U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Mexico
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-03-2019, 08:38 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
717 posts, read 270,116 times
Reputation: 348

Advertisements

I am a junior in college (IT major) and when I finish college, I have NM in my mind. I am from NJ living with parents. I haven't visited NM before and I think I would have to live in an apartment first, then consider buying a house. I am viewing Google Earth on a couple of neighborhoods that are close to ABQ. I want to live in a neighborhood where the houses are spaced apart and not extremely far from ABQ:

1. Schools are NO ISSUE AT ALL, since I do not want kids
2. I would also prefer to live in a desert and not on property that has greenery, because I don't want to be dealing with maintaining a lawn such as mowing it. That's the purpose of me living in a desert. I like the barren look anyways. I don't mind desert shrubs growing on a lawn as long as society is fine with that.
3. All I need is a cheap small house.
4. Towns that have young people or at least have access to young people and not just a town or region full of retirees. I felt that NJ is like a retiree state. I didn't want AZ, because of the high concentrations of them in the good AZ towns that are not hot like Phoenix.
5. If I do land a job in NM, let's just assume that ABQ is the only place in NM I would land a job. The most pleasurable commute would be 30 minutes or less. I don't mind 45 minutes.
6. Would prefer 100K or less. Sounds unrealistic to you, but I've done research on Zillow and realtor.com

I've looked at towns east of ABQ that run off of I-40 such as Carnuel, Edgewood, Cedar Grove, etc, but forget Cedar Crest since greenery is something I don't want.

I've looked at Sandia Heights even though that is technically part of the city of ABQ.

I've also looked at Placitas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-04-2019, 02:25 PM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
8,006 posts, read 16,942,636 times
Reputation: 7021
Have you visited a loan officer yet to see how much you would be qualified to borrow? You always want to execute this step first before discussing the "french pastry". You need a financial plan first.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2019, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Abu Al-Qurq
3,633 posts, read 7,411,514 times
Reputation: 2800
To find houses of a certain spacing, it's not where you look that matters, but when you look, in terms of when the house was built.

Round about 1980 the city of Albuquerque changed its zoning ordinances to pack houses in tighter; less setback requirements, closer to the edge of the lot. This meant developers could build more houses on more lots in the same number of acres.

Other cities in the region didn't have to follow suit, but they tended to. Rio Rancho of course was essentially nonexistent scrubland in 1980. Most of the land west of the river was undeveloped as well.

This means that the suburban layer of Albuquerque proper (Indian School to Montgomery, San Mateo to Tramway, roughly) tends to offer the largest number of houses on more than 1/4 acre each. But they're all 40+ years old now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-05-2019, 08:59 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
717 posts, read 270,116 times
Reputation: 348
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoidberg View Post
To find houses of a certain spacing, it's not where you look that matters, but when you look, in terms of when the house was built.

Round about 1980 the city of Albuquerque changed its zoning ordinances to pack houses in tighter; less setback requirements, closer to the edge of the lot. This meant developers could build more houses on more lots in the same number of acres.

Other cities in the region didn't have to follow suit, but they tended to. Rio Rancho of course was essentially nonexistent scrubland in 1980. Most of the land west of the river was undeveloped as well.

This means that the suburban layer of Albuquerque proper (Indian School to Montgomery, San Mateo to Tramway, roughly) tends to offer the largest number of houses on more than 1/4 acre each. But they're all 40+ years old now.
I never knew this was even a thing. I hate how the desert areas crowd their houses together, but yet outside of the suburban areas, you can all of the sudden find a lot of space between houses. It is weird how NM crowds their houses considering that NM offers even more flat land than Utah, Colorado, and even more than Arizona.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-05-2019, 09:22 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,492 posts, read 39,631,222 times
Reputation: 28579
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
I never knew this was even a thing. I hate how the desert areas crowd their houses together, but yet outside of the suburban areas, you can all of the sudden find a lot of space between houses. It is weird how NM crowds their houses considering that NM offers even more flat land than Utah, Colorado, and even more than Arizona.
All areas of housing requires certain features like roads, electricity, water, sewage, phone service, etc...

There are some who try and live without those amenities.

There is nothing "weird" about it. It is pretty much a fact. It is how life works...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
3,004 posts, read 4,605,931 times
Reputation: 4336
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
I am a junior in college (IT major) and when I finish college, I have NM in my mind. I am from NJ living with parents. I haven't visited NM before and I think I would have to live in an apartment first, then consider buying a house. I am viewing Google Earth on a couple of neighborhoods that are close to ABQ. I want to live in a neighborhood where the houses are spaced apart and not extremely far from ABQ:

1. Schools are NO ISSUE AT ALL, since I do not want kids
2. I would also prefer to live in a desert and not on property that has greenery, because I don't want to be dealing with maintaining a lawn such as mowing it. That's the purpose of me living in a desert. I like the barren look anyways. I don't mind desert shrubs growing on a lawn as long as society is fine with that.
3. All I need is a cheap small house.
4. Towns that have young people or at least have access to young people and not just a town or region full of retirees. I felt that NJ is like a retiree state. I didn't want AZ, because of the high concentrations of them in the good AZ towns that are not hot like Phoenix.
5. If I do land a job in NM, let's just assume that ABQ is the only place in NM I would land a job. The most pleasurable commute would be 30 minutes or less. I don't mind 45 minutes.
6. Would prefer 100K or less. Sounds unrealistic to you, but I've done research on Zillow and realtor.com

I've looked at towns east of ABQ that run off of I-40 such as Carnuel, Edgewood, Cedar Grove, etc, but forget Cedar Crest since greenery is something I don't want.

I've looked at Sandia Heights even though that is technically part of the city of ABQ.

I've also looked at Placitas.
You have a lot of strange ideas about the area without having visited. Your ideas of "greenery" and "lawns" are typically Eastern and have nothing to do with NM vegetation. Your whole purpose for moving to "a desert" has to do with avoiding lawn maintenance? Just find an apartment in a city somewhere to test your wings and get yourself established. No lawn, no worries, plenty of access to young people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:




Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Mexico
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top