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Old 12-18-2018, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,109 posts, read 9,065,068 times
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I wouldn't call Santa Fe a "metro" area - it's a small town. But you are correct, the OP is seeming to imply with his last post that all towns in NM are "part of Albq metro" which, of course is not true. Santa Fe is its own distinct town. As well as all other towns that are further than, say, 20 miles from Albq.
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Old 12-18-2018, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Silver Hill, Albuquerque
788 posts, read 754,194 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
I wouldn't call Santa Fe a "metro" area - it's a small town. But you are correct, the OP is seeming to imply with his last post that all towns in NM are "part of Albq metro" which, of course is not true. Santa Fe is its own distinct town. As well as all other towns that are further than, say, 20 miles from Albq.
The OP has never visited New Mexico and is trying to form his opinions about the state electronically. That's pretty hard to do with any accuracy, and several folks have suggested he actually come here and check it out before his plans to relocate get too much further along.

As for whether Santa Fe's a town or a city, Santa Fe proper only has about 84,000 per the US Census Bureau, but it's the heart of a Census-designated Metropolitan Area encompassing all of Santa Fe County with a population of 144,000 or so. Small in the grand scheme of things, but big for New Mexico. We agree that it's a distinct community from Albuquerque, and certainly not a "satellite city."

Last edited by Cactus Hibs; 12-18-2018 at 12:38 PM..
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Old 12-18-2018, 12:29 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,510 posts, read 39,673,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
I would say that NM only has one metro area, which is ABQ and every other major municipality name in NM is just a satellite city influenced by ABQ.
The State of New Mexico has a total of four metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs). 7 of the state's 33 counties are classified by the United States Census Bureau as metropolitan. As of the 2000 census, these counties had a combined population 1,147,424 (63.1% of the state's total population). Based on a July 1, 2009 population estimate, that figure rose to 1,335,985 (66.5% of the state's total population).

Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o..._in_New_Mexico




Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
I am not interested in living in ABQ itself. I would like to live in those nice neighborhoods east of it where the houses are nice and spread apart. I love New Mexico for that while AZ crowds their houses if you want to live close to jobs even though AZ has a lot land. Utah has crowding due to the lack of flat land.
You are vague. I really have no clue what you are talking about.
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Old 12-18-2018, 01:12 PM
 
1,839 posts, read 1,333,971 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
OP, NM has varied terrain. I'd say, that the scenery in the mountains (Ruidoso, and areas around and between Taos and Santa Fe) are the most scenic areas. It's also a bit cooler up at that elevation, just a bit. Hiking is popular outside of Santa Fe, though I don't know how people do it in the heat of the summer. But there are lakes hidden up there, along the trails across the spine of the mountains, that are used for as prayer sites by the local tribal people. Taos is particularly beautiful, because of the mountain backdrop, and because it has creeks going through town, so the town is greener than almost anywhere else in the state.

Social life for people your age: improving in Santa Fe. There used to be a population drain of young people, who'd leave because "there's nobody to date". SF is a retiree town, but not as much as those locations in AZ. There are more music venues in town now, there's more to do, and the younger cohort is growing. What line of work are you in? You'd have to secure a job, which isn't always easy in a small-is town (70,ooo, approx.), but people do manage.

I've always lived in big urban areas (Seattle, San Fran Bay Area), but I adjusted very easily to this size of small town, the relative lack of traffic congestion, the ease of getting out of town into scenery, etc. I now prefer the low density and quietude of NM. There's a really good film scene in town, btw. There are several indie theaters that specialize in indie films. There's somewhat of a film industry in NM, and that includes the SF area, too.

So, tell us about yourself; what are you studying in university? What type of career are you envisioning for yourself?
I'm much older than the OP (I'm 44) but I'm looking to make a huge life change by relocating from congested, crowded Southern California to a much more rural location, and New Mexico is on my list.

I am not married and have no kids, and I am looking to live a relatively modest, simple life. I have no dreams of having some fancy profession or job title. For most of the last ten years, I have done some freelance writing work, worked a few other odd/side jobs here and there, but for the bulk of that time, I have operated my own pet-sitting/house-sitting/dog walking service, which has worked out quite well here in So. Cal. Truthfully, I'd love to continue that pet-sitting/house-sitting service wherever I go, even if it's only as a side business. I never liked the idea of working a traditional job with traditional hours or of having to have an actual "career" just because that is what society expects. Too stifling for me. I value flexibility and freedom and prefer to work more on my own terms rather than on someone else's.

I have family all over Colorado, and I have driven through New Mexico many times over the years en route to Colorado. It's a pretty state. To live, I'd prefer higher elevation areas though as I am not a big fan of intense or prolonged heat or summers, so places like Las Cruces would be out. Santa Fe might be an option, as would places such as Taos or Las Vegas. I have family in Trinidad, Colorado, and while staying there I have explored the Raton, New Mexico area, and that is a quaint little town, but one without much to offer other than a few stores and restaurants and a bank here and there.

Last year I visited a wolf sanctuary near Ramah, New Mexico, which is about 65 miles southeast of Gallup, and that area is very beautiful -- but isolated. It's a great place for people who wish to live off-grid or as close to off-grid as possible. Very rural. The sanctuary is actually located in a place called Candy Kitchen, but Ramah is the only actual town nearby. If I were independently wealthy or didn't have to work, I could easily see myself living in one of those relatively remote areas. But since I'm not, I have to live in or near a somewhat populated area.

