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Old 11-16-2020, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
1,860 posts, read 1,798,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cactus Hibs View Post
I've never been to Hobbs that I can remember, but yeah, I would agree Carlsbad is pretty blue-collar in many ways. The town itself has some nice neighborhoods and (relatively) fancy homes, especially on the north side, so there is definitely some money there. But when the Permian is really going there are a *lot* of oil-field guys in town (mostly from Texas, OK and LA) packing all the hotels and temporary housing or even just camping out in trailers. Most of the businesses and restaurants in town cater to them which really gives it a blue-collar feel.

That said, those guys might be riggers and fuelers and heavy equipment operators or whatever, but they're all staying there on oil-company accounts and racking up overtime so hotel prices get ratcheted up - comparable to Albuquerque or Santa Fe - and the cost of living can get pretty high. The last time I was in town I noticed the Burger King was advertising a $15/hr wage just to have a chance of drawing anybody in...good luck finding that elsewhere!
My observation that Carlsbad is more white collar may be completely off. I spent most of my time on the south side of town as that is where the hotel was or at my company's facility outside of town. It was mostly oilfield workers and very rowdy. Hotels were expensive but I knew about my upcoming work assignment and made reservations early to get a corporate rate at a good chain. The other hotel occupants looked like businessmen or professionals. Many of other hotels were sort of seedy with guys hanging out in the parking lot drinking and yelling until late at night.

When I had a few spare hours near the end of my stay and ventured out to the north of town and drove along the "river", I was amazed at the difference in atmosphere. It was a whole other world of middle class families. The Albertsons was much nicer than the Walmart on the south end of town. I sort of see this as being the real Carlsbad and the south side as a completely different temporary town of transients. And I remember from Cloudcroft that several schoolmates and families at my church had close ties to Carlsbad and these people had money. I would assume that if the OP moved there, he would find a rental apartment or house on the north end before a boom and sign a lease to lock in the rent.
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Old 11-17-2020, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Silver Hill, Albuquerque
996 posts, read 1,043,268 times
Reputation: 1596
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQ2015 View Post
My observation that Carlsbad is more white collar may be completely off. I spent most of my time on the south side of town as that is where the hotel was or at my company's facility outside of town. It was mostly oilfield workers and very rowdy. Hotels were expensive but I knew about my upcoming work assignment and made reservations early to get a corporate rate at a good chain. The other hotel occupants looked like businessmen or professionals. Many of other hotels were sort of seedy with guys hanging out in the parking lot drinking and yelling until late at night.

When I had a few spare hours near the end of my stay and ventured out to the north of town and drove along the "river", I was amazed at the difference in atmosphere. It was a whole other world of middle class families. The Albertsons was much nicer than the Walmart on the south end of town. I sort of see this as being the real Carlsbad and the south side as a completely different temporary town of transients. And I remember from Cloudcroft that several schoolmates and families at my church had close ties to Carlsbad and these people had money. I would assume that if the OP moved there, he would find a rental apartment or house on the north end before a boom and sign a lease to lock in the rent.
Sounds about right for the south side of town; my recent experience in Carlsbad is very similar. I know when we send people down there to work they prefer staying on the north side. According to some estimates the temporary (oil worker) population of Eddy County has in recent years been more than double the permanent resident population, so that transient group cuts a wide swath.

And there is money in town, no question. Lots of petroleum and oilfield-services companies, but also a fair number of white-collar jobs with federal agencies like BLM or NPS.

Within Eddy County, Artesia has the reputation of really being where the money is since several big petro companies have headquarters there and have invested heavily in the community. New Mexico's richest man lives somewhere in the vicinity and some of the custom homes architect friends of mine have worked on in the area are really out of this world. Of course, it's also smaller than C-Bad and has relatively fewer oilfield guys...
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Old 11-23-2020, 01:33 AM
 
22,351 posts, read 6,079,971 times
Reputation: 8225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cactus Hibs View Post
I've never been to Hobbs that I can remember, but yeah, I would agree Carlsbad is pretty blue-collar in many ways. The town itself has some nice neighborhoods and (relatively) fancy homes, especially on the north side, so there is definitely some money there. But when the Permian is really going there are a *lot* of oil-field guys in town (mostly from Texas, OK and LA) packing all the hotels and temporary housing or even just camping out in trailers. Most of the businesses and restaurants in town cater to them which really gives it a blue-collar feel.

