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Old 06-16-2008, 02:26 PM
 
7 posts, read 14,348 times
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I lived in Alamogordo for 4 years and liked it a lot. My family just got transferred to Langley from Holloman and I still have a house there in Alamo waiting to be rented. The housing market is flooded there right now, so if you're looking at buying, you'll get a bargain. I lived near airport road in the little development there and it was a great time. Car never broken into, no fighting in streets, dead end roads so low traffic, all in all a great area for family living. Even a pool at the end of the street and tennis courts!!

NM is really different in that you can have a taste of the city life but live in a more rural area. I throroughly enjoyed my 4 years there and hope to get transferred back later on in my career towards retirement!!

Last edited by benny03701; 06-16-2008 at 02:27 PM.. Reason: mispelling!!
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Old 03-12-2020, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Long Island, NY
52 posts, read 38,972 times
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Default Wildfires & Floods: Still Happening in Alamogordo & Cloudcroft?

Quote:
Originally Posted by malamute View Post
Cloudcroft is beautiful -- but then you have heating bills in the winter and you have to deal with forest fires and the anticipation of them. Forest fires happen -- just like storm water.

If it were me, I'd pick Alamogordo and take advantage of it's closeness to Cloudcroft pretty often.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jecc View Post
Minor flooding in Alamo is seasonal and common. Major flooding is rare, though certainly worth doing your homework on. Forest fires near CC are common, but major ones that wipe out many homes are rare. I would guess there's a greater chance of losing your house to fire near the forest than to flooding in the desert.
I bumped into your posts while searching "alamogordo nm flooding". I'm from NY and would love to retire in NM, though its not especially income tax friendly to seniors-especially single ones. https://rpea.org/retirement-planning...-tax-by-state/
https://smartasset.com/retirement/ne...xes#uhLyGpCSW8


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=afOPDv3gqXY

Tornados scare the crap out of me, which except along the western and especially eastern borders don't happen very often. https://www.ustornadoes.com/2013/03/...te-and-region/

I don't know much about Alamogordo, except from this report.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alamogordo,_New_Mexico

One would think that since much of the town was apparently planned by the US military that enough culverts would have been installed to pass the waters under roads. Aren't most of the roads paved in Alamo with sewers to accept flood waters?

As for wildfires, perhaps due to climate change are now they now more frequent and/or intense than they were 12 years ago in Alamo or nearby Cloudcroft?

Lastly, is there lots of noise from the Air Force jet take offs in Alamo?
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Old 03-12-2020, 01:09 PM
 
Location: 32°19'03.7"N 106°43'55.9"W
8,289 posts, read 18,210,920 times
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Large portions of Alamogordo lie within an AH flood zone designation. There is a very efficient lightweight ArcGIS FEMA mapping tool that you can use to locate what parcels would lie within a flood zone. Here is the link:

https://hazards-fema.maps.arcgis.com...89781856978252
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Old 03-16-2020, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Long Island, NY
52 posts, read 38,972 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
Large portions of Alamogordo lie within an AH flood zone designation. There is a very efficient lightweight ArcGIS FEMA mapping tool that you can use to locate what parcels would lie within a flood zone. Here is the link:

https://hazards-fema.maps.arcgis.com...89781856978252
Thank you very much for this excellent and periodically updated flood zone viewing tool. If I'm reading it correctly, when the areas in blue flood it's usually up to a foot of water? Could that be because the streets appear to be paved, and so likely have culverts under the asphalt, which being fed by storm drains, sendwater through the culverts out past the developed areas?

And the area in blue flood more often? About once or more a year?

And the area in brown may or may not flood if the blue area floods?

Or the brown could flood anyway even if the blue area doesn't?

However credible the source, rainfall during the monsoon season from "July to September, when half a typical year's rainfall of 10.96 inches or 278.4 millimeters will occur." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alamog...Mexico#Climate

But if most paved streets have culverts how bad might human induced climate change increased flood water depth on those streets over the last few years?

Regarding earthquakes, this map of projected changes to fault systems seems to show earthquakes events in NM almost the same as NY
https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2014...us-earthquakes

In any case, might you know if most homes in the ~ $300K range have reinforced construction to prevent catastrophic damage due to the intensity of earthquake events Alamogordo area typically experiences?
https://www.earthquakecountry.org/step4/urmwalls/

https://www.usgs.gov/media/images/20...map-new-mexico

Would you say that it appears the intensity of NM quakes, though higher in frequency, seems to be around the same intensity as those happening in NY? https://www.usgs.gov/natural-hazards...and-statistics
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Old 03-16-2020, 05:12 PM
 
Location: 5,400 feet
3,577 posts, read 3,178,544 times
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The New Mexico income tax rate is 4.9%. Social security is taxed by the state only if your other income is high enough for it to be taxed by the feds. There are numerous low income credits and deductions, as well as a capital gains deduction. You really need to look into the actual determination of how you personally will be impacted.