Anyways, interesting thread, and I look forward to reading additional responses (not necessarily to my own, but to the OP's).
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Old 12-19-2018, 11:47 AM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
8,010 posts, read 16,951,748 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnthonyJ34 View Post
I'm much older than the OP (I'm 44) but I'm looking to make a huge life change by relocating from congested, crowded Southern California to a much more rural location, and New Mexico is on my list.

I am not married and have no kids, and I am looking to live a relatively modest, simple life. I have no dreams of having some fancy profession or job title. For most of the last ten years, I have done some freelance writing work, worked a few other odd/side jobs here and there, but for the bulk of that time, I have operated my own pet-sitting/house-sitting/dog walking service, which has worked out quite well here in So. Cal. Truthfully, I'd love to continue that pet-sitting/house-sitting service wherever I go, even if it's only as a side business. I never liked the idea of working a traditional job with traditional hours or of having to have an actual "career" just because that is what society expects. Too stifling for me. I value flexibility and freedom and prefer to work more on my own terms rather than on someone else's.

I have family all over Colorado, and I have driven through New Mexico many times over the years en route to Colorado. It's a pretty state. To live, I'd prefer higher elevation areas though as I am not a big fan of intense or prolonged heat or summers, so places like Las Cruces would be out. Santa Fe might be an option, as would places such as Taos or Las Vegas. I have family in Trinidad, Colorado, and while staying there I have explored the Raton, New Mexico area, and that is a quaint little town, but one without much to offer other than a few stores and restaurants and a bank here and there.

Last year I visited a wolf sanctuary near Ramah, New Mexico, which is about 65 miles southeast of Gallup, and that area is very beautiful -- but isolated. It's a great place for people who wish to live off-grid or as close to off-grid as possible. Very rural. The sanctuary is actually located in a place called Candy Kitchen, but Ramah is the only actual town nearby. If I were independently wealthy or didn't have to work, I could easily see myself living in one of those relatively remote areas. But since I'm not, I have to live in or near a somewhat populated area.

Anyways, interesting thread, and I look forward to reading additional responses (not necessarily to my own, but to the OP's).
Since you seem to have much more of a plan and an understanding than the OP, I think your post warrants a thoughtful and honest reply. If you think that Raton is without much to offer, consider that Raton is the 29th largest "city" in New Mexico, with a population of 6103. (In comparison the 29th largest city in California with a population of 163,924 would easily be the 2nd largest city in New Mexico.) If being remote and not having to rely upon employment was not a factor, Red River is a touristy, remote town that does cater to out of towners touring the Enchanted Circle, and sounds like a place you would enjoy living. Practically speaking, however, if you wanted close proximity to the Albuquerque metro, which will afford you the ability to make a living, the smaller towns, Edgewood, Tijeras, and Cedar Crest are all remote (relative to California) and are less than an hour from Albuquerque. By far and away the most interesting town on the Turquoise Trail, Madrid, is in between Santa Fe and Albuquerque, is absolutely remote, but your commute here would be a lot longer. Just some immediate thoughts about your situation. Every one of these towns is higher in elevation and will spare you the summers that you accurately describe in Las Cruces.
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Old 12-19-2018, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,109 posts, read 9,065,068 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cactus Hibs View Post
The OP has never visited New Mexico and is trying to form his opinions about the state electronically. That's pretty hard to do with any accuracy,
Well, we're here to set him straight.
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Old 12-19-2018, 07:00 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
74,514 posts, read 66,140,508 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
I suspect the vast majority of this was summer months. I admit the last time I visited was during the cold season.
I was there in April, which was a magical time! the weather at that time of year is really changeable, from almost winter weather, with light snowfall, to glorious bright spring weather the next day, warm enough for lighter clothing. The day I was walking around the ruins, it started to snow lightly, and over the roughly hour and a half that I was checking out the ruins, the mesas came to be blanketed in snow. The silence, and the sight of the white mesa tops contrasting with the orange earth, and the light dusting of snow on the surfaces of the ruins was enchanting!

I highly recommend visiting Chaco in April or the first week of May. There aren't many tourists at that time, at all.
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Old 12-26-2018, 03:56 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,510 posts, read 39,673,042 times
Reputation: 28602
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
I would say that NM only has one metro area, which is ABQ and every other major municipality name in NM is just a satellite city influenced by ABQ. I am not interested in living in ABQ itself. I would like to live in those nice neighborhoods east of it where the houses are nice and spread apart. I love New Mexico for that while AZ crowds their houses if you want to live close to jobs even though AZ has a lot land. Utah has crowding due to the lack of flat land.
The State of New Mexico has a total of four metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs). 7 of the state's 33 counties are classified by the United States Census Bureau as metropolitan. As of the 2000 census, these counties had a combined population 1,147,424 (63.1% of the state's total population). Based on a July 1, 2009 population estimate, that figure rose to 1,335,985 (66.5% of the state's total population).
Contents

Metropolitan areas:

Albuquerque MSA
Bernalillo County
Sandoval County
Torrance County
Valencia County
Farmington MSA
San Juan County
Las Cruces MSA
Doa Ana County
Santa Fe MSA
Santa Fe County
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o..._in_New_Mexico
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Old Today, 12:26 AM
 
16,244 posts, read 3,368,441 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
I would say that NM only has one metro area, which is ABQ and every other major municipality name in NM is just a satellite city influenced by ABQ. I am not interested in living in ABQ itself. I would like to live in those nice neighborhoods east of it where the houses are nice and spread apart. I love New Mexico for that while AZ crowds their houses if you want to live close to jobs even though AZ has a lot land. Utah has crowding due to the lack of flat land.
Las Cruces,Farmington,and Santa Fe are not "satellites" of the Duke City.They are their own cities.
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