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Old 07-17-2013, 10:46 PM
Status: "I voted!" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,284 posts, read 3,963,513 times
Reputation: 9491

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We like green chile in Colorado, too - especially Southwestern Colorado! I love the smell of green chiles roasting in those big drums at road side stands and outside the grocery stores in the fall. Buy a big batch of roasted green chiles and put them in the freezer to keep you warm over the winter months. Green chile has been prevelant in the Southwest for as long as I can remember and probably the Pueblo Indians were roasting them a 1,000 years ago - wouldn't surprise me. Green chile makes EVERYTHING taste better and then there's chile rellenos. Yum!

I have a little garden patch that I have planted with various varieties of chile plants. They're growing like gang-busters, and I expect to be making my first batch of home grown, home made green chile in another week or two. I'm getting hungry!
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Old 07-18-2013, 08:57 AM
 
391 posts, read 737,708 times
Reputation: 589
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
For me, it is NM. When I want to remember the days we lived in NM I go to the freezer and pull out a package of Hatch chili. They are one of the few chilis I know that have any flavor other than a burning flavor. Don't get me wrong, I am a real chili lover and yes, some Hatch chili can be hot, but not like other varieties. .
Not to rain on anyone's chile parade,nmnita, but there is no such thing as a chile cultivar called Hatch. Hatch is only a place where some damned good chile is grown. For green pods they mostly grow a type of the Nu-Mex cultivar, or Anaheim or Sandia, all of which were largely developed at New Mexico State University. The Anaheim, strictly speaking, had some breeding work done in California but it's basis is a New Mexican variety. Hatch has a great Chile Festival, gets lots of publicity, and a heck of a lot of chile is canned under various Hatch labels, but there is no Hatch variety of chile.

The nice folks at the Chile Pepper Institute at NMSU have said to me, a bit amused, that the Hatch thingg is one of the most prevalent misconceptions going about chile, and they've almost given up trying to correct errant information about it. They've also said that virtually all chile varieties grown under commercial cultivation in New Mexico came from NMSU's chile breeding programs, beginning in the early 1900's with work done by the renowned Fabian Garcia, the godfather of NM chile. I live a couple miles away from NMSU and am a regular visitor to the Chile Pepper Institute. They sell lots of seeds, which I don't buy, but they also have some very interesting salsas, dried chile products and various other chile related items. Profits from the CPI store funds student work with chile.

The bad news is that chile acreage planted in New Mexico has declined by almost 75%! In 1992 there were over 32,000 acres of chile planted annually, and some 20 years later it's down to roughly 8,000, thanks in large part to foreign imports from Mexico and China (yes, China). I'd suspect most Chinese imports would be dried red, though that's just speculation on my part.

The news is even worse for Hatch, thanks to the ongoing drought. The Rio Grande is just about dry, with a tiny fraction of normal river irrigation water available, and the aquifer underlying the Hatch Valley is fairly saline...it's salty water. Chile is sensitive to salt, so when ground water is used the salt is concentrated in the soil so it gradually becomes less and less friendly to the chile plant. There's been little rain in the past few years to help wash the salt from the soil, so things don't look too good in Hatch right now. Hopefully that will change. A lot of farmers are growning cotton instead, because it tolerates salt much better.

Down here in the Mesilla Valley the aquifer is much larger and less salty, so it's possible that the center of the chile universe may move farther south where conditions are more friendly for the chile plants, particularly if groundwater irrigation is required. There's already a lot of great chile grown in the MV, though Hatch gets the publicity.

I have hopes for the NM chile industry, but it's on the ropes, I'm sorry to say. When you buy chile, try to make sure you're buying NEW MEXICO chile (though sometimes that's not possible...)
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Old 07-18-2013, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Where I live.
9,191 posts, read 18,536,960 times
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Yep, I'm a member/supporter of the NMSU Chile Institute, and one of these days I'm going to go by and see my brick, LOL!

Their newsletter is informative, and I'm glad to see that seeds for the old heritage varieties are available--albeit expensive, as are all their seeds.

I prefer my homegrown chile (Parker is my favorite) to what I can buy, and it's nice to have frozen Bueno available, though that is obviously not as good as what you can grow yourself. Enjoy!

The industry really is in sad shape at the current time. :-(
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Old 07-18-2013, 10:46 AM
Status: "I voted!" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,284 posts, read 3,963,513 times
Reputation: 9491
Quote:
Originally Posted by cosmicrowbar View Post

~ snip ~

The bad news is that chile acreage planted in New Mexico has declined by almost 75%! In 1992 there were over 32,000 acres of chile planted annually, and some 20 years later it's down to roughly 8,000, thanks in large part to foreign imports from Mexico and China (yes, China). I'd suspect most Chinese imports would be dried red, though that's just speculation on my part...

I have hopes for the NM chile industry, but it's on the ropes, I'm sorry to say. When you buy chile, try to make sure you're buying NEW MEXICO chile (though sometimes that's not possible...)
You have got to be kidding. CHINA? Have they no shame? Where will it ever end?

