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Old 09-24-2019, 11:34 AM
 
31 posts, read 7,052 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leps12 View Post
Other elephant in the room...if you have children and want to give them a quality education in NYC, even the very best and richest neighborhood, be prepared to bend over and take it deep for private school tuition, while in a decent NJ town, your high property taxes will suffice. And if you have more than one kid? Fugheddaboutit!

I was a product of nyc schools and I'm in a great profession and did well for going to college. Nyc has the specialized high schools that kids who test well can attend.
Is there a higher chance a city kid can fall between the cracks than a suburban NJ kid in a good town? Yes.

NJ has good schools on average but ironically it is harder for kids here to attend top colleges because of the competition.

Talking to parents, they tell me the Indian stay at home tiger moms will ensure their kids place in the top 10% of their high school class and those kids end up in top colleges. Much of the rest of the kids will end up at decent to mediocre schools for college.

Basically our kids are competing amongst ourselves for the same college spots. Once a NJ kid goes to college they tend to excel however because of the competitive experience they had in high school.
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Old 09-24-2019, 11:41 AM
 
31 posts, read 7,052 times
Reputation: 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leps12 View Post
Other elephant in the room...if you have children and want to give them a quality education in NYC, even the very best and richest neighborhood, be prepared to bend over and take it deep for private school tuition, while in a decent NJ town, your high property taxes will suffice. And if you have more than one kid? Fugheddaboutit!

I was a product of nyc schools and I'm in a great profession and did well for going to college. Nyc has the specialized high schools that kids who test well can attend.
Is there a higher chance a city kid can fall between the cracks than a suburban NJ kid in a good town? Yes.

NJ has good schools on average but ironically it is harder for kids here to attend top colleges because of the competition.

Talking to parents, they tell me the Indian stay at home tiger moms will ensure their kids place in the top 10% of their high school class and those kids end up in top colleges. Much of the rest of the kids will end up at decent to mediocre schools for college.

Basically our kids are competing amongst themselves for the same college spots. Once a NJ kid goes to college they tend to excel however because of the competitive experience they had in high school.

Last edited by Slunk; 09-24-2019 at 12:41 PM..
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Old 09-24-2019, 11:44 AM
 
3,141 posts, read 2,379,582 times
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The trick is having that kid know what they want to do while they're in middle school. In some cases it's a difficult ask. I found my path in my second year of college, any NY specialized high school would have been wasted on me.
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Old 09-24-2019, 12:40 PM
 
Location: NJ
4,359 posts, read 9,510,863 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaymoney View Post
The trick is having that kid know what they want to do while they're in middle school. In some cases it's a difficult ask. I found my path in my second year of college, any NY specialized high school would have been wasted on me.
I would say in *most* cases this is a difficult task. How is a 13 year old going to know what they want to do for the rest of their life? At that age they have had very little exposure to any type of job path other than what their parents and other immediate family members do for a living. But once they get to college it is actually quite simple: study math and science. With that background you can do just about anything. When I was in college I didn't know exactly what I wanted to do for a living, but I was great at math and loved science, and that has led me to a great career. It's the kids that graduate with liberal arts degrees that we have to worry about.
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Old 09-24-2019, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Union City, NJ
1,597 posts, read 1,000,011 times
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I sincerely think that unless you're fairly certain that you want a career that requires you to have a college degree (medicine, law, accounting, etc.), it's probably best to get some real life work experience after high school for a few years. A bachelor's degree does little to prepare most people for the work force.
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Old 09-24-2019, 01:08 PM
 
3,141 posts, read 2,379,582 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ansky View Post
It's the kids that graduate with liberal arts degrees that we have to worry about.
That's me, actually. I ended up in a job with a pension where I can't ever be replaced by a robot so every definitive statement has its outliers...

The liberal arts degrees people I know are just fine. They know to be on time, respect others and do the work. They're used to staying up until midnight to hot glue weird things together, so to be paid to do this other thing that gets them out at 6? Sounds fine!
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Old 09-24-2019, 01:37 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,731 posts, read 3,167,455 times
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Interesting that no one in this thread has mentioned ownership of a 2 family home. That added income would go a long way towards offsetting other costs (mortgage, taxes, etc.)
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Old 09-24-2019, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Noth Caccalacca
5,846 posts, read 6,853,970 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaymoney View Post
That's me, actually. I ended up in a job with a pension where I can't ever be replaced by a robot so every definitive statement has its outliers...

The liberal arts degrees people I know are just fine. They know to be on time, respect others and do the work. They're used to staying up until midnight to hot glue weird things together, so to be paid to do this other thing that gets them out at 6? Sounds fine!

Well whatever your major, as long as you're doing a job that you're interested in, people will take notice and you'll reap the economic benefits and job satisfaction that someone who hates what they're doing, will never experience.

But that calls up the whole education complex and property tax issue and how it relates to NJ. Generally, NJ schools rate pretty well on a state education rating system. NJ usually comes in behind Massachusetts, but the cost of that lofty rank is very high. We all know how NJ loves its "home rule" system, but to prop it up, requires boatloads of money. Many states utilize a county school system that saves a fortune in the duplication of jobs and services that a NJ county routinely funds. Imagine only paying for 21 school superintendents rather than ~600 at anywhere from $150,000 to $250,000 a pop!

Getting rid of home rule would be nearly impossible given the mindset of the average NJ school parent. Can you imagine the screams of any parent from say, Maplewood, if their kid got assigned to go to Irvington HS simply because it might be physically closer than Maplewood HS? "I don't want my kid going to "Gangbanger High". "Oh the Horror!!!

New Jersey also never had enough slots for its own college students to go to an in-state public or private school. That's why you'll find NJ college students in nearly every state, in substantial numbers. Also, given the relatively high tuition costs of NJ's public colleges relative to other states, it might be pretty much a wash to send them out of state. Here in North Carolina, you can easily conclude that about a quarter of the out-of-state students at NC-Chapel Hill or Duke are from NJ.

Except for NJ's largest cities, New Jerseyans are grudgingly proud of their school systems -but love to complain about the cost. Here in NC, many teacher jobs go unfilled long into the school year, due to the low pay and chintzy benefits. To a large degree, you do get what you pay for, but the question remains whether NJ pays too much for its "unique" approach to education and the big property tax bill it produces.

Last edited by TheEmissary; 09-24-2019 at 02:20 PM..
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Old 09-24-2019, 02:56 PM
 
446 posts, read 638,910 times
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I seriously doubt that combining schools into county level will result in any substantial savings. If a town has 1,000 homes and the superintendent makes 250,000 then per home savings is $250. Perhaps you can eliminate another 10 posts for a total savings of maybe $2,000 per home. And this is with only 1,000 homes per town assumption.

IMO the reason for high property taxes is because state does not contribute to school costs except for Abott school districts. And of course maybe teachers are paid well in NJ compared to most other states.

Btw, why don't they teach cursive writing anymore in NJ?

Last edited by Shet; 09-24-2019 at 03:20 PM..
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Old 09-24-2019, 03:12 PM
 
3,141 posts, read 2,379,582 times
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They do in Cranford.
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