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Old 03-01-2009, 04:12 PM
 
Location: NJ
383 posts, read 465,332 times
Reputation: 178
I saw a house today that had either:

1) half height basement

or

2) tall crawl space

It was very weird. It reminded me of the movie Being John Malkovic.

In any case, it was better than no basement.
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Old 03-01-2009, 05:00 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,395 posts, read 1,962,476 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nutleynut View Post
You will not be able to put in hardwood over the slab. that application calls for an engineered wood floor product. This is basically some moisture resistant plywood with a veneer.
well, with enough $$, anything is doable.

if you put a moisture barrier between the slab & the rough floor material, then the hardwood on top of that, it's going to be fine.
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Old 03-01-2009, 05:04 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,395 posts, read 1,962,476 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MoorestownResident View Post
No, it's not a big drawback, it is a HUGE drawback. People want/need a basement, resale will be tougher, the house will be very cold. You'll have higher utility bills and hear the noise from the furnace. I wouldn't do it.
that's a completely subjective viewpoint.

hundreds of thousands (if not millions) of people live in bi-levels, or other style homes with no basement per se.

it's all a matter of how you think of it -- in a bi-level, the ground floor is essentially the basement. how on earth some of you can imply that a below ground level basement will not be colder than a ground floor is beyond me.
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Old 03-01-2009, 06:44 PM
 
1,786 posts, read 2,455,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xmonger View Post
I saw a house today that had either:

1) half height basement

or

2) tall crawl space

It was very weird. It reminded me of the movie Being John Malkovic.

In any case, it was better than no basement.

Partial basements or tall crawl spaces are sometimes called "yankee basements."
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Old 03-01-2009, 08:11 PM
 
89 posts, read 138,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nutleynut View Post
You will not be able to put in hardwood over the slab. that application calls for an engineered wood floor product. This is basically some moisture resistant plywood with a veneer.
Good to know. I really liked hardwood floor. I think we'll pass this one.
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Old 03-01-2009, 10:18 PM
 
329 posts, read 1,033,779 times
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no, you can check with experts. that may not be true with baseboard heating. in the olden days they used radiant heating for over slab homes. modern ones uses baseboard. check this out.


Quote:
With traditional baseboard heat, water leaves the boiler at approximately 180F to 200F and is sent through pipes throughout the house via a pump or circulator
Heating With Water


you will see them running on sides of the house , neatly covered and under the hardwood floors.


So perhaps you must now find out if baseboard heating is better or duct heat?
They say baseboard is better because of less allergens and mold and bacteria in the air supply.
I haven't lived long in this country so cannot answer that
Note Air Condition ducts can be separate than heat. So people have an option not to turn on AC if they are allergic too.

Personally I did checked out a small (3ft) basement for storage with crawl space and natural hardwood floors...and I think that
its not bad because it could serve as storage as well as air cushion so no problem of floor being too cold during winter.
I mean the whole concept of slab is so that house don't look like mansions and palaces with stone accent and all that bells and whistles, and therefore that keeps
the cost down. I saw one such basement fancy home (4br) and same square footage, and it had 2 pairs of heater, boiler, ac...Jeez ...double the utility bill I suppose.


Ofcourse slabs has limits too. But I think 4 bed room weight (which a slab very much supports) should suffice for a starter family .

Also another thing to look at is that these days with new foundation, repairs are much easier than it used to be in the past.
In the past I hear, they use to dug out concrete to get to the copper pipes, but with new foundation its a breeze.


*added later at 1am:
I would be interested in the placement of boiler. God forbid it fails, then with basement only basement needs to be dried the bed rooms or living space is untouched.
thats an advantage of having a basement. the other advantage is you can rent it out to empty nesters

Last edited by lets_hope_for_newbruns; 03-01-2009 at 11:03 PM..
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Old 03-01-2009, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Martinsville, NJ
5,847 posts, read 6,348,856 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JG183 View Post
that's a completely subjective viewpoint.

hundreds of thousands (if not millions) of people live in bi-levels, or other style homes with no basement per se.

it's all a matter of how you think of it -- in a bi-level, the ground floor is essentially the basement. how on earth some of you can imply that a below ground level basement will not be colder than a ground floor is beyond me.
I won't imply that. I'll come out & say it. A below grade level will generally be LESS COLD in the winter than an above ground level. The earth is a gigantic mass, and is less subject to variations in temperature than the air in which we all walk around every day. Once you get below aq certain depth, like three or four feet, the earth is a fairly constant temperature all year long. That effect translates to the below grade rooms. Basements are typically warmer in winter and cooler in summer than above grade rooms.
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Old 03-02-2009, 05:23 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,395 posts, read 1,962,476 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Keegan View Post
I won't imply that. I'll come out & say it. A below grade level will generally be LESS COLD in the winter than an above ground level. The earth is a gigantic mass, and is less subject to variations in temperature than the air in which we all walk around every day. Once you get below aq certain depth, like three or four feet, the earth is a fairly constant temperature all year long. That effect translates to the below grade rooms. Basements are typically warmer in winter and cooler in summer than above grade rooms.
I think that's oversimplifying things, from the standpoint of not knowing the construction of the basement (poured cement ? cement blocks ? spans the entire footprint of the house ?) to the routing of the plumbing.

if you've never had a basement, you won't miss it. I had one for a long time, and am glad to be rid of the maintenance to ward off smells & mold. the bi-level I'm in now has more storage space in the attic than my old basement did...
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Old 03-02-2009, 05:57 AM
 
1,308 posts, read 2,083,762 times
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I agree that the average person wants/expects a basement mainly for extra space (storage). Or a possible finishable space for a playroom or extra living space.

I personally would love to NOT have basements in NJ. Mainly for water issues. SUCH A PAIN!
Dealt with them and it just adds a new level of suck to home ownership when things go bad.

Now if no basement then you NEED a walk up attic space or a large garage to counter the lack of storage space.
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Old 03-02-2009, 06:04 AM
 
179 posts, read 482,222 times
Reputation: 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoorestownResident View Post
No, it's not a big drawback, it is a HUGE drawback. People want/need a basement, resale will be tougher, the house will be very cold. You'll have higher utility bills and hear the noise from the furnace. I wouldn't do it.
I live in a house w/o a basement and none of the above apply! A lot of folks, me included, do not NEED a basement. A family room or good sized LR suffice. Why is a house "very cold" because there is no basement? Does not make sense! "You'll have higher utility bills", no the exact opposite is true. The furnace is on the same level any escaping heat seeps into the living area.
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