U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Mexico
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 04-15-2012, 12:28 AM
 
938 posts, read 1,269,807 times
Reputation: 533

Advertisements

I am not really proposing a detailed personal set of criteria. I just wanted to know what other think qualify as strong examples of diamonds in the rough. I assume a diamond in the rough would meet several typical criteria (i.e., interesting enough, have enough services, jobs, etc.) beyond physical attractiveness. It is true I moved from the simple criteria of prettiest towns to something more complicated but I also find the complicated question more interesting. Maybe that it shifting the thread too much.

I was thinking of New Mexico but also beyond New Mexico. In New Mexico the candidates I was thinking about were Ruidoso, Silver City, Aztec, Socorro, Alamogordo/Tulorosa and Los Alamos.

Possible candidates in other states:

WA- Cheney, Camas, Ellensburg, Walla Walla, Lewiston
OR- Silverton, Grants Pass, LaGrande, Baker, Pendleton, Redmond
ID- Moscow, Weiser, Mt Home, Twin Falls, Pocatello, Salmon
UT- Cedar City, Payson, Vernal
MT- Helena, Dillon, Lewiston
WY- Sheridan, Douglas, Laramie, Riverton, Evanston
AZ- Williams, Camp Verde, Payson, Eagar/Springerville
CO- Delta, Montrose, Craig, Alamosa, Trinidad, Rifle
CA- Yreka, Susanville, Carson City, Minden/Gardnerville

Which of these are considered diamonds in the rough, which are not there yet, and which are already past this perhaps "ideal" stage in the eyes of others? Obviously the answers will vary by person and their criteria. Perhaps I missed some candidates. I am just mildly curious what is considered "about right", or even "near perfect", if some cities are overdone. (And I don't disagree that there are cities and towns that are overdone but they are pretty easy to spot and avoid if overly precious and expensive is something you want to avoid.)

I

Last edited by NW Crow; 04-15-2012 at 12:37 AM..
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-15-2012, 12:36 AM
 
Location: Under Mount Doom
9,247 posts, read 6,107,249 times
Reputation: 4746
Quote:
Originally Posted by NW Crow View Post
It is pretty easy shooting to knock down the most famous pretty / expensive towns and cities for being overdone and too precious. All commentary is acceptable but I find that critique pretty boring and overdone.

What are the best diamonds in the rough in the west over 5,000 population, over 25,000 and are there any over 50-100,000 in the opinion of those reading? I may share a few but I wanted to ask the opinion of others first. Which would you actually move to? Which are interesting enough, have enough services and jobs but haven't become too precious?
Fair enough. Trashing the Taoses, Jacksons, and Aspens is easy. So, what are some decent towns of middle size and with considerable appeal and not too much preciousness?

Las Vegas, NM (not for everyone)
Las Cruces, NM
Alamogordo, NM
Silver City, NM
Flagstaff, AZ
Medford, OR
Logan, UT
Moscow, ID
Helena, MT
Laramie, WY
Corvallis, OR
Chico, CA
Fort Collins, CO
Cedar City, UT
Idaho Falls, ID
La Grande and Baker City, OR
Ellensburg, WA
Eureka, CA
Klamath Falls, OR

Just a start....
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2012, 12:52 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
17,640 posts, read 19,027,454 times
Reputation: 20273
A reminder.

This is the New Mexico forum....


And it will stay New Mexico related...

There is a separate City vs City forum:
City vs. City

Last edited by Poncho_NM; 04-15-2012 at 01:38 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2012, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Nuevo México
1,820 posts, read 2,201,714 times
Reputation: 1786
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiddlehead View Post
Bleh...another town overrun by coastal equity nomads...like Durango, Steamboat, Bozeman, Park City, Jackson, Aspen, Vail, Crestone, Boulder, Sedona....I suppose for some it is good, but for others paradise lost.

I went through Taos once about 20 years ago. I liked the area, cruised the galleries. I saw a $3000 piece of lacquered driftwood for sale. I knew they were not offering stuff for a guy like me...my experience of the whole Intermountain West is that nice towns that are not so nice that they have caught the roving eye of coastal boomerdom are most attractive to me. I cannot afford a $750k "horse property" at the edge of a town with $30k/year jobs. Plenty can, and neither locals or wages slaves can compete with them. So, beauty to me means a diamond in the rough. Taos does not really fit that bill.
I can't get over some of these comparisons. Taos is a town of 5500 people and still retains a lot of its history unlike most of the other places mentioned. It is about half Hispanic, half Anglo. It is next to one of the oldest (or the oldest) continuously inhabited Indian settlements in North America, Taos Pueblo. The other places listed can't claim that. Per capita income and average rents are lower than the other places mentioned. The town government is still controlled by old Hispanic families. Mayor: Darren Cordova. The town council members are Michael A. Silva, Rudy Abeyta, Amy Quintana and Gene Sanchez. "Overrun" by newcomers? On a shallow level, perhaps, but Taos is truer to its roots than most of the other places mentioned. That's what sets it apart in my opinion.

If some celebrities find it a "safe harbor" it may be because Taos is not the kind of place where people are impressed and throng celebrities. I think most locals don't care and think of them as people just like anyone else. Taos natives probably think "we've been here hundreds of years, and you're only here a few months of the year--who cares?"

