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Old 12-31-2018, 12:56 PM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
8,009 posts, read 16,947,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
US Route 54 through New Mexico
File:US Route 54 in New Mexico.JPG
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Route_54#New_Mexico
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...New_Mexico.JPG




Looks a bit narrow....


I really enjoyed myself driving on that road in August. I think there were less than 10 cars and maybe 5 homes that I saw during the entire drive from Clayton to Springer.

To me, the obvious slow stretch of road is I-10 in Lordsburg. 65 mph for about 6 miles. I think it is used as a training grounds for new State Troopers. In contrast, I-25 through Socorro was raised to 75 mph a while ago. Socorro has 5 times the population of Lordsburg.

Also, US 285 between Vaughn and Roswell was recently raised to 75. As Zoidberg said in a post in this thread, roads like this one shouldn't have a speed limit.
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Old 12-31-2018, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Sacramento Mtns of NM
4,177 posts, read 6,628,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
I really enjoyed myself driving on that road in August. I think there were less than 10 cars and maybe 5 homes that I saw during the entire drive from Clayton to Springer.

Clayton and Springer are on US-56/412, not US-54.


US-54 is a busier route, but still not heavily traveled in the NE part of NM.
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Old Today, 11:13 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,497 posts, read 39,652,608 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by augiedogie View Post
What is it with New Mexico and their speed limits. I just came back from a trip to Ruidoso. On the trip I traveled on some 4 lane and some 2 lane roads, but most in very rural areas. Yet in spite of there being almost no traffic or people around anywhere, The speed limits never hit 70 MPH. The best I had was 65. But I even was limited on some stretches to just 60 or even 55, even in the middle of nowhere. Long stretches of the hwy between Ruidoso and Roswell, even though being 4 lanes, and very little traffic were down to 45 mph. We have city streets in Lubbock that are posted at 50. What gives with these crazy low speed limits?

It really is anoying traveling in NM, as the distances are long and boring, yet they have these crazy low limits. Are they trying to discourage tourists?
Maybe it is their accident rates...

From: https://www.nwitimes.com/autos/the-m...4071634.html#2

#7. New Mexico
Average Fatalities in a Year (per 100,000): 20.59
Total Fatalities: 6,474
Percent of Fatalities Related to Alcohol: 39.70%

#22. Texas
Average Fatalities in a Year (per 100,000): 14.67
Total Fatalities: 55,899
Percent of Fatalities Related to Alcohol: 31.97%

And some might think driving faster would decrease the death rate?

According to figures from the U.S. government, 35,092 people died in car-related accidents in the U.S. in 2015 a 7.2 percent increase in traffic deaths from 2014.

Why the recent uptick in traffic fatalities? The National Safety Council suggests that declining gas prices have resulted in people driving longer distances. The organization also notes that today's drivers are more distracted than ever, and are more likely to use social media behind the wheel.

Regardless, while driving fatalities have increased nationwide, some states are more dangerous than others. Using data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, data analysts used the total number of car-related fatalities for each state from 2000 to 2015 to rank the deadliest states for car accidents. They then found the average number of fatalities each year per 100,000 people. States are ranked by the average fatalities per year, from least to most dangerous. In the event of a tie, states are listed in ascending order by the total number of fatalities.

Notably, the states that dominate the top of this list tend to be more rural, while states with big urban cores like New York, New Jersey and California rank toward the bottom. This is likely because rural residents face longer commutes and driving distances than their urban counterparts. Urban residents are also more likely to walk, bike or use public transportation.
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