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Old 06-19-2013, 12:14 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,164 posts, read 38,978,487 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanst530 View Post
I'm a big fan of odd-ball beers, so I'm going to have to try that stuff out! Although I doubt they distribute out to southern california.
We have quite a few beers brewed in New Mexico, and wine also.
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Old 06-19-2013, 03:18 PM
 
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I'll eat ONLY green chile and only in moderation. For some reason it doesn't bother my "gut" like red chiles and sauces do. Still, I want a glass of milk available just in case. By the way, the Largo Cafe in Quemado serves excellent green chile cheesebergers.
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Old 06-19-2013, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
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This is from the State of New Mexico website. Chile and frijoles are the official state vegetables:

Chile (capsicum annum L.) and frijoles (pinto beans of the phaseolus vulgaris family), New Mexico's state vegetables, are a unique part of the New Mexico diet. The pinto bean, along with maize (corn) and squash, has been a staple of the Pueblo Indian diet since pre-historic times. The early Spanish settlers brought the chile plant to New Mexico from the Valley of Mexico, where the Aztecs had cultivated the plant for centuries. Chile is a pungent pepper which is harvested in the early fall, toasted, peeled and served as a delicious stew, stuffed with cheese or made into a favorite recipe. When the chile ripens it turns bright red. It is then strung (chile ristras) and hung out to dry. There are as many ways to prepare red chile, as there are claims of who harvests the mildest or the hottest. New Mexico State University can take credit for developing a variety of strains. The use of frijoles, chile and corn has given the state a distinctive cuisine, which can only be considered "Native New Mexican."
The combination of the vitamin-rich chile and the protein-rich frijole offers natives and visitors alike a memorable dining experience. In 1965, the legislative debate over adoption of the vegetable centered over the argument that the two vegetables were inseparable so both the chile and frijole were adopted as the official vegetables.


It bothers me when they say "frijole" when the singular is really "frijol." Just like when people say "tamale" for "tamal."
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Old 06-20-2013, 11:15 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,019 posts, read 16,592,463 times
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I would say that green chile is more dear to residents than the tourists. To say that its popularity is a 'tourist' thing would be really off-base. It is intrinsic and unique to the culture of New Mexico.

On the other hand, I am dubious of people who take it too far. It is a food, not a religion.
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Old 06-22-2013, 09:24 AM
 
391 posts, read 738,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanst530 View Post
I'm curious to know...
So where does this popular New Mexican food really stand? Is it really just a touristy-type food that was made popular to affix an identity to New Mexico, or is it something that is truly New Mexican, and has deep roots to the state and its people (and just happens to be popular)?
Chile, whether in red or green form, ground into powder or fresh roasted (and who doesn't love that magic smell) is New Mexico soul food. The same could be said of beans and corn, except that chile seems to occupy a particular niche slightly above those other things.
It's a "tourist-type" food in the same way that Jambalaya, Gumbo, Etouffee, and Red Beans & Rice are "tourist-type" foods in Louisiana....tourists certainly seek out and love it (or not ) when visiting New Mexico, but if no one crossed the border into New Mexico for 20 years the local population would still be eating, and celebrating, chile in it's many forms and preparations, and in large quantities.
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Old 06-22-2013, 10:38 AM
 
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Give me Chimayo red chile wine or give me death.

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Old 06-22-2013, 11:11 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
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Basic mild for the "touristy-type"...

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Old 06-22-2013, 11:51 AM
 
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I thank God for green chile!!
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Old 06-22-2013, 02:07 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,019 posts, read 16,592,463 times
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I had a breakfast burrito smothered in green for breakfast, a green chile cheeseburger at the Frontier for lunch, and later I am having some red chile enchiladas for dinner.

Chile, chile, chile :-)
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Old 06-22-2013, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Jersey
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Since one isn't allowed to express strong opinions about green/redchile in this section, I'm just going to say that the stuff is fairly over-rated.
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