U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Jersey
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 03-30-2009, 08:32 AM
 
Location: South Orange, NJ
825 posts, read 1,855,970 times
Reputation: 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by magggmom View Post
We moved from MA last year to Ridgewood- we were told it was the best- schools, houses, downtown, etc. After a year, we're not really happy with the intensity of the parents, and pressure in the schools- lots of pressure to perform. We're considering leaving town and looking at Ramsey, Allendale and Oradell. Any thoughts on these towns compared to Ridgewood - specifically the overall "mood" of the town-are the schools high pressure? Sports the same? Are people welcoming to new families? Or is all of Bergen pretty much the same?
You're looking to move into some pretty nice areas where the pressure will be the same. If you want less of a competitive or a less "pressured" lifestyle, as you put it, try heading further South. Maybe even consider leaving Bergen county. I have family in Bergen, but I've never actually lived there, so my experience is minimal. And of course I wouldn't know about the "moods" of the towns, since the only people I know from there are my own relatives.

But I do know this:

People who were born and raised in bergen county love it. People who move into it tend to get dragged down by the fast-paced lifestyle that Bergen county provides. It's insane there. It's really almost impossible to find a down-to-earth community. Northen Bergen county is very wealthy, whereas the southern part of the county tends to be a little bit more middle/working class. Regardless of wealth, practically the whole county is sprawling with different state highways. In fact there was just another thread about two state highways (Route 4 and Route17) in Bergen County which are both pretty crazy to drive on, especially during rush hour. Route 4, Route 17, 46, I-80, and the turnpike are all insane. A lot of out-of-staters and non-north jerseyans can't handle it. I assume you drive a lot, so of course the roads are a part of your lifestyle. I'm sure the pressure of everything is overwhelming.

If you're really interested, I could probably list some towns a little bit further south that have a lot of the good stuff that Ridgewood has to offer. Just let me know.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-14-2012, 11:41 PM
 
3 posts, read 1,604 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by ira View Post
This is interesting. With all the "intensity" in schools and the "Harvard" factor, VERY few Ridgewood grads end up going to Ivy League schools. Last year's graduating class had 20-smth% going to Bergen Community College.
This upsets me dearly; here is why. Your statements are not factually acurate, nor do they consider the students who got into an Ivy Leaguage school but decided to attend a sister school. Let me explain further, after all, I speak from experience.

I grew up in and attended Ridgewood schooling for my entire primary and secondary education (e.g. Elementary through High School); it was brilliant. We had comprehensive programs from phy Ed to Music. I still remember how to play the violin, and my Spanish is better than most native speakers. Did you know that the 13 Ivies continue to reward the top 13 students with 'Book Awards'? My brother received his from Dartmouth. He ended up at Colgate University, and is an MD finishing his oncology fellowship at MD Anderson in Houston, TX after his residency at Sloan Kettering. Which leads me to my second point, attending a school that is equally good but not Ivy. Stephan was accepted to Cornell, NYU (safety), and Dartmouth, but Colgate essentially paid for him to be there; simply put, they made him an offer he could not refuse. Same goes for me. I am a CFE with one of the Big Four, going year 8. (Colgate, I should mention, is ranked in the same leaguage as the Ivies - Liberal Arts, and ranks in the top 10 percent according the US News.)

I am not saying that it was not demanding because it was, but such is life, better the practice at a younger so that it is engrained later in life. My boss once asked me what the difference was between speed and velocity, and I was able to recite to him not only the definition but the formula as well. Everyone listening was impressed, even he. That answer was the result of my Ridgewood education, AP Physics, Dr. Nelson would be proud.

Furthermore, I would like to remark on the BCC comment. Twenty percent of all graduates is not half bad, (roughly 80 students of 400. How does this number compare with other towns?) Especially since the number of enrollments is most likely skewed by the School-fusion initiative:

Ridgewood High School - Science Overview

Last edited by Class of 1999; 03-15-2012 at 12:03 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2012, 08:29 AM
 
26,170 posts, read 18,648,352 times
Reputation: 23307
Quote:
Originally Posted by Class of 1999 View Post
This upsets me dearly; here is why. Your statements are not factually acurate, nor do they consider the students who got into an Ivy Leaguage school but decided to attend a sister school. Let me explain further, after all, I speak from experience.