We moved here 20+ years ago from Michigan and I don't find the income tax to be an unreasonable burden. Auto and home owners' insurance is less than many states, as are property taxes.
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Old 04-26-2020, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Long Island, NY
52 posts, read 38,972 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
Large portions of Alamogordo lie within an AH flood zone designation. There is a very efficient lightweight ArcGIS FEMA mapping tool that you can use to locate what parcels would lie within a flood zone. Here is the link:

https://hazards-fema.maps.arcgis.com...89781856978252
Quote:
Originally Posted by jiminnm View Post
We moved here 20+ years ago from Michigan......
It’s been said that except for areas bordering TX, NM is not prone to high force tornadoes. This may be true, but I’d have to build my house from mostly brick to sustain what Gordo homeowners have been getting hit with.

https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...IIBQ%253D%253D

And building in much of NM can be hazardous due to the soil’s high salt and gypsum content, making them prone to sinkholes, https://www.abqjournal.com/13844/645...llows-car.html as this USGS map shows. Go here and scroll down.

https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/w...center_objects

And then there are dangers that even a brick house built almost anywhere in Gordo won’t protect you from.
https://www.alamogordonews.com/video...son/101753394/

Let’s not kid ourselves: Retirees move to places primarily where property taxes are low. Consequently, most of those places not only have small and/or low budget school districts but also low budget local governments. In the case of both AZ and NM this is reflected in DPWs lacking funds to pave roads and with underground culverts to channel flood waters to arroyos and into reservoirs-and ideally thereby used for irrigation and purified for drinking.

So while your money may buy you a beautiful home (however well reinforced against earthquakes, strong tremors and tornadoes) in these places, the lower school and/or general taxes also mean substandard police and fire protection, which invites more crime and less capability to fight wildfires-especially perilous in the drought prone southwest. Rio Rancho’s 10 million dollar bond issue passed last year, but with over 100 miles of flood challenged dirt roads and all manner of crime it may end up taking more than this to keep homeowners out of harm’s way.

As crime and climate change continue to impact communities how long can Alamogordo, Las Cruces and Rio Rancho hold the line on taxes to keep homeowners safe?

My last hope was Silver City or Deming but except for perhaps for sinkholes and tornadoes those problems plus bad flooding, crime and inadequate medical and dental care even for privately insured seniors-and inadequate funds and expertise to solve them-made building a home there a fool’s wisdom.

Badly heartbroken, I have since abandoned my dream for retiring to the Land of Enchantment.
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Old 04-28-2020, 10:06 AM
 
460 posts, read 107,331 times
Reputation: 362
Quote:
Originally Posted by Longislandmire View Post
Thank you very much for this excellent and periodically updated flood zone viewing tool. If I'm reading it correctly, when the areas in blue flood it's usually up to a foot of water? Could that be because the streets appear to be paved, and so likely have culverts under the asphalt, which being fed by storm drains, sendwater through the culverts out past the developed areas?

And the area in blue flood more often? About once or more a year?

And the area in brown may or may not flood if the blue area floods?

Or the brown could flood anyway even if the blue area doesn't?

However credible the source, rainfall during the monsoon season from "July to September, when half a typical year's rainfall of 10.96 inches or 278.4 millimeters will occur." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alamog...Mexico#Climate

But if most paved streets have culverts how bad might human induced climate change increased flood water depth on those streets over the last few years?

Regarding earthquakes, this map of projected changes to fault systems seems to show earthquakes events in NM almost the same as NY
https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2014...us-earthquakes

In any case, might you know if most homes in the ~ $300K range have reinforced construction to prevent catastrophic damage due to the intensity of earthquake events Alamogordo area typically experiences?
https://www.earthquakecountry.org/step4/urmwalls/

https://www.usgs.gov/media/images/20...map-new-mexico

Would you say that it appears the intensity of NM quakes, though higher in frequency, seems to be around the same intensity as those happening in NY? https://www.usgs.gov/natural-hazards...and-statistics
Earthquakes destroying Alamogordo??
My understanding there's no earthquake hazard in NM to speak of.
One can try Pacific Coast to see earthquakes...people just buy earthquake insurance.
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Old 04-28-2020, 10:11 AM
 