Thanks for the heads up on buying chile. But I don't see green chile in either the produce section or in the can being labeled as to point of origin. How can we know?
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Old 07-18-2013, 11:53 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,159 posts, read 38,951,247 times
Reputation: 28153
China is a giant in the production of fresh chile peppers with 14 million (metric) tons of green "chillies and peppers" being produced in 2007 according to FAO estimates. Mexico comes in at number two with 1.89 million tons. India is the winner for dried peppers with an annual production of 1.2 million tons and China produces 250,000 tons.

From article: Fiery Foods and Barbecue SuperSite - China and the World

But I ain't moving... We enjoy New Mexico...


Rich

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Old 07-24-2013, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Old Town
1,933 posts, read 3,133,802 times
Reputation: 1836
Quote:
Originally Posted by NMHacker View Post
NM Green Chile won.

Vote- Best Iconic American Food Nominees: 2013 10Best Readers' Choice Travel Awards
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Old 07-24-2013, 11:48 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,159 posts, read 38,951,247 times
Reputation: 28153
Quote:
Originally Posted by NMHacker View Post
They won 1st place! And I like Green Chile.

I have eaten six out of the 10. Got tired of the second place food, Baltimore - Maryland Crabs after a few years...
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Old 07-29-2013, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,382 posts, read 79,577,446 times
Reputation: 38711
Quote:
Originally Posted by cosmicrowbar View Post


Not to rain on anyone's chile parade,nmnita, but there is no such thing as a chile cultivar called Hatch. Hatch is only a place where some damned good chile is grown. For green pods they mostly grow a type of the Nu-Mex cultivar, or Anaheim or Sandia, all of which were largely developed at New Mexico State University. The Anaheim, strictly speaking, had some breeding work done in California but it's basis is a New Mexican variety. Hatch has a great Chile Festival, gets lots of publicity, and a heck of a lot of chile is canned under various Hatch labels, but there is no Hatch variety of chile.

The nice folks at the Chile Pepper Institute at NMSU have said to me, a bit amused, that the Hatch thingg is one of the most prevalent misconceptions going about chile, and they've almost given up trying to correct errant information about it. They've also said that virtually all chile varieties grown under commercial cultivation in New Mexico came from NMSU's chile breeding programs, beginning in the early 1900's with work done by the renowned Fabian Garcia, the godfather of NM chile. I live a couple miles away from NMSU and am a regular visitor to the Chile Pepper Institute. They sell lots of seeds, which I don't buy, but they also have some very interesting salsas, dried chile products and various other chile related items. Profits from the CPI store funds student work with chile.

The bad news is that chile acreage planted in New Mexico has declined by almost 75%! In 1992 there were over 32,000 acres of chile planted annually, and some 20 years later it's down to roughly 8,000, thanks in large part to foreign imports from Mexico and China (yes, China). I'd suspect most Chinese imports would be dried red, though that's just speculation on my part.

The news is even worse for Hatch, thanks to the ongoing drought. The Rio Grande is just about dry, with a tiny fraction of normal river irrigation water available, and the aquifer underlying the Hatch Valley is fairly saline...it's salty water. Chile is sensitive to salt, so when ground water is used the salt is concentrated in the soil so it gradually becomes less and less friendly to the chile plant. There's been little rain in the past few years to help wash the salt from the soil, so things don't look too good in Hatch right now. Hopefully that will change. A lot of farmers are growning cotton instead, because it tolerates salt much better.

Down here in the Mesilla Valley the aquifer is much larger and less salty, so it's possible that the center of the chile universe may move farther south where conditions are more friendly for the chile plants, particularly if groundwater irrigation is required. There's already a lot of great chile grown in the MV, though Hatch gets the publicity.

I have hopes for the NM chile industry, but it's on the ropes, I'm sorry to say. When you buy chile, try to make sure you're buying NEW MEXICO chile (though sometimes that's not possible...)
HELLO: Look at my screen name: I lived in NM for several years and yes, I am aware of what Hatch Chili is. I know the history of the chili and yes, according to research, they are the same as an Anaheim, but my reference to Hatch, simply is, we all know people both in NM and outside refer to them as Hatch. When the NM peppers come to our markets, they are advertised as Hatch, not Anaheim.

I asked our local grocery store produce manager when they would be in here: he said another couple of weeks.
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Old 07-29-2013, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
1,390 posts, read 2,431,003 times
Reputation: 2371
Quote:
Originally Posted by cosmicrowbar View Post


Not to rain on anyone's chile parade,nmnita, but there is no such thing as a chile cultivar called Hatch. Hatch is only a place where some damned good chile is grown.
But Buffalo Wings are still made from buffalo, right?
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Old 07-29-2013, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Old Town
1,933 posts, read 3,133,802 times
Reputation: 1836
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
HELLO: Look at my screen name: I lived in NM for several years and yes, I am aware of what Hatch Chili is. I know the history of the chili and yes, according to research, they are the same as an Anaheim, but my reference to Hatch, simply is, we all know people both in NM and outside refer to them as Hatch. When the NM peppers come to our markets, they are advertised as Hatch, not Anaheim.

I asked our local grocery store produce manager when they would be in here: he said another couple of weeks.
When time for Chile comes. I always ask for the Non-Hatch Chile. IMHO, Green Chile from Lemitar, Belen, Los Lunas, South Valley Abq and Corrales taste better for some reason.
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