I grew up in and attended Ridgewood schooling for my entire primary and secondary education (e.g. Elementary through High School); it was brilliant. We had comprehensive programs from phy Ed to Music. I still remember how to play the violin, and my Spanish is better than most native speakers. Did you know that the 13 Ivies continue to reward the top 13 students with 'Book Awards'? My brother received his from Dartmouth. He ended up at Colgate University, and is an MD finishing his oncology fellowship at MD Anderson in Houston, TX after his residency at Sloan Kettering. Which leads me to my second point, attending a school that is equally good but not Ivy. Stephan was accepted to Cornell, NYU (safety), and Dartmouth, but Colgate essentially paid for him to be there; simply put, they made him an offer he could not refuse. Same goes for me. I am a CFE with one of the Big Four, going year 8. (Colgate, I should mention, is ranked in the same leaguage as the Ivies - Liberal Arts, and ranks in the top 10 percent according the US News.)

I am not saying that it was not demanding because it was, but such is life, better the practice at a younger so that it is engrained later in life. My boss once asked me what the difference was between speed and velocity, and I was able to recite to him not only the definition but the formula as well. Everyone listening was impressed, even he. That answer was the result of my Ridgewood education, AP Physics, Dr. Nelson would be proud.

Furthermore, I would like to remark on the BCC comment. Twenty percent of all graduates is not half bad, (roughly 80 students of 400. How does this number compare with other towns?) Especially since the number of enrollments is most likely skewed by the School-fusion initiative:

Ridgewood High School - Science Overview

However, this top-notch Ridgewood education didn't help you in remembering to check dates so that you wouldn't respond to a three-and-a-half-year-old post.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2012, 11:03 AM
 
34 posts, read 118,081 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
However, this top-notch Ridgewood education didn't help you in remembering to check dates so that you wouldn't respond to a three-and-a-half-year-old post.
So what? The response is to the stats, not to the request for help.
I have to agree with Class of 1999. I am also a product of the Ridgewood educational system, albeit quite a few years back; and so are my children. I have always been commended on my ability to write coherently, my grammar, my ability to think abstractly, my general knowledge and my ability to recite facts that seemed useless to me at the time but ended up coming in pretty darn handy years later. Ridgewood schools did a good job on me.

I think the trend toward Bergen Community is a sign of the economy more than anything else. The recession hit northern Bergen County hard; so many parents lost jobs or took cuts in pay. Those of us who had children starting college in this economy were told that one of the best ways to save some money was to send the kids to BCC for one or two years and then have them transfer to a 4 year college. One of my three kids went to BCC for two years, and let me tell you... the classes she took were not easy! I admit to telling her than her Bergen courses would probably be easier than her high school classes were, but I was wrong. I was impressed by what I saw at Bergen, at least in the classes she took.

As far as the "snob" remarks about Ridgewood (yes, I know it was an old post; I am just not here very often) I do agree there is a snob factor here. Many of us are not anything like that but you have to look hard to find us, because we are less likely to be front and center, bragging, complaining, or posing for pictures in the Society pages. The towns that are economically similar are similarly snobby (and that includes Wyckoff.) I just found my friends among the non-snobs and encouraged my kids to do the same. It's easier to do that if you are on the east side...
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2012, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Bergen County, NJ
635 posts, read 696,800 times
Reputation: 327
Quote:
Originally Posted by LynW676 View Post
Oops, I meant to say that I agreed with Classof1999. Maybe the Ridgewood schools didn't do as good a job as I thought....
hehe, glad you corrected that

BTW, did your daughter end up transferring to a 4 yr school after all? if so, which school? just curious.

Snobs are everywhere, trust me. One can choose to play into this behavior or ignore it. Ridgewood is plenty big and there are also many folks there driving Hondas, so not everyone drinks the kool aid. To each his own but overall I think it's a great town.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2012, 11:34 AM
 
34 posts, read 118,081 times
Reputation: 30
She ended up choosing not to transfer. She found a job she liked with her associates degree and is now very happy and successful in her career.
But she knew a number of classmates who went to BCC when she did and who did transfer...perhaps not to Ivy League schools but to good ones. Rutgers and Lehigh are two that come to mind.
Another thing I noticed with my own kids' Ridgewood classmates is that many who go to the most competitive colleges end up transferring and coming home to attend state schools. It makes me sad to think that we are putting so much pressure on these kids to attend schools that are way too much for them.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2012, 11:55 AM
 
26,170 posts, read 18,648,352 times
Reputation: 23307
Quote:
Originally Posted by LynW676 View Post
So what? The response is to the stats, not to the request for help.
I have to agree with Class of 1999. I am also a product of the Ridgewood educational system, albeit quite a few years back; and so are my children. I have always been commended on my ability to write coherently, my grammar, my ability to think abstractly, my general knowledge and my ability to recite facts that seemed useless to me at the time but ended up coming in pretty darn handy years later. Ridgewood schools did a good job on me.