460 posts, read 107,331 times
Reputation: 362
Quote:
Originally Posted by Longislandmire View Post
It’s been said that except for areas bordering TX, NM is not prone to high force tornadoes. This may be true, but I’d have to build my house from mostly brick to sustain what Gordo homeowners have been getting hit with.

https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...IIBQ%253D%253D

And building in much of NM can be hazardous due to the soil’s high salt and gypsum content, making them prone to sinkholes, https://www.abqjournal.com/13844/645...llows-car.html as this USGS map shows. Go here and scroll down.

https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/w...center_objects

And then there are dangers that even a brick house built almost anywhere in Gordo won’t protect you from.
https://www.alamogordonews.com/video...son/101753394/

Let’s not kid ourselves: Retirees move to places primarily where property taxes are low. Consequently, most of those places not only have small and/or low budget school districts but also low budget local governments. In the case of both AZ and NM this is reflected in DPWs lacking funds to pave roads and with underground culverts to channel flood waters to arroyos and into reservoirs-and ideally thereby used for irrigation and purified for drinking.

So while your money may buy you a beautiful home (however well reinforced against earthquakes, strong tremors and tornadoes) in these places, the lower school and/or general taxes also mean substandard police and fire protection, which invites more crime and less capability to fight wildfires-especially perilous in the drought prone southwest. Rio Rancho’s 10 million dollar bond issue passed last year, but with over 100 miles of flood challenged dirt roads and all manner of crime it may end up taking more than this to keep homeowners out of harm’s way.

As crime and climate change continue to impact communities how long can Alamogordo, Las Cruces and Rio Rancho hold the line on taxes to keep homeowners safe?

My last hope was Silver City or Deming but except for perhaps for sinkholes and tornadoes those problems plus bad flooding, crime and inadequate medical and dental care even for privately insured seniors-and inadequate funds and expertise to solve them-made building a home there a fool’s wisdom.

Badly heartbroken, I have since abandoned my dream for retiring to the Land of Enchantment.
A trailer had been torn up by high winds? They fall apart all the time, these matchboxes, that's why it's so hard to insure them, especially for any decent amount of money.
For regular home, there's home insurance. I haven't heard of any issues with wildfire insurance in NM yet, by the way.

I'd be more concerned with sinkholes, as home insurance doesn't cover them and most states don't offer a rider for them.
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Old 04-28-2020, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Long Island, NY
52 posts, read 38,972 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by landlock View Post
Earthquakes destroying Alamogordo?? My understanding there's no earthquake hazard in NM to speak of.........
Quote:
Originally Posted by landlock View Post
A trailer had been torn up by high winds? They fall apart all the time, these matchboxes, that's why it's so hard to insure them, especially for any decent amount of money.
For regular home, there's home insurance. I haven't heard of any issues with wildfire insurance in NM yet, by the way.

I'd be more concerned with sinkholes, as home insurance doesn't cover them and most states don't offer a rider for them.
Even tornadoes less than Force 3 can damage brick and mortar homes.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35eCZszxrDY Homeowners are foolish if they don’t prepare for them by instead purchasing homes mostly of brick or reinforced adobe, or re-building a home with these more tornado resistant materials. It would also be wise to have some amount of tornado (or dust devil) insurance coverage.

But there are other essential pre-home purchase precautions, as discussed below.

While Alamogordo may not be especially prone to wild fires it certainly has been impacted by those from nearby jurisdictions-and which may not have adequate fire fighting resources. https://apnews.com/bc98b5d89b81c3d3819fa7448b971fdc

https://apnews.com/c0494b3cdd36406e979345f0f392625b


Gordo hasn’t been the epicenter of much, if any, seismic activity, though it is part of a fault system. https://earthquake.usgs.gov/cfusion/...4&section_id=c

And while not the epicenter this time, Lordsburg felt a 3.2 quake 30 miles away in AZ https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthqua...6qd9/executive

Other areas are substantially more prone to quakes, particularly ABQ, Belen and Socorro. https://pubs.usgs.gov/mf/2035/plate-1.pdf

I also said earlier that sinkholes are common throughout much of NM. Again, it’s critical to rely on impartial and expert sources, such as the USGS. https://www.usgs.gov/media/images/ka...-and-sinkholes As you can see by the map legend most of NM-like the western region of NY, for example-are prone to sinkholes.

