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Old 11-23-2018, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
3,006 posts, read 4,611,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
I've been out West in AZ for a road trip, but I was in middle school and I didn't comprehend it much. This was like in the summer between 6th grade and 7th grade probably. Places I have traveled out West are California, Seattle area, and AZ. I remember we did visit Sedona definitely. They had fireplaces in the hotels. My brother said, from his memory, he remembers that AZ was in the 100s during the trip. It didn't feel extremely brutal to me. From my memory, I remember seeing highway signs for Flagstaff and Phoenix, so I assume we passed through the two areas, except we did not go into the cities themselves.
Well you have to come out again with fresh eyes, looking at driving videos doesn't cut it. I agree there are more spectacular landscapes in AZ and UT, but you also get a lot more tourists and crowds in those places. Busloads of tourists who fly into Las Vegas get dumped on the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, etc. What I like about NM is the accessibility of our parks and monuments, the lower numbers of tourists, and lots of other non-touristy destinations that you can enjoy that are beautiful. And NM has architecture that other states don't have (except imitations).

San Francisco de Asis Church, Ranchos de Taos

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Old 11-23-2018, 03:18 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
721 posts, read 272,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
Well you have to come out again with fresh eyes, looking at driving videos doesn't cut it. I agree there are more spectacular landscapes in AZ and UT, but you also get a lot more tourists and crowds in those places. Busloads of tourists who fly into Las Vegas get dumped on the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, etc. What I like about NM is the accessibility of our parks and monuments, the lower numbers of tourists, and lots of other non-touristy destinations that you can enjoy that are beautiful. And NM has architecture that other states don't have (except imitations).

San Francisco de Asis Church, Ranchos de Taos
So I guess NM is more homey than AZ and UT according to you. NJ is like that too. NJ is a bunch of cookie cutter suburbs, but NJ does have unique stuff in it like "hidden gems" and yet, tourists don't come to NJ at all. The out of staters we get in NJ are just people visiting relatives in NJ. I guess NM is a homey place. I wonder how "localized" it is. NJ has "localized" where you have to be a native to really understand the hidden gems of the place such as undocumented hiking areas and missile bases that are not well documented.
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Old 11-24-2018, 04:10 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,109 posts, read 9,065,068 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
So I guess NM is more homey than AZ and UT according to you.
NM has had its share of cultural decimation, but to much less an extent than surrounding states. A lot of people that move to NM are content to "let it be", unlike AZ and other states hoards of people moving in who wanted to fashion things their own way.

Quote:
I wonder how "localized" it is. NJ has "localized" where you have to be a native to really understand the hidden gems of the place such as undocumented hiking areas and missile bases that are not well documented.
There are these in NM. There are Indian ruins that are not on any map, fishing locations that only locals know about. There are also a lot of gems that aren't "secret" but at the same time nobody goes out of the way to publicize them.



Even the highly publicized, famous places are sparsely visited. Last time I visited Chaco canyon, we were the only people in the entire valley. Last time I visited Bandelier, there were a total of about 7 people, including us, in the whole park.
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Old 11-24-2018, 09:59 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,510 posts, read 39,673,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
Even the highly publicized, famous places are sparsely visited. Last time i visited chaco canyon, we were the only people in the entire valley. Last time i visited bandelier, there were a total of about 7 people, including us, in the whole park.
Recreation Visitors by Month, Chaco Culture NHP

Chaco Canyon, Just a few years selected, it varies a lot:

2017 55,334
2013 29,917
1997 113,336

Jan 2018 1,231
Jan 1980 678
Jan 2003 3,385

All The Stats at: https://irma.nps.gov/Stats/SSRSRepor...ear)?Park=CHCU


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Old 11-24-2018, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
3,006 posts, read 4,611,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
So I guess NM is more homey than AZ and UT according to you. NJ is like that too. NJ is a bunch of cookie cutter suburbs, but NJ does have unique stuff in it like "hidden gems" and yet, tourists don't come to NJ at all. The out of staters we get in NJ are just people visiting relatives in NJ. I guess NM is a homey place. I wonder how "localized" it is. NJ has "localized" where you have to be a native to really understand the hidden gems of the place such as undocumented hiking areas and missile bases that are not well documented.
Don't get me wrong, tourists do come here from around the country and the world, unlike NJ. And sometimes national parks in NM can get crowded in summer or around holidays, including Tent Rocks, Bandelier, and others. People can wait in their cars for hours just to get in. I recommend visiting on a weekday in the off seasons. But the places in the country that are known for the "best scenery" also will draw the most crowds which detracts from the scenery. I think NM strikes a nice balance of having more than enough natural beauty and landscape variety, without drawing the crowds that you often find at more famous landmarks to our north and west. Just hiking in the Sandia Mountains at the edge of Albuquerque I am often surprised at how few people you find on the trails (sometimes hours without seeing anyone else), considering the size of the nearby metro area.
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Old 11-25-2018, 12:07 AM
Status: "They'll still be called the Seattle Supersonics, dudes" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Alamogordo, NM
5,609 posts, read 5,336,490 times
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Don't get me wrong, tourists do come here from around the country and the world, unlike NJ. And sometimes national parks in NM can get crowded in summer or around holidays, including Tent Rocks, Bandelier, and others. People can wait in their cars for hours just to get in. I recommend visiting on a weekday in the off seasons. But the places in the country that are known for the "best scenery" also will draw the most crowds which detracts from the scenery. I think NM strikes a nice balance of having more than enough natural beauty and landscape variety, without drawing the crowds that you often find at more famous landmarks to our north and west. Just hiking in the Sandia Mountains at the edge of Albuquerque I am often surprised at how few people you find on the trails (sometimes hours without seeing anyone else), considering the size of the nearby metro area.

Who would wait in their car for hours just to get in to a National Park? People that are bound and determined to see a particular National Park and will get in come hell or high water? Yikes.

Are they the same people who will wait an hour ta get in to their favorite restaurant(s)? Wow. That's bizarre to me.
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Old 11-25-2018, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
3,006 posts, read 4,611,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elkotronics View Post

Who would wait in their car for hours just to get in to a National Park? People that are bound and determined to see a particular National Park and will get in come hell or high water? Yikes.
People who travel cross-country just to check off another national park on their list. A place like Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks is small enough that it can quickly reach capacity and the result is a long wait to get in.
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Old 11-25-2018, 01:35 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
5,513 posts, read 3,131,400 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
People who travel cross-country just to check off another national park on their list. A place like Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks is small enough that it can quickly reach capacity and the result is a long wait to get in.
I've never had to wait at Kasha-Katuwe but I have unwittingly made the trip only to find it was closed on a pueblo sacred event date. They have expanded the parking area but the place can be loved to death.

Another similar spot is San Lorenzo Canyon down near Socorro (Sevilleta NWR) but is is a little hard to get to.







Last edited by SunGrins; 11-25-2018 at 01:47 PM..
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Old 11-25-2018, 03:10 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
721 posts, read 272,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
Don't get me wrong, tourists do come here from around the country and the world, unlike NJ. And sometimes national parks in NM can get crowded in summer or around holidays, including Tent Rocks, Bandelier, and others. People can wait in their cars for hours just to get in. I recommend visiting on a weekday in the off seasons. But the places in the country that are known for the "best scenery" also will draw the most crowds which detracts from the scenery. I think NM strikes a nice balance of having more than enough natural beauty and landscape variety, without drawing the crowds that you often find at more famous landmarks to our north and west. Just hiking in the Sandia Mountains at the edge of Albuquerque I am often surprised at how few people you find on the trails (sometimes hours without seeing anyone else), considering the size of the nearby metro area.
I never heard about people waiting in their cars forever to get in. I would think that more applies to places at AZ.
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Old 11-27-2018, 06:08 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,112 posts, read 16,934,211 times
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Tent Rocks has limited parking, so when the parking lot is full, it becomes a "One goes out, one goes in" sort of deal, and this leads to cars lined up at the little ranger gate. I suspect this is really only an issue on weekends during the high tourism season.

I remember only 20 or so years ago when there was no real parking lot at all, you just pulled off into the junipers, and you might see a half dozen people in the canyon. Now I would steer clear of the place during its most popular times.
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