That said, those guys might be riggers and fuelers and heavy equipment operators or whatever, but they're all staying there on oil-company accounts and racking up overtime so hotel prices get ratcheted up - comparable to Albuquerque or Santa Fe - and the cost of living can get pretty high. The last time I was in town I noticed the Burger King was advertising a $15/hr wage just to have a chance of drawing anybody in...good luck finding that elsewhere!
Okay i see....thanks for the info.
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Old 11-23-2020, 01:34 AM
 
22,351 posts, read 6,079,971 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cactus Hibs View Post
Ain't that the truth? After 2020 I don't even know what a normal boundary looks like anymore!
Good point.
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Old 11-23-2020, 01:37 AM
 
22,351 posts, read 6,079,971 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DOUBLE H View Post
It's been a few years since I've spent time in Hobbs, the last time I was through there is when the Hastings entertainment stores were closing their stores. I bought a lot of cd's, new release vinyl, movies, and books. I knew that the store in Hobbs would have some good stock, that particular store was only a third of the size that you would have at the Albuquerque stores. Stayed the night in Hobbs at Motel 6. At that time (May-2016) the price was $40 or thereabouts.

Something unique to an oil field town is classical music. Do a search on Southwest Symphony – Hobbs NM Symphony. Southwest Symphony has been in the Hobbs area for over 30 years. The orchestra plays pop music as well as classical and does 7 or 8 concerts a year to the public. They get funding for a variety of sources, from Chevron to Baymont Suites Hotels to the city itself.

I got to know some of the folks from the Hobbs area from the Junior College World Series that Grand Junction Colorado sponsors at Sam Suplezio Field. It's been going strong since 1950. Their sons attend the University of the Southwest. Yes, they have a college in Hobbs, a pretty good baseball club there as well! The folks I met there are involved with the symphony.
ya i remember reading about the classical music in Hobbs although i am not really interested in concerts but thanks anyways DOUBLE H.
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Old 11-23-2020, 01:38 AM
 
22,351 posts, read 6,079,971 times
Reputation: 8225
Quote:
Originally Posted by elkotronics View Post
okay kool.....what else do you feel is Texan about it???

C24L - pickup trucks all over the place and hick men and women who love to eat. I mean, I work in the medical industry so I see this up close and personal. The women from Texas are usually big-boned and plain looking. Often with real white skin and flabby arms.

That's OK - so were the women in Kansas City. Women in KC love to put their hair in a bun and many here do too, but most of the women that live in Alamogordo, Las Luz or Tularosa and are from Texas have a plain look to their face. Sort of a 'Little House on the Prairie' look. They're usually straight-shootin' women and not afraid to tell you what for.

Just some things I've noticed. The place still has Texas in it but it's got an identity of its own, though. Holloman AFB brings people from all over the place, including western Washington, where I'm from.

Alamogordo is not only a good town ta live in, it's a great town ta live in. I was thinking of selling our house here and moving up north to Las Vegas, NM, but now have abandoned that idea and my better half and I are just going to pay down our house and settle here in Alamogordo.
okay thanks elkotronics.
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Old 11-23-2020, 01:41 AM
 
22,351 posts, read 6,079,971 times
Reputation: 8225
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQ2015 View Post
My observation that Carlsbad is more white collar may be completely off. I spent most of my time on the south side of town as that is where the hotel was or at my company's facility outside of town. It was mostly oilfield workers and very rowdy. Hotels were expensive but I knew about my upcoming work assignment and made reservations early to get a corporate rate at a good chain. The other hotel occupants looked like businessmen or professionals. Many of other hotels were sort of seedy with guys hanging out in the parking lot drinking and yelling until late at night.

When I had a few spare hours near the end of my stay and ventured out to the north of town and drove along the "river", I was amazed at the difference in atmosphere. It was a whole other world of middle class families. The Albertsons was much nicer than the Walmart on the south end of town. I sort of see this as being the real Carlsbad and the south side as a completely different temporary town of transients. And I remember from Cloudcroft that several schoolmates and families at my church had close ties to Carlsbad and these people had money. I would assume that if the OP moved there, he would find a rental apartment or house on the north end before a boom and sign a lease to lock in the rent.
i would prolly get a place during a boom since i am in the oilfield but idk for sure yet.It just depends.
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Old 11-23-2020, 01:43 AM
 
22,351 posts, read 6,079,971 times
Reputation: 8225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cactus Hibs View Post
Sounds about right for the south side of town; my recent experience in Carlsbad is very similar. I know when we send people down there to work they prefer staying on the north side. According to some estimates the temporary (oil worker) population of Eddy County has in recent years been more than double the permanent resident population, so that transient group cuts a wide swath.

And there is money in town, no question. Lots of petroleum and oilfield-services companies, but also a fair number of white-collar jobs with federal agencies like BLM or NPS.

Within Eddy County, Artesia has the reputation of really being where the money is since several big petro companies have headquarters there and have invested heavily in the community. New Mexico's richest man lives somewhere in the vicinity and some of the custom homes architect friends of mine have worked on in the area are really out of this world. Of course, it's also smaller than C-Bad and has relatively fewer oilfield guys...
ya i remember reading how the richest New Mexican lives in the Artesia area.
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