See what happens too often in Rio Rancho.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6BlRtUJNKA0


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTkDQmdlbOc


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEgci2GF0vM


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hkHqhoHXyfM

And in sinkholes in Belen and Socorro

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lDaYQKKjwA


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rxzcpf38dF4

According to the USGS, Alamogordo’s subsurface is largely salt and gypsum, making it porous enough to suddenly break down during flooding, human delivered impacts and/or numerous and frequent micro tremors. So it’s likely just a matter of time until sinkhole incidents begin happening there. While buying a sinkhole repaired home is possibly quite safe, as much of NM is sinkhole prone, buying an otherwise new or existing home not or building on virgin land that have never caved in from sinkholes is unwise.
https://www.foundationprosfl.com/buy...ired-sinkhole/

For those like me who would likely have to build a retirement home, anyone doing so on sinkhole prone land would need to first determine how deep and wide the sinkhole could likely grow, excavate an expertly prescribed area beyond the new house foundations and fill it in accordingly. https://www.wikihow.com/Fix-Sinkholes

Needless to say, another huge concern throughout much of NM is seasonal and flash flooding. And like where I had hoped to live in the Silver City area, Alamogordo gets hit by flooding from seasonal monsoons. Again, as in most NM counties, tax revenue is obviously too low to build enough road culverts, arroyos and reservoirs to prevent flooding-while also facilitating serendipitous flood water capture and purification against droughts, which also plague most western states. Rio Rancho was able to pass a $10 million bond issuing last year for flood water management construction-AND for more police protection, as all manner of crime is a HUGE problem throughout much of NM.

Any type or number of disasters can happen anywhere of course, so having various kinds of insurance is essential. However, I really live for my stuff, much of which is irreplaceable, so I need to live in the least hazardous areas that I can tolerate and afford.

But if many of NM’s counties and the state don’t get a lot more serious and quickly about funding cost-effective flood and drought mitigation systems for residential and commercial use, agricultural irrigation, fire fighting and to support (regulated) economic development, conditions will likely soon get much worse due to inevitable human induced climate change and capital flight.

I would strongly advise all NM homeowners to pressure their elected representatives to make this happen ASAP-even as we are still at risk by the pandemic and however long that may be. And make sure they understand that success in reducing the dangers of flooding, crime and snake bite rates will spur economic development which-IF regulated to protect wildlife habitats and green space and to prevent over population to insure NM’s tourist trade and minimize taxes, unlike practically everywhere else in the nation-can attract new industries and investors. That will create good quality jobs, better goods and services and improve the quality of medical and dental care for all age groups, while still preserving the lifestyle and landscapes unique to much of NM.

This goes DOUBLE for you Silver City, Lordsburg and Deming!

Who knows, if these miracles do happen in those places within the next FIVE years maybe I can retire there. But I’m not exactly optimistic. Besides, no way can I have scorpions and black widows as neighbors, and the snake bite rate is way too high in NM and AZ.

Meanwhile, I have to keep working and saving.

This is Yellowstone, not NM,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BRbBcniI1Ao
but these sounds remind me of places like here

https://newmexicomeanders.com/2014/0...olcanic-field/

Enjoy!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQzW6wz2JQk


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5FN06LFfHk
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Old 04-28-2020, 08:15 PM
 
460 posts, read 107,331 times
Reputation: 362
Huh, New Meixco doesn't have any real earthquake hazard....I'm used to living all over Pacific coast where it's shaking on a regular basis, nobody bats an eye. In NM, there's really no need to buy earthquake insurance policy.
If you're looking for a place not prone to tornados, wildfires, floods and earthquakes (and volcanoes) it's hard to find. Plus, there're hurricanes and tsunamis on the coasts. Don't forget about the landslides, they're not covered by insurance. May be very North of United States by Canada border and even many of those parts get hit by tornadoes occasionally. But if I had to live somewhere in Northern Minnesota... I think I'd take bad spider bite over that.

As to sinkholes...people just live with this, they're happening in many states. Just the way of life, I guess people just hope for the best (but I personally wouldn't). I don't think it's safe or wise to buy sinkhole-repaired home at all, there's zero guarantee there won't be another sinkhole affecting it any time. My understanding is that sinkhole-prone areas such as one you see on that map tend to be patchy, and while it shows it all as a large area on USGS map, inside these sinkhole-prone zones there are areas that just don't get them/different geology.
Oh well, when Yellowstone volcano goes off nothing will matter. Anyway, after COVID epidemic there'll be even less resources to manage various hazards. I wouldn't place any bets on improvements soon... I recall I tried to get dam inundation map for Truth or Consequences...good luck with that, local officials/emergency management director have the map but won't even share it with the public, they don't care.

Don't forget air pollution, Alamogordo has air quality problems and Silver City is close to giant Chama mine (dust?) and there's ground pollution from past activities too.

Last edited by landlock; 04-28-2020 at 08:49 PM..
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