I think the trend toward Bergen Community is a sign of the economy more than anything else. The recession hit northern Bergen County hard; so many parents lost jobs or took cuts in pay. Those of us who had children starting college in this economy were told that one of the best ways to save some money was to send the kids to BCC for one or two years and then have them transfer to a 4 year college. One of my three kids went to BCC for two years, and let me tell you... the classes she took were not easy! I admit to telling her than her Bergen courses would probably be easier than her high school classes were, but I was wrong. I was impressed by what I saw at Bergen, at least in the classes she took.

As far as the "snob" remarks about Ridgewood (yes, I know it was an old post; I am just not here very often) I do agree there is a snob factor here. Many of us are not anything like that but you have to look hard to find us, because we are less likely to be front and center, bragging, complaining, or posing for pictures in the Society pages. The towns that are economically similar are similarly snobby (and that includes Wyckoff.) I just found my friends among the non-snobs and encouraged my kids to do the same. It's easier to do that if you are on the east side...
"Class of 1999" was specifically addressing a poster with "Your statement", etc. I grew up in Midland Park a/k/a "Ridgewood Lite", where we are not only smart, but we have a sense of humor. Born at Valley when it was a lot smaller than it is now and returned there 33 years later, like a salmon, to give birth.

I've met a lot of great people from Ridgewood over the years. The "snob" factor is one of those stereotypes that applies to a few and then the rest get tagged with it. That's how stereotypes work, alas.

And I agree 100% that BCC is a pretty good school. It's definitely a sign of the economy, plus the NJ Stars program offers free schooling there for kids with certain GPAs. My daughter was offered the scholarship but she is going somewhere else. However, at that time (she graduated from HS in 2009) there were a number of articles about how the local colleges, including the community colleges and and state schools, were packed to the brim because of the economy. BCC is bigger in student population than a lot of four-year schools.

My sister went back to BCC as an adult and did very well--she got her Associates there and then moved on to NJIT full-time and they took all her credits, I believe.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2012, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Vermont
4,553 posts, read 8,310,800 times
Reputation: 1769
Haha

This has me curious
I was class of 99 at RHS I think (I have blocked out most memories of high school)
and I had Dr Nelson, but pretty sure I got a D in his class.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2012, 12:11 PM
 
34 posts, read 118,081 times
Reputation: 30
[quote=Mightyqueen801;23419186]"Class of 1999" was specifically addressing a poster with "Your statement", etc. I grew up in Midland Park a/k/a "Ridgewood Lite", where we are not only smart, but we have a sense of humor.quote]

I apologize for not catching the humor.... it's sometimes hard when reading rather than hearing a remark. I thought you were being snarky but clearly I misinterpreted. My bad!
I actually enjoy it when some of the old threads are revived. I am sure even the old topics are of interest to some newer readers.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2012, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Bergen County, NJ
635 posts, read 696,800 times
Reputation: 327
Quote:
Originally Posted by LynW676 View Post
She ended up choosing not to transfer. She found a job she liked with her associates degree and is now very happy and successful in her career.
But she knew a number of classmates who went to BCC when she did and who did transfer...perhaps not to Ivy League schools but to good ones. Rutgers and Lehigh are two that come to mind.
Another thing I noticed with my own kids' Ridgewood classmates is that many who go to the most competitive colleges end up transferring and coming home to attend state schools. It makes me sad to think that we are putting so much pressure on these kids to attend schools that are way too much for them.
Too much for them, as in too much money? or too intense as far as education? Most of these kids, as you've stated, have been prepped all their lives to attend top schools, so academically I'm sure most can hack it. However, there are so many financial pressures and some peer pressures as well. I didn't attend an Ivy league school but I did attend an excellent private school. Many of my peers were the kids of executives and had access to money, opportunity and lifestyle that I couldn't relate. Some kids, unless they can become an active player/participant in these cliques, would just rather go somewhere else where the environment is not a burden. Where they can also be the bigger fish in the pond.
Then you have the financial responsibility of a parent who didn't have the proper reflection on what they could really afford. A $50k a year education, requires about a $90k income. With multiple kids adding to that bill it just becomes overwhelming. I imagine this is more likely the scenario of why these kids have come back to state schools.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $79,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Jersey
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top