U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Mexico
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 08-07-2008, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Raton NM
215 posts, read 615,962 times
Reputation: 225

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jiggs69 View Post
I've always pronounced it the Spanish way but I've heard it said as Ra-tone and Rat-un...from a Texan

As for Albuquerque it's supposed to be Alburquerque but an Anglo trader couldn't pronounce the first "r" so was left off his sign.

The pronounces that kill me as a native are:
Mad-Rid (Ma-dreed) w/a roll on the r
Te-su-key (Teh-su-keh)
Po-wa-key (Po - wha - keh)
Ree-uh-doe-ser (Roo-ee-doe-so)

Someone mentioned Tecolote and Tecolotito,those are good areas to avoid if you're not a native,lol.
DH just got back from visiting Rat-on, and just like you said, the locals pronounce it really heavy on the RAT...guess that kinda makes sense.
In all of the places we've lived, I really try to not offend the locals, with things like mis-pronunciation...it's sometimes hard to be accepted into new communities, but that will always leave a sour taste....
Thanks for the info....
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-07-2008, 08:05 PM
 
47,528 posts, read 64,951,273 times
Reputation: 22370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoidberg View Post
To'hajiilee means (I've been told) "place near water".

Just call it Twahili (rhymes with Swahili, the language). It seems like just another spanish word once you get past how complicated it looks (and you have the correct pronunciation).


I've noticed that just as there is a bit of snobbery or good-natured snickering toward the ignorant mispronunciations of places (Poe-joe-ak-ee) coming from the locals, some of the locals get also irritated at the overaccentuation from out-of-towners (or ambitious young adults) who insist their background gives them carte blanche to vary from the common pronunciation.

I think it's most noticeable when someone is speaking English to you but will accentuate the locality like they're speaking Spanish (not AL-boo-cur-key but awl-boo-KAIR-KAY), with the accents far in excess of anything heard in English. If it's a Spanish sentence, then that's different.

It's just speech, after all, but is switching languages midsentence supposed to achieve a positive result? Funny how there's so much more to the spoken word than the written word.
I agree with you -- some people go so far out of their way that it sounds only weird. Whatever the locals call it, however they pronounce it would seem to me to be the way to go.

One example I think is funny is listening to Americans try to make sure they pronounce the Rio Grande exactly the way they think a Mexican would want it prounounced -- buy in reality the Mexicans don't call it that, they named it something different, often call it simply El Bravo.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-07-2008, 08:11 PM
 
47,528 posts, read 64,951,273 times
Reputation: 22370
Quote:
Originally Posted by loborick View Post
You should always pronounce Spanish place names correctly. Just because you are speaking in English doesn't mean you should not pronounce them correctly. You are not switching languages, just pronouncing a word correctly.

And To'hajiilee is a Navajo word, not a Spanish word.
I don't agree with that -- we don't demand that Mexicans and other Latin Americans pronounce all our cities' names correctly. Among themselves, speaking their own language they will call New York "Nueva Yorc", or Chicago "Cheecago" and I doubt most of us get very upset by that.

And I wonder if all of us, including the Mexicans are trying extremely hard to get the Indian pronounciations down pat -- and I've seen many people try to pronounce Navajo words as though they were Spanish which wouldn't be correct at all.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2008, 06:35 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,478 posts, read 55,404,601 times
Reputation: 24765
Learn to pronounce name like the people you are with. When in Paris speak like you have a head cold.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2008, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Ruidoso, NM
5,462 posts, read 5,761,522 times
Reputation: 4555
Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
and Ruidoso is pronounced Ree-uh-doso, I've never heard anyone say it differently.
Then you haven't heard me say it! I pronounce it close to the way it is spelled... Ru-eh-doso (could be Ru-ee-doso though). But most of the people who live here (mostly from Texas) say REE-uh-doso, or REE-uh-dosa. I guess they have trouble with phonetics... or maybe Ru-eh-doso is more cumbersome to say with a Texas accent.

It means "noisy water" in Apache... and I think it would be spelled differently if it was supposed to be REE-uh-doso... like Riadoso.

EDIT: After a little research I see that ruidoso means "loud" in spanish... which could hardly be a coincidence... and yet many places say it means "noisy water" in Apache. A spanish word acquired by the Apache and the meaning changed a little?

Last edited by rruff; 08-08-2008 at 11:49 AM..
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2008, 11:51 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas NM
203 posts, read 673,350 times
Reputation: 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoidberg View Post
To'hajiilee means (I've been told) "place near water".

Just call it Twahili (rhymes with Swahili, the language). It seems like just another spanish word once you get past how complicated it looks (and you have the correct pronunciation).
To'hajiilee is a Dineh/ Navajo place name, not Spanish.
Dineh nationals I have known pronounced it something like "too-wattchillee"
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2008, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Abu Al-Qurq
3,689 posts, read 8,328,457 times
Reputation: 2974
Quote:
Originally Posted by loborick View Post
And To'hajiilee is a Navajo word, not a Spanish word.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsc23 View Post
To'hajiilee is a Dineh/ Navajo place name, not Spanish.
If you read my original post, I mentioned To'hajiilee seems like just another Spanish word.

Since it's a place name, it's not tied to a language. And, as spelled, seems like it has mutated significantly from the original Diné. It's an awfully weak argument to make that it's not Spanish.

Using this same logic, Albuquerque is a Moorish word, not Spanish. Let's never mind that the original Moorish Abu-Al-Qurq got mangled by the Spanish, then mangled by English-speaking Americans.

In the end, it's a place. Albuquerque seems like just another Spanish word to some, and the US English version sounds ok too.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2008, 05:14 PM
 
Location: West of Bum Ph*ck, PA
5 posts, read 34,422 times
Reputation: 27
According to locals, it's MAD-rid, I spent many a Sunday there.
Also according to locals, it's teh-SUE-kee and poe-HAWK-kay. If you listen to THEM anyway. Trivia: The Poo-Hawks from the old cartoon strip are Pojoaques.
I always heard rat-OWN. And toe-HAJ-ill-lee. SANta fe. la see-EN-ah-ga. san HONE.
And as for Dzilth-whatever-they-call-it (Dzilth-na-o-dith-hle) , we call it DZ.
But what do I know? I used to live off of won ta-BOW Blvd.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2008, 01:04 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas NM
203 posts, read 673,350 times
Reputation: 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoidberg View Post
If you read my original post, I mentioned To'hajiilee seems like just another Spanish word.

Since it's a place name, it's not tied to a language. And, as spelled, seems like it has mutated significantly from the original Diné. It's an awfully weak argument to make that it's not Spanish.

Using this same logic, Albuquerque is a Moorish word, not Spanish. Let's never mind that the original Moorish Abu-Al-Qurq got mangled by the Spanish, then mangled by English-speaking Americans.

In the end, it's a place. Albuquerque seems like just another Spanish word to some, and the US English version sounds ok too.
Sorry, but "...another Spanish word" confused me. I just assumed that for the Navajo place name for a town on a Navajo rez, mostly populated by Navajo, and a center of Navajo culture and government, the local dialect pronunciation would be used... like with Raton, Ruidoso, and Questa...

For the sake of pedantry, etymology is a funny game: Albuquerque quite likely derives from Latin "albus quercus" (tr: White Oak, roughly the same as the Arabic), since Romans first chartered the Iberian namesake town.
Comforting to know place name mangling is an ancient tradition
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2008, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 72,884,309 times
Reputation: 10284
One city in NM I always have a problem with is Abiquiu. How do you pronounce that? Is it "abby-que-ee-you"?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Mexico

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top