If Taos is too "precious" for you, there's always Española.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2012, 11:11 AM
 
3,766 posts, read 4,294,994 times
Reputation: 3868
Quote:
Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
I can't get over some of these comparisons. Taos is a town of 5500 people and still retains a lot of its history unlike most of the other places mentioned. It is about half Hispanic, half Anglo. It is next to one of the oldest (or the oldest) continuously inhabited Indian settlements in North America, Taos Pueblo. The other places listed can't claim that. Per capita income and average rents are lower than the other places mentioned. The town government is still controlled by old Hispanic families. Mayor: Darren Cordova. The town council members are Michael A. Silva, Rudy Abeyta, Amy Quintana and Gene Sanchez. "Overrun" by newcomers? On a shallow level, perhaps, but Taos is truer to its roots than most of the other places mentioned. That's what sets it apart in my opinion.

If some celebrities find it a "safe harbor" it may be because Taos is not the kind of place where people are impressed and throng celebrities. I think most locals don't care and think of them as people just like anyone else. Taos natives probably think "we've been here hundreds of years, and you're only here a few months of the year--who cares?"

If Taos is too "precious" for you, there's always Española.
Great post, aries. Taos also has folks that moved in as part of the counterculture movement back in the '60s & 70's. Lots of those folks are aging community members with children & grandbabies of their own. That element has added an interesting spin to Taos. And yep, we all heard the hum back in those days LOL!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2012, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Tejas
1,816 posts, read 1,784,309 times
Reputation: 1623
Quote:
Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
I can't get over some of these comparisons. Taos is a town of 5500 people and still retains a lot of its history unlike most of the other places mentioned. It is about half Hispanic, half Anglo. It is next to one of the oldest (or the oldest) continuously inhabited Indian settlements in North America, Taos Pueblo. The other places listed can't claim that. Per capita income and average rents are lower than the other places mentioned. The town government is still controlled by old Hispanic families. Mayor: Darren Cordova. The town council members are Michael A. Silva, Rudy Abeyta, Amy Quintana and Gene Sanchez. "Overrun" by newcomers? On a shallow level, perhaps, but Taos is truer to its roots than most of the other places mentioned. That's what sets it apart in my opinion.

If some celebrities find it a "safe harbor" it may be because Taos is not the kind of place where people are impressed and throng celebrities. I think most locals don't care and think of them as people just like anyone else. Taos natives probably think "we've been here hundreds of years, and you're only here a few months of the year--who cares?"

If Taos is too "precious" for you, there's always Española.
So it is either black or white - either you have to live in overpriced, fake and overrun by money Taos or you have to live in crime-ridden, drug infested Espanola?

No wonder we only have 5% rich and 95% poor in this country. For the middle class there is nothing left - the rich get Taos and the rest of the folks get sent to Espanola.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2012, 12:48 PM
 
938 posts, read 1,269,807 times
Reputation: 533
So focusing on New Mexico, do any residents have new things to share about why Ruidoso, Silver City, Aztec, Socorro, Alamogordo/Tularosa or Los Alamos are diamonds in the rough? Any other proposed New Mexico candidates for cities or towns about to enter or in their primes, before becoming too precious, too expensive and "crowded"?

If you want to discuss diamonds in the rough cities and towns in other states, I have set up this new thread: Diamonds in the rough in the west
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2012, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
50,021 posts, read 42,368,204 times
Reputation: 21563
Quote:
Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
I don't think I'd use the word "pretty" to describe the beauty of any town in New Mexico. Our towns have grit, they can be starkly beautiful, stunning, colorful, earthy, surreal even, there is beauty in the austerity of the landscape. There is much more yang than yin.
Gee, I would have to totally disagree. There are so many ways to view beauty, and NM has a beauty all its own. Look at the purple mountains just before sunset to the east of Albuquerque, or the red rock formations when you drive west on 40? How about the surrounding area in Sante Fe? I haven't been to Taos so can't comment , but the one thing we loved about NM was it's unusual beauty. It is not the kind of beauty we have here, in NWA or the spectacular sights driving along Pacific Coast highway in Ca but it is beautiful just the same.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2012, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Nuevo México
1,820 posts, read 2,201,714 times
Reputation: 1786
Quote:
Originally Posted by ognend View Post
So it is either black or white - either you have to live in overpriced, fake and overrun by money Taos or you have to live in crime-ridden, drug infested Espanola?

No wonder we only have 5% rich and 95% poor in this country. For the middle class there is nothing left - the rich get Taos and the rest of the folks get sent to Espanola.
I think you missed my point, that Taos is a "real town" (even has a real heroin problem like "real towns" have), with real history, even while it caters to the tastes of a broad spectrum of society from the poor to the wealthy. I do not see Taos as "fake" and "overrun" by money like some of the strictly tourist or resort communities. In fact some Taos natives I know have expressed the opinion lately that the town has "fallen on hard times."

I offered Española as an example of an authentically New Mexican community that does not cater to the wealthy or the tourist trade which some posters want to avoid. I don't know that it has any more crime or drugs than Taos does.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2012, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Nuevo México
1,820 posts, read 2,201,714 times
Reputation: 1786
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Gee, I would have to totally disagree. There are so many ways to view beauty, and NM has a beauty all its own. Look at the purple mountains just before sunset to the east of Albuquerque, or the red rock formations when you drive west on 40? How about the surrounding area in Sante Fe? I haven't been to Taos so can't comment , but the one thing we loved about NM was it's unusual beauty. It is not the kind of beauty we have here, in NWA or the spectacular sights driving along Pacific Coast highway in Ca but it is beautiful just the same.
You misread my post also. You thought I was saying New Mexico is not "pretty" therefore it is ugly. I was saying "pretty" is not a good enough word, because New Mexico is more than merely "pretty", it is beautiful in a much more special way.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Mexico
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top