
Additionally, Newark was first settled--in 1666--by Puritans who had migrated SOUTH from Connecticut.

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Old 08-30-2019, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,079 posts, read 700,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
First of all, the title makes me wince.

NJ is not "westward" coming from New England. It's south.

Secondly, New Jersey, like New York City, had the Dutch as its early settlers in the 17th century. Central Jersey had more English, and south Jersey Swedish, to oversimplify. The point is that Jersey was already long established before any Yankees drifted down.
Unfortunately, as I described in my original post, there is seemingly little information on the original English settlers of New Jersey during the colonial period of American history. For example, I am still unclear if a considerable number of English settlers directly immigrated to New Jersey or if they were migrants from nearby areas such as New England and Pennsylvania, for example. Apparently, Quakers, who were almost exclusively English in ethnic composition, were numerous in present-day Hunterdon and Monmouth counties. However, the available literature seems to suggest that these Quaker settlers had originated in Pennsylvania, not Great Britain.

Regardless, there is significant online information on the early Dutch and Swedish settlers who established and populated the colonies of New Netherland and New Sweden, respectively. As a result, when you search for information on the ethnic composition of settlers in New Jersey during the colonial period, you are able to gather considerable information about the early Dutch and Swedish settlers, but very little on the early English settlers.

Did the English have any noteworthy influence on New Jersey during the colonial period, or did the Dutch have the greatest influence on the culture and history of the colony?

Last edited by Bert_from_back_East; 08-30-2019 at 10:32 AM..
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Old 08-30-2019, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
58,549 posts, read 56,464,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Unfortunately, as I described in my original post, there is seemingly little information on the original English settlers of New Jersey during the colonial period of American history. For example, I am still unclear if a considerable number of English settlers directly immigrated to New Jersey or if they were migrants from nearby areas such as New England and Pennsylvania, for example. Apparently, Quakers, who were almost exclusively English in ethnic composition, were numerous in present-day Hunterdon and Monmouth counties. However, the available literature seems to suggest that these Quaker settlers had originated in Pennsylvania, not Great Britain.

Regardless, there is significant online information on the early Dutch and Swedish settlers who established and populated the colonies of New Netherland and New Sweden, respectively. As a result, when you search for information on the ethnic composition of settlers in New Jersey during the colonial period, you are able to gather considerable information about the early Dutch and Swedish settlers, but very little on the early English settlers.

Did the English have any noteworthy influence on New Jersey during the colonial period, or did the Dutch have the greatest influence on the culture and history of the colony?
I live in a town called "Shrewsbury" that was established in the 17th century. Shrewsbury is a town in England on the Welsh marches.

The county I live in is called "Monmouth", another English name.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monmou...ty,_New_Jersey

Interestingly, the article says that there were also a lot of Scottish immigrants, which I didn't know.

A mile from my house is a pre-Revolutionary-War church, now an Episcopal church, which is what the Church of England became after the DOI when bishops would no longer swear allegiance to the head of the English Church, aka as the King. Among other artifacts, the church boasts a silver communion chalice and paten presented to the church by Queen Anne, obviously prior to the Revolution. (They've also got the original deed from 1702 showing the purchase of the land from the local Lenape tribe.)

The cemetery is full of English names, as is the cemetery of the Quaker Meeting House across the street.

Coming from Bergen County, I was surprised to see how much more "English" than "Dutch" the history in that part of NJ was when I first moved down.
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Old 08-30-2019, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
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Connecticut sent settlers to Northeastern PA in 1754 resulting in the Pennamite–Yankee Wars. The "Yankee Go Home!" signs weren't enough.

https://www.colonialwarsct.org/1769.htm

Salem and Burlington were settled by English Quakers.

"Salem was founded by Quaker John Fenwick in October 1665; the first English settlement established in
West Jersey following the English defeat of the Dutch in 1664 and the first Quaker colony in North America,
predating Philadelphia by seven years."

http://www.njfounders.org/sites/defa...16%20OGDEN.pdf
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