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Old 08-12-2009, 05:25 AM
 
22 posts, read 71,645 times
Reputation: 19

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We just bought a home with a underground tank had it tested all was fine.Plus the oil company had a optional insurance policy on the tank.To anyone who thinks you cannot get home insurance with a underground tank not true we had no problems at all getting insurance.We are planning on removing the tank to prevent future problems anybody have a # to call about the grant would like to really look into this.
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Old 08-12-2009, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Stewartsville, NJ
7,577 posts, read 19,250,984 times
Reputation: 1242
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomscarpt View Post
We just bought a home with a underground tank had it tested all was fine.Plus the oil company had a optional insurance policy on the tank.To anyone who thinks you cannot get home insurance with a underground tank not true we had no problems at all getting insurance.We are planning on removing the tank to prevent future problems anybody have a # to call about the grant would like to really look into this.
If you have tank protection thru your oil compnay, read it carefully! There's a voluntary pull clause. The grant program is thru the NJEDA. You can find the information by going to their website www.njeda.com under financial assistance - PUST program.
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Old 08-12-2009, 09:23 AM
 
74 posts, read 388,101 times
Reputation: 52
[SIZE=3]The following are the contact information:[/SIZE]
[SIZE=3]Phone is 609-777-4898[/SIZE]
[SIZE=3]Email: Tanks@njeda.com[/SIZE]
[SIZE=3]Website: www.njeda.com[/SIZE]
[SIZE=3]You can also contact companies that will help you fill out the application and pre-approve you.[/SIZE]
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Old 08-12-2009, 01:54 PM
 
74 posts, read 388,101 times
Reputation: 52
In my experience when we help file the grant paperwork the grants appear to be handled quicker. The reason is it avoids a lot of back and forth with the NJDEA because the application was not completed correctly. Each time they send it back the clock starts again. Avoid the hassle and use a company to help you complete the application and manage the entire job.
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Old 09-03-2009, 10:59 AM
dla
 
1 posts, read 5,774 times
Reputation: 10
How do you convince a seller to deal with their oil tank? We are in the process of buying a house that has an underground oil tank (decommissioned in 1992), but the paperwork that the seller provided is not satisfactory (it is not "official" in any sense -- a handwritten form with no address and a couple of business cards). Even the town does not have satisfactory records (just a permit stating that a new gas furnace and heating system were installed correctly, but nothing about the oil tank). The seller feels that this paperwork is good enough. She does not want to pay for testing (and would never agree to or pay for the oil tank to be removed). How can we have her understand that she will *need* to deal with the oil tank at some point -- whether with us or another buyer -- if she wants to sell the house? Is there some sort of law or legal regulation we can point her to?
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Old 09-03-2009, 11:30 AM
 
1,536 posts, read 3,884,810 times
Reputation: 451
You can't convince a seller of the need to remove the tank if they're a stubborn fool. The facts are out there (just run some Google searches on problems with underground oil tanks) and the only thing you can do is to look out for youself and NEVER buy a house with an old, unused oil tank in the ground.
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Old 09-08-2009, 02:59 PM
 
74 posts, read 388,101 times
Reputation: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by dla View Post
How do you convince a seller to deal with their oil tank? We are in the process of buying a house that has an underground oil tank (decommissioned in 1992), but the paperwork that the seller provided is not satisfactory (it is not "official" in any sense -- a handwritten form with no address and a couple of business cards). Even the town does not have satisfactory records (just a permit stating that a new gas furnace and heating system were installed correctly, but nothing about the oil tank). The seller feels that this paperwork is good enough. She does not want to pay for testing (and would never agree to or pay for the oil tank to be removed). How can we have her understand that she will *need* to deal with the oil tank at some point -- whether with us or another buyer -- if she wants to sell the house? Is there some sort of law or legal regulation we can point her to?
If the seller refuses to remove the tank you must have soil testing performed within the tank area. The soil testing must at a minimum consist of at least 4 soil extractions at a depth of the bottom of the tank. The soil must go to a laboratory for analysis. If the laboratory report shows fuel oil contamination it is reported to the state and the current owner of the property is responsible for the clean-up. If the soil comes back within an acceptable range and the property is in New Jersey you can apply for grant money of $1200. The grant should be adequate to pay for all or most of the cost for removal. You can apply on-line or hire a company to file the grant paperwork.
[SIZE=3] [/SIZE]
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Old 09-12-2009, 02:15 AM
D
 
14 posts, read 30,478 times
Reputation: 11
I don't think that the seller can sell you the house without taking care of the oil tank removal, or pumping it out, and remedy if needed. Inspection should tell you. Yes, there is a program, but it is for seller. I have old oil tank, and I would need to have it removed, pumped out...filled with sand. I think. That's what I've heard, but can't sell without doing something.
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Old 09-12-2009, 12:24 PM
 
74 posts, read 388,101 times
Reputation: 52
Some towns in New Jersey do require the current owner to close or remove "not in use" underground tank before they sell the property. The current owner is eligible to receive the NJ grant money of up to $1200 for the removal or closure of the tank. If the current owner refuses to remove or close the tank than it is critical that you have soil testing performed around the tank. The soil should be taken 0-6 inches below the base of the tank and a minimum of 4 soil samples should be extracted, one from each side of the tank. When hiring an inspection company to do the soil extractions make sure they send the samples to a certified laboratory for analysis. Do not accept on site soil evaluation with a hand held meter. When hiring the company to do the soil evaluation identify that you are going to close or remove the tank. If you plan to leave the tank and fill it in place with sand you should have each of the 4 samples separately analyzed. If the tank is to come out of the ground then the samples can go to the laboratory as one sample. Many people when leaving the tank in place make the mistake of having only one or no samples going to the laboratory for analysis. Many contractors offer a lower price to fill the tank with sand and say if there are holes they will see them when they cut the tank open and clean the inside. The real fact is many times you cannot see pin holes against the dark soil that surrounds the tank. In my experience when we are retained to do soil testing years later around a tank that was filled in place and even had the town sign-off that it was done correctly, we find at least 35% of those have contaminated soil. Don't be fooled that it is cheaper to fill with sand, always, where possible have the tank removed. If removal is not possible get at least 4 independent soil analyses which will make the cost the same or more than a removal. As soon as you take title and have the work done to remove or close the tank you can apply for the grant money which should cover most of the cost.
[SIZE=3] [/SIZE]
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Old 09-12-2009, 03:14 PM
 
2,312 posts, read 6,269,021 times
Reputation: 871
We bought a house with an underground oil tank that was in use. We tested the soil. Fine. Three years later we sell the house. They test the soil. Leak. Nightmare!!

Get rid of your underground oil tanks, people!!! They should be illegal by now.
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