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Old 08-18-2011, 08:44 AM
 
Location: South Jersey
819 posts, read 2,725,999 times
Reputation: 1434

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Selective Service System: Welcome

I was wondering if this still a law and apparently it is.

If you are a man ages 18 through 25 and living in the U.S., then you must register with Selective Service. Itís the law. According to law, a man must register with Selective Service within 30 days of his 18th birthday. Selective Service will accept late registrations but not after a man has reached age 26. You may be denied benefits or a job if you have not registered. You can register at any U.S. Post Office and do not need a social security number. When you do obtain a social security number, let Selective Service know. Provide a copy of your new social security number card; being sure to include your complete name, date of birth, Selective Service registration number, and current mailing address; and mail to the Selective Service System, P.O. Box 94636, Palatine, IL 60094-4636

 
Old 08-18-2011, 08:52 AM
 
Location: South Jersey
819 posts, read 2,725,999 times
Reputation: 1434
Quote:
Originally Posted by mongooz24 View Post
I am in a similar boat. I didn't find out about SS requirement until I was 38 years old and applying for financial aid to finish my bachelor's. I was completely mystified by this because my father is a 35-year Air Force Veteran and civil servant and my mother was also a civil servant at the time I turned 18. When I asked them about it, they said they were not aware it was required. THIS IS COMING FROM TWO HIGH-LEVEL MILITARY PERSONNEL. I think the comment that the gentleman "Jerseyt719" made about not being aware was highly offensive and shows great ignorance. Since I found out about, I have quizzed several men in grocery stores, gas stations, wherever. About half of them know and others do not. Many times it depends on your circumstances. I recently found out why my father didn't think it was required. Apparently, between 1975 and 1980, it was not a requirement. My brothers turned 18 in 1977 and 1979. That's why my dad didn't think it was required for me in 1989, he didn't know the law had changed yet again in 1980. I did not grow up in a ghetto and neither did many other people who do not know about this obligation. Plus, what is the point of avoiding a draft for which there is no war to worry about? In 1989, the only talk of war was Iraq, Desert Storm...a military that was taken and over in a blink of an eye. I think this is just an excuse for people to come down on those who grow up different than the "norm".
Per the website- they say the following about not signing up in time:

WHAT CAN YOU DO IF YOU DID NOT REGISTER AND ARE NOW 26 OR OLDER? If you have passed your 26th birthday and are now being denied eligibility for Federal student financial aid, Federal job training, or Federal employment, or are having difficulty obtaining U.S. citizenship because you failed to register, you have the the following recourse available to you: Explain to the official handling your case (for example, a student financial aid officer) the reasons for your failure to register with Selective Service. A non-registrant may not be denied any benefit if he can "show by a preponderance of evidence" that his failure to register was not knowing and willful. Offer as much evidence supporting your case, and as much detail, as possible.
 
Old 08-18-2011, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Durham
840 posts, read 3,005,511 times
Reputation: 631
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdotAllen View Post
Per the website- they say the following about not signing up in time:

WHAT CAN YOU DO IF YOU DID NOT REGISTER AND ARE NOW 26 OR OLDER? If you have passed your 26th birthday and are now being denied eligibility for Federal student financial aid, Federal job training, or Federal employment, or are having difficulty obtaining U.S. citizenship because you failed to register, you have the the following recourse available to you: Explain to the official handling your case (for example, a student financial aid officer) the reasons for your failure to register with Selective Service. A non-registrant may not be denied any benefit if he can "show by a preponderance of evidence" that his failure to register was not knowing and willful. Offer as much evidence supporting your case, and as much detail, as possible.
My husband had to write a letter of explanation to the school counselor what his situation was and he was able to get the financial aid. It is completely up to the school. Every time he applies for the FAFSA to register for the next semester, his name is flagged and he has to repeat the process (not writing the letter, but meeting with his counselor).
 
Old 08-19-2011, 10:30 PM
 
39 posts, read 111,563 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by mia78 View Post
I've heard that reason, but unfortunately 'kind of knowing' cannot be documented.
I just checked my selective service registration (you can check through the website by entering your name and SS) and it looks like I was signed up when I graduated HS autmatically. I do not recall doing it myself
 
Old 08-20-2011, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania & New Jersey
1,476 posts, read 3,349,194 times
Reputation: 1564
Mia, what is your background? I know this thread has been focused on your dh yet I'm curious. Your writing skills are way above average... not something I'd expect in a thread where a focal point is about growing up in the ghetto.

I have compassion for your husband's circumstance. On occasion, I do volunteer work with urban youth and I understand how someone in the hood could really not 'know' that they're required to register for Selective Service. Instead of focusing on that 'failure' to register, I'd rather focus on the fact that this man has been able to rise above his upbringing and achieve a better life for himself as an adult.
 
Old 08-20-2011, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Durham
840 posts, read 3,005,511 times
Reputation: 631
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaverickDD View Post
Mia, what is your background? I know this thread has been focused on your dh yet I'm curious. Your writing skills are way above average... not something I'd expect in a thread where a focal point is about growing up in the ghetto.

I have compassion for your husband's circumstance. On occasion, I do volunteer work with urban youth and I understand how someone in the hood could really not 'know' that they're required to register for Selective Service. Instead of focusing on that 'failure' to register, I'd rather focus on the fact that this man has been able to rise above his upbringing and achieve a better life for himself as an adult.
Thank you so much for the compliment. I actually am a freelance writer by trade. I guess I can attribute my skills to the education received from the Baltimore City Public Schools. Being from that city, I'm definitely familiar with the trials of the ghetto life however, I didn't grow up in that environment. I grew up in a decent neighborhood, with a somewhat average middle class two parent family (still married) who were very much involved in my life. I was surrounded by the majority of families in a similar situation. My life growing up was the polar opposite of my husband.

I also agree that my focus is on supporting my husband's ability to rise above his upbringing and focus on providing a better situation for his family. I am still amazed at the difference in outlook on life when comparing him and myself. I didn't realize how strong an impact upbringing could have on someone's future until I married him. It has taken him a very long time to realize the importance of getting an education with a resulting marketable skill (thus him starting higher education for the first time in his late 30's). This is something that many people from middle and upper class families (including myself) are indoctrinated with at a young age and take for granted thinking that everyone else would automatically share the same goals.
 
Old 09-06-2012, 11:03 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,479 times
Reputation: 10
I have had about enough as well - but with you; I take your comment as a personal attack, as I find myself in the very same position as the male the original poster is refering to.

I left high school in the ninth grade, due to bullying by both teachers and students. my parents were never home and I was hospitalized twice for depression. my father took me to get both my driver's license and my first voters registration at the age of 18 - and I distinctly remember being taken to a post office for selective service as well. But, as luck would have it, he died shortly after, and both my mother and I have been under the impression since that time, 16 years ago, that I was registered with the selective service. The thing that I take as a personal attack is your comment about being a draft dodger - this if funny to me as even without selective service, I have been called to Jury Duty several times and served on both petit and grand juries - we were told by the judge each and every time that this was one of the greatest duties a citizen of this country could perform, and I did so without complaint and without having reliable transportation or even a job / money, and certainly the state never questioned my status when it came to summoning me or when it came time for jury selection; It is strange to me how this state can call me to a serve as a juror on multiple occasions, and actually choose me serve on the jury itself, yet I am disinherited when it comes to any sort of finacial aid should I wish to pursue a better life.

It seems a bit hypocritical, actually. And naturally someone like you comes along who likely has never had a bad day in your life, who has a job and lots of money and no worry about starving to death on the street - and here I'd bet you that you'd apply to welfare if you were in a need that dire. Try starving and being too proud to apply, like me. But of course, I'm a draft dodger, right? Because I don't take anything, because I never asked for anything, because this state sees fit to call me to serve as a juror with some regularity every couple of years, and yet I don't get a thing, I have no recourse at all and am not permitted any sort of financial aid?

And, it is always easy for someone to cast these silly little judgments on another person's plight, as you are, when they are on the good and sunny side of it all - It's okay though, because I am equally certain that it will all come back to you, and you will be just as casually disregarded and discredited the very MOMENT you think something unfair has happened to you.

Get into a car accident? You shouldn't have been driving so fast. Get cancer? Maybe you should have taken better care of yourself. Your wife got hit by a car? Maybe you should have been holding her hand - maybe she should have been paying better attention.

See how easy it is to play your little game?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerseyt719 View Post
Ok, about had enough at this point. The fact that he didn't register because "he didn't know" just doesn't fly. I'm sorry, but this is the equivalent of draft dodgers in my opinion.

I am absolutely certain he heard about this at some point in his life. I know, I know, he grew up on the streets of Newark. Did he ever hear about the riots there?? I'm sure he heard about soldiers then. There were just big pieces in the papers on the riots reliving the history too.

Hmmmm, never heard about the Vietnam War and the draft? How about people joining the military?? They never heard of that either? Never?? Newark doesn't know anything about these things?? Sorry, don't believe this.

You are coming up with every excuse in the world that he didn't know about this and it's not flying with me. I'm sure you don't care and I really don't blame you for not caring what a stranger thinks. But it's been stewing with me.
Now he wants some type of help and he can't get it because he didn't fulfill his obligation as an American. Well, you know what, I think it's great that they require you to do what you are supposed to do in order to get help. That is akin to wanting any other type of assistance and not doing what you are supposed to do to get it.
Yet, I'm sure on the streets of Newark, everyone knew what they had to do to get their welfare check....
Take out loans...
 
Old 09-07-2012, 04:03 PM
 
Location: NJ
328 posts, read 883,330 times
Reputation: 169
Why do people register on this board and pull up zombie threads just to